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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: divine

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  • Alighieri, Dante The Divine Comedy - 1,760 words
    Alighieri, Dante The Divine Comedy The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri (1265 - 1321) Type of Work: Allegorical religious poem Setting Hell, Purgatory and Paradise; A.D. 1300 Principal Characters Dante, the Pilgrim Virgil, the Poet, and Dante's guide Beatrice, Dante's womanly ideal and religious inspiration Story Overview Prologue: Dante, realizing he has strayed from the "true way,. into worldliness, tells of a vision where he travels through all the levels of Hell, up the mount of Purgatory, and finally through the realms of Paradise, where he is allowed a brief glimpse of God. The traveler sets out on the night before Good Friday, and finds himself in the middle of a dark wood. There he e ...
    Related: comedy, dante, dante alighieri, divine, divine comedy
  • Antigone: Divine Law Vs Human Law - 1,017 words
    Antigone: Divine Law vs. Human Law Antigone: Divine Law vs. Human Law The play entitled Antigone was written by a man named Sophocles, a scholarly author of philosophy and logic. The play Antigone is probably one of the most prominent interpretations of a tragic drama. The two main characters of the play are Antigone and Creon. There is much conflict between Antigone and Creon throughout the play, both of them having their own ideas and opinions regarding divine law versus human law. The theme that I am going to analyze is the conflict of divine law vs. human law. The reason for this is because this theme seems to control the whole play. It is an issue of which law is the "right" law, and if ...
    Related: divine, moral decision, king creon, tragic, logic
  • Antigone: Divine Law Vs Human Law - 1,034 words
    ... ne command over the human compulsion, and rejects life with it's compromises for the absolutes of death. Indeed, in her terms these absolutes are, paradoxically, just the things that live always (64). To Antigone, divine law is of more importance than human law. She bases herself on following the law that is set by the Gods. Antigone views morals and values very highly. Antigone meant well when she did what she did, but maybe she should have let the Gods vindicate their own laws (Waldock 111). By the end of the play Antigone is exonerated for having buried her brother Polyneices and also for going against the law that was set by Creon. Even though she had been excused for her actions, sh ...
    Related: divine, king creon, point of view, dream, entitled
  • Dante Alighieris The Divine Comedy, Purgatory - 1,426 words
    Dante Alighieri's The Divine Comedy, Purgatory Dante's The Divine Comedy section of Purgatory is a depiction of Dante and his struggle to reach paradise. He is a character as well as a narrator. The purgatory section deals with the seven deadly sins and Dante's task of cleansing himself on his journey to heaven. He confronts many different people on his journey to self-righteousness, which help and guide him to his destiny. Accompanied by Virgil or reason as he is depicted, his quest is a hard journey with many answers to be found. Dante was born in May 1265 and lived his early life at a time of change and of great economic and cultural expansion in Florence (Kirkpatrick 2). The poet was cri ...
    Related: dante, dante alighieri, divine, divine comedy, purgatory
  • Dantes Divine Comedy - 1,340 words
    Dante's Divine Comedy In Dante's Divine Comedy, Dante incorporates Virgil's portrayal of Hades from The Aeneid into his poem, and similarities between the Inferno and Hades can be drawn, however Dante wasn't attempting to duplicate Virgil's works. Although the Hell depicted in Dante's Inferno is essentially based on the literary construction of the underworld found in Virgil's Aeneid, in their particulars the two kingdoms are quite different. Virgil's underworld is largely undifferentiated, and Aeneas walks through it without taking any particular notice of the landscape or the quality of suffering that takes place among the dead. Aeneas' first concern is with the fate of his friends, then w ...
    Related: comedy, divine, divine comedy, historical figures, judas iscariot
  • Divine Command Theory - 712 words
    Divine Command Theory The Divine Command Theory Religion and ethics are seen to be somehow inseparable in our culture. Religious leaders are usually appealed to in some capacity when dealing with various moral and political problems. Their opinions are given great weight because they are thought to be in some kind of special relationship with God that the common person does not have. The view that God creates the moral law is often called the Divine Command Theory. According to this view, what makes an action right is that God desires it to be done. The divine command theory is the idea that moral actions are those which correspond to God's will. The simplest and most common form of the Divi ...
    Related: command, command theory, divine, divine command, religious leaders
  • Divine Dialogues: Comparing Job And Arjuna - 1,014 words
    Divine Dialogues: Comparing Job And Arjuna There is a distinct significance for humans forming a relationship with a higher being. To some, it may to be to establish a sense of self-gratification whereas to others it may be a form of help on their road to success. In either instance, forming the relationship helps in characterizing each person whether it is through personal dialogue or individual growth. The Book of Job and the Bhagavad-Gita are two texts that explore the characterization of two men under the instruction of a deity. By examining the significance of talking to the deity, Job and Arjuna are characterized through their relationship with the deity, personal spiritual quest, and ...
    Related: arjuna, comparing, divine, social responsibility, book of job
  • Human And Divine - 1,465 words
    Human And Divine 1) Introduction Through out history, as man progressed from a primitive animal to a "human being" capable of thought and reason, mankind has had to throw questions about the meaning of our own existence to ourselves. Out of those trail of thoughts appeared religion, art, and philosophy, the fundamental process of questioning about existence. Who we are, how we came to be, where we are going, what the most ideal state is....... All these questions had to be asked and if not given a definite answer, then at least given some idea as to how to begin to search for, as humans probed deeper and deeper into the riddle that we were all born into. As time passed, the works of many thi ...
    Related: divine, divine powers, human beings, human life, human race, human society
  • Hunger For The Divine - 322 words
    Hunger For The Divine "People long to go on pilgrimages, and pious wanderers to visit strange lands and far-off shrines in different countries." The Later Middle Ages were a time with many conflicting issues and positions. On one hand there was the church officials who were constantly fighting in their own ranks. The Great Schism is a great example of church quarreling. France and its satellite nations all recognized Clement VII while the rest of Europe agreed that Urban VI was the one true pope. On the other hand, religious reformers Eckhart who believed that if you renounced all sense of selfhood one could go back into your innermost recesses and God would be there. John Wyclif believed th ...
    Related: divine, hunger, european history, middle ages, conflicting
  • The Human And The Divine - 856 words
    The Human And The Divine 1) Introduction Through out history, as man progressed from a primitive animal to a human being capable of thought and reason, mankind has had to throw questions about the meaning of our own existence to ourselves. Out of those trail of thoughts appeared religion, art, and philosophy, the fundamental process of questioning about existence. Who we are, how we came to be, where we are going, what the most ideal state is....... All these questions had to be asked and if not given a definite answer, then at least given some idea as to how to begin to search for, as humans probed deeper and deeper into the riddle that we were all born into. As time passed, the works of ma ...
    Related: divine, divine powers, human beings, human life, human race, human society
  • 13 Were The Elizabethans More Bloodthirsty Or Tolerant Of - 1,210 words
    ... repulsiveness. His is a Dionysianism so passionately self-serving, so deliberate if not cold-blooded, that, corrosive rather than life-giving like the Dionysian at its best, it turns all not only to destruction but to cheapness, ignominy, pointlessness. -Theodore Weiss, The Breath of Clowns and Kings, 1974 - The great stories of murder are about men who could not have done it but who did. They are not murderers, they are men. And their stories will be better still when they are excellent men; not merely brilliant and admirable, but also, in portions of themselves which we infer rather than see. Richard is never quite human enough. The spectacle over which he presides with his bent back a ...
    Related: romeo and juliet, executive committee, the merchant of venice, artist, coriolanus
  • A Comparison Of Judaism, Islam, Christianity - 1,507 words
    A Comparison Of Judaism, Islam, & Christianity Religion is one of the driving forces behind many of the events and attitudes that have shaped our world. Throughout the centuries, laws have been enacted; cities and countries have been created and destroyed; and wars have been fought, all to promulgate or protect one religion or another. This paper will examine aspects of the three major Western religions of the world: Judaism, Islam, and Christianity. Topics covered will include the origin of all three religions, the view of God held by each tradition, and conflicts. Several of the beliefs of these religions will be examined, such as judgment, and the Trinity. Origin of Judaism The origins of ...
    Related: christianity, christianity and islam, christianity religion, comparison, great religions
  • A Comparison Of Judaism, Islam, Christianity - 1,589 words
    ... from their homes. Much persecution of Jews by Christians has been justified by the belief that the Jews were responsible for the death of Christ. In Nazi Germany and after the fall of the Third Reich, many Germans said that even though what happened to the Jews of Europe during World War Two was horrible, they did bring it on themselves because they were responsible for the death of Jesus. The Christian/Muslim conflicts began during the seventh century CE, with the fall of the Byzantine cities in Egypt and the Holy Land within ten years of the death of Muhammad. "Europeans watched in horror as the Holy Lands became Muslim and the "infidel" advanced into Spain" (Fisher, p.382). This Euro ...
    Related: christianity, comparison, great western, human beings, dependence
  • A Fairy Tale - 1,177 words
    A Fairy Tale A fairy tale. Ruby Red, a tale of deceit By Robyn Smith The winter in Argroutsmere had always set on early. It was October, all hallows eve and winter was already here, infact one of the coldest that this small quaint kingdom had ever seen. The trees turned to glass, their branches heavy in a frozen ache, layer upon layer of feather light crystals had gracefully drifted and floated from the heavens, to make this land as pure and white as above. The bear tracks below filling in slowly, the owner long passed. A blanket of fleece covered the earth, a barrier between warmth below and harsh cold above. The lake was of crystal, jewels hidden in the bushes, Sharp daggers of ice, hung f ...
    Related: fairy, fairy tale, tale, invisible hand, over time
  • A Literary Critique Of C S Lewis - 1,048 words
    A Literary Critique of C. S. Lewis A Literary Critique of C. S. Lewis: The Case for Christianity, The World's Last Night and Problem with Pain I. Introduction II. Brief Biographical Information III. The Case for Christianity - Right and Wrong as a Clue to the Meaning of the Universe IV. The Problem with Pain - Divine Omnipotence V. The World's Last Night - The Efficacy of Prayer VI. Conclusion A Critique of C. S. Lewis "A Relativist said, 'The world does not exist, England does not exist, Oxford does not exist and I am confident that I do not Exist!' When Lewis was asked to reply, he stood up and said, 'How am I to talk to a man who's not there?'" - C. S. Lewis: A Biography Clive Staples Lew ...
    Related: c. s. lewis, critique, lewis, literature and language, world war i
  • A Short History Of Antisemitism In Germany - 779 words
    A Short History of Anti-Semitism in Germany A Short History of Anti-Semitism in Germany The Second World War has left an unmistakable impression on the whole of Europe that will never be forgotten. Whether visible to the naked eye, or hidden in the consciousness of its people, the war has scarred Europe indelibly. Historically, the foremost recognizable perpetration against Europeans was Adolf Hitlers "Final Solution to the Jewish question". This sophisticated operation of systematic mass execution was calculated, organized, and carried out with such horrifying efficiency that only a madman could have been responsible for such an act, and Hitler was indeed mad. However, Anti-Semitism had bee ...
    Related: antisemitism, german history, germany, history, short history
  • A Sick Man's Precious Life - 1,043 words
    A Sick Man'S Precious Life Technology has been a part of everyone's life. It can be found everywhere, in homes, in education and even in the field of medicine. Technology lead to the further development of healing and curing. Because of it, doctors can cure patients more easily and effectively. However, technology is not always an advantage. It has brought several unacceptable ideas, one of which is the ending of a suffering patient's life. This is more popularly known as euthanasia. Euthanasia, from its Greek origin meaning easy death or dying well, is an action or omission which of itself or by intention caused death in order that all suffering may be eliminated. Euthanasia is more than ki ...
    Related: human life, precious, quality of life, holy book, nazi germany
  • A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning - 1,305 words
    A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning Intro to Poetry Oct 10 2000 Interpretation of A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning Although that it may seem that the meaning of A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning could be applied to any couple awaiting separation, according to Izaak Walton, a seventeenth-century biographer, John Donne wrote his poem for his wife, Anne Donne, right before his departure for France in 1611 (Damrosch 238). However, even though the poem is not written to an audience, many of us can learn from what Donne is trying to convey to his wife. In the poem, Donne pleads with his lady to accept his departure. He defines and celebrates a love that transcends the physical realm and expresse ...
    Related: mourning, middle ages, true meaning, john donne, greek
  • A Womans Role - 755 words
    A Woman's Role According to Judeo-Christian tradition, divine edict clearly relegates women to a position of subservience beneath men, as expressed in the Genesis creation account. This idea of female servility has dominated Western culture for thousands of years with virtually no significant changes; only in the past several decades has the notion of male dominance lost wide-spread acceptance in America. Prior to this cultural shift, American ideology mandated that women dutifully obey their husbands and confine themselves to managing the home and raising children, thus depriving them of any power beyond the sphere of the home and rendering them dependent on their husbands. This mentality i ...
    Related: female characters, mother maria, raising children, wiser, christian
  • A Worn Path - 1,321 words
    A Worn Path Eudora Weltys A Worn Path is a story that emphasizes the natural symbolism of the surroundings. As the story begins, we are introduced to our main character, Phoenix Jackson; she is described as a small, old Negro woman. I believe that the name Eudora Welty gives our main character is very symbolic. The legend of the Phoenix is about a fabled sacred bird of ancient Egyptians. The bird is said to come out of Arabia every 500 years to Heliopolis, where it burned itself on the altar and rose again from its ashes, young and beautiful. Phoenix, the women in the story, represents the myth of the bird because she is described as being elderly and near the end of her life. Phoenix can ha ...
    Related: a worn path, worn, worn path, phoenix jackson, main character
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