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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: divine love

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  • Alfred Housman - 1,661 words
    Alfred Housman Alfred Edward Housman, a classical scholar and poet, was born in Fockbury in the county of Worcestershire, England on March 26, 1859. His poems are variations on the themes of mortality and the miseries of human condition (Magill 1411). Most of Housmans poems were written in the 1890s when he was under great psychological stress, which made the tone of his poems characteristically mournful and the mood dispirited (Magill 1411). "In the world of Housmans poetry, youth fades to dust, lovers are unfaithful, and death is the tranquil end of everything (Magill 1412)." Throughout his life, Housman faced many hardships. The loss of his mother at age 12 shattered his childhood and lef ...
    Related: alfred, housman, true meaning, common theme, imagery
  • Angels - 1,694 words
    Angels Angels Around our pillows golden ladders rise, And up and down the skies, With winged sandals shod, The angels come and go, The messengers of God! ~Richard Henry Stoddard~ Angelos, AYN jul, are both words that mean angel. This goes to show that angels are widespread though out the world. Beliefs and ideas on angels are common among a variety of people in many places and within many religions. As to what a true angel is, in definition, is undecided. Whether there really are angels is the supreme question. The idea of an angel dates back to the 5th century to the religion of Zoroastrianism. Angels were mere agents of a supreme deity. It was believed that there were six archangels who gu ...
    Related: fallen angels, guardian angel, hebrew scriptures, divine love, jews
  • Capital Punishment - 1,693 words
    Capital Punishment The topic I chose for my research paper is Capital punishment. I chose this topic because I think Capital punishment should be banned in all states. The death penalty violates religious beliefs about killing, remains unfair to minorities and is therefore unconstitutional, and is inhumane and barbaric. The death penalty constitutes cruel and unusual punishment in violation of the Eighth and Fourteenth Amendments (Bedau 2). Those who had shown no respect for life would be restrained, permanently if necessary, so they could not further endanger other members of the community (Cauthen 2). But the purpose of confinement would not be vengeance or punishment (Cauthen 2). Rather a ...
    Related: capital punishment, punishment, violent crime, black white, expensive
  • Dante And His Inferno - 1,131 words
    Dante And His Inferno Dante And His Inferno Dante Alighieri, one of the greatest poets of the Middle Ages, was born in Florence, Italy, supposedly around May 29, 1265, to a middle-class Florentine family. A year later, on Easter Sunday, he was baptized, later describing this as his first step toward salvation. At an early age, he began to write poetry and became fascinated with lyrics. In 1274, during his adolescence, Dante fell in love with a beautiful girl named Beatrice Portinari. This love of his, though, was in truth simply a lust issue, as they had not actually met more than twice. Unfortunately for Dante, his father passed away in 1283, leaving him yearning for fatherly affection whic ...
    Related: dante, dante alighieri, inferno, divine comedy, literary works
  • John Donne - 784 words
    John Donne As a young poet, John Donne often utilized metaphors of spiritual bond in many of his Songs and Sonnets in order to explain fleshly love. Once he renounced Catholicism and converted to the Anglican faith (circa 1597), Donne donned a more devotional style of verse, such as in his Holy Sonnets (circa 1609-1610), finding parallels to divine love in the carnal union. In many ways, however, his love poems and his religious poems are quite similar, for they both address his personaes deep-seated fear of isolation by women and God, respectively. For example, in "Song," Donnes speaker tells an unknown person (presumably male) that if he would "Ride ten thousand days and nights" he would r ...
    Related: donne, john donne, roman catholicism, divine love, conversion
  • John Updikes Ap - 1,817 words
    ... t and that choice is irrevocable. If you commit an act of sin you will be automatically condemned to Hell. The entire basis of Hell is that it is for those who died unrepentant of their sins. Hell is filled with people whom at the moment of death were either unrepentant or were saved but were still committing the same sins. In Hell you get exactly what you give forever. Purgatory is a place that not many protestants know about or think about so it is not as familiar to people as Heaven and Hell are. All our lives people are taught that if you sin you will go to Hell and if you don't sin you will go to Heaven; there has never been any in between. Purgatory is a place for people whom eithe ...
    Related: human life, divine love, kingdom of god, gore, throne
  • Palestrina - 1,562 words
    Palestrina Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina The greatest composer of liturgical music of all time, born at Palestrina (ancient Praeneste) in 1514 or 1515, according to Baini, Riemann, and others, according to Haberl, in 1526; died at Rome, 2 February, 1594. His early history is practically unknown. Giusseppi Ottavia Pittoni (1657-1743), in notizie dei maestri di cappella si di Rome che altramontani, 1600-1700, a manuscript in the Vatican, relates that young Pierluigi sang in the streets of Rome while offering for sale the products of his parents farm and that he was heard on such an occasion by the choirmaster of Santa Maria Maggiore, who, impressed by the boy's beautiful voice and pronounce ...
    Related: palestrina, counter reformation, church music, virgin mary, significance
  • Paradise Lost - 1,047 words
    ... used two main characters to display good and virtue to the reader; the first one is God himself. God was the true symbol of all that is good in the world. God was the creator of man and kept this in control with three mighty powers. The first power was omnipotence, which is being all-powerful. God's second power was that of omnipresent, which is the ability to be present everywhere at the same time. The third mighty power of God was being omniscient, which is the ability to know all things (John). God himself was surrounded by a holy light that is so utterly powerful that he cannot be approached (Milton 92). God displayed the power of omnipotence in full when he was able to cast Satan's ...
    Related: paradise, paradise lost, great powers, adam and eve, pity
  • Rime - 1,037 words
    Rime Of The Ancient Mariner Samuel Taylor Coleridge's poem "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner," written in 1797, has been widely discussed throughout literary history. Although critics have come up with many different interpretations of this poem, one idea that has remained prevalent throughout these discussions is the apparent religious symbolism present throughout this poem. "The Ancient Mariner" contains natural, gothic, and biblical symbolism; however, the religious and natural symbolism, which coincide with one another, play the most important roles in this poem (Piper 43). It is apocalyptic and natural symbolism that dominates the core of this poem (43). The biblical symbolism found in t ...
    Related: rime, rime of the ancient mariner, taylor coleridge, divine love, adds
  • The Nature Of Ethics - 1,675 words
    The Nature Of Ethics The Nature of Ethics When asking the question about the nature of ethics, it is hard to explain where they came from because not everyone has the same views or religions. Since religions have different standards, there are different sources to them and different reasons for why people should follow them. When trying to find answers to questions about the nature of ethics, it is impossible to know which religion's view is correct. This paper will discuss the different views on the nature of ethics of three major religions: Hinduism, Christianity, and Buddhism. Before trying to explain ethics in Hinduism, one must first know the basic beliefs in it. The ultimate goal for H ...
    Related: christian ethics, ethics, important role, eightfold path, salvation
  • The Second Task Of Marriage - 1,337 words
    The Second Task Of Marriage John Coppola 4/26/00 THL 467 The Second Task of Marriage The following essay will attempt to explain in detail what exactly the second task of marriage entails. Procreation as a task of marriage seems to be a fairly simple and straight forward one at first, but to fully understand it, one must have a deep understanding of the Catholic notion of love, sexuality, embodiment, and other moral norms relevant to various aspects of this task of marriage. With regard to love, a married couple with the desire to have children of their own must have a certain type of unconditional love for each other before they are truly ready to have children. When talking about sexuality ...
    Related: second vatican, second vatican council, female sexuality, family planning, norms
  • Transformation By Marry Shelley - 850 words
    Transformation By Marry Shelley So you plant your own garden and decorate Your own soul, instead of waiting For someone to bring you flowers... (Unknown poet) The short story Transformation by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley is a confession of a man, who experiences supernatural adventure that completely changes his personality. One of the most important themes of the story is the struggle of good and evil in a soul of a person. This theme is topical at all times. Every person has his own sins, and he is able to estimate them only if he manages to take a detached view of himself. Happiness of a person depends on weather he is able to fight against dark side of his soul or not. Love and selfless ...
    Related: mary shelley, mary wollstonecraft shelley, shelley, transformation, wollstonecraft shelley
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