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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: diagnosis

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  • Diagnosis And Treatment Of Depression In The Elderly - 1,176 words
    Diagnosis and Treatment of Depression in the Elderly Mental disorders are becoming more prevalent in todays society as people add stress and pressure to their daily lives. The elderly population is not eliminated as a candidate for a disorder just because they may be retired. In fact, mental disorders affect 1 in 5 elderly people. One would think that with disorders being rather prevalent in this age group that there would be an abundance of treatment programs, but this is not the case. Because the diagnosis of an individuals mental state is subjective in nature, many troubled people go untreated regularly (summer 1998). Depression in the elderly population is a common occurrence, yet the di ...
    Related: diagnosis, elderly, elderly people, treating depression, treatment of depression, treatment programs
  • Diagnosis And Treatment Of Depression In The Elderly - 1,185 words
    ... nitive therapy on elderly depressed patients. In addition to the success, "the US National Institute of Health consensus conference highlighted the need for continued development in this area (January 1997)." The types of psychological treatments used on the elderly are specifically designed for aged persons. The central idea in cognitive therapy is to take the negative self-opinion and teach ways to reverse this opinion. Validation and reminiscence are examples of techniques used to get the patient to reflect on the accomplishments of his or her lifetime. Hopefully, this will bring back some pleasant memories of family or other accomplishments. It also allows the patient to look at the ...
    Related: diagnosis, elderly, elderly people, elderly persons, treating depression, treatment of depression, treatment options
  • Diagnosis Of Patience - 1,151 words
    Diagnosis Of Patience Jennifer came to me several failed visits and theripys through out her teen years. She had, like it past reports complained of "always feeling worried and anxious". She often talked on how going out to social settings and relationships was so difficult. Believing that it was her fate to always be alone. She felt very uncomfortable around crowds as if they would turn on her in angry or disapproval. Jennifer had came to me after a referral from a mutual friend of mine. One that she had built a friendship with the current job that she had worked continuously for 2 yrs. Past History: Talking about her past relationships, I found she hadn't been intimate with any single pers ...
    Related: diagnosis, patience, social skills, short term, dread
  • History Diagnosis And Treatment Of Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis - 1,575 words
    History Diagnosis And Treatment Of Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis HISTORY DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF EQUINE PROTOZOAL MYELOENCEPHALITIS. Equine Protozoal Myeloencepalitis is a serious neurological disease in horses caused by a parasite protozoa thought to be sarcosystis neurona. The disease was first identified in the 1960's when lesions and inflammation were seen in the brain and spinal cords of horses that had died of severe neurologic disease. Protozoa were discovered on the lesions in 1974, however the vector was unknown and the disease considered rare. Recently the opossum has been isolated as the probable vector and the likely parasite organism identified as Sarcosystis falcatula. ...
    Related: diagnosis, equine, history, best method, early stages
  • 32 Doctors Later Still No Cure - 316 words
    32 Doctors Later Still No Cure Theres no way to describe the feeling of helplessness. Since I was a little girl, I can remember my mothers illness. I can remember her playing with us, regardless of how much pain she was in, just because she cared that much. Now Im eighteen, and the same woman still pushes aside her health to be a part of my life. I cannot describe the frustrations! 32 doctors later, still there is no cure, for her illness. After her diagnosis was read, she was referred to a chronic pain therapist. My mothers goals consist of getting out of bed, and eating. If she can accomplish these few things, her day is complete. The feeling is unsurpassable to me that my mother must live ...
    Related: cure, chronic pain, unfortunate, pray
  • A Comparison Of Freud And Fromm - 1,277 words
    A Comparison Of Freud And Fromm Sigmund Freud was born in Monrovia on May 6,1856. He entered the University of Vienna in 1873 at the age of 17. He finished his degree in 1881. Freud died in England in 1939. He was an active therapist, theorist and writer to the very end. ( Ewen 19-20) Erich Fromm was born four years after Freud in 1900 in Frankfurt, Germany. Unlike Freud, Fromm had no medical training in his background. He received his PHD from the University of Heidelberg and later studied at Berlin Psychoanalytic Institute. Erich Fromm died March 16, 1980 in Switzerland. (Ewen 187) While Freud and Fromm were contemporaries and shared some basic beliefs, their approach to most issues varied ...
    Related: comparison, erich fromm, freud, fromm, sigmund freud
  • A Journey With Breast Cancer - 1,368 words
    A Journey With Breast Cancer A Journey with Breast Cancer What is Cancer? The body is made up of many types of cells. Normally, cells grow and divide to produce more cells only when the body needs them. This is an orderly process which keeps the body healthy. Sometimes cells keep dividing when new cells are not needed. They may form a mass of extra tissue called a growth or tumor. Benign tumors are not a threat to life but malignant tumors are cancer. Cells in these tumors can invade and damage nearby tissues and organs. The fear is that cancer cells can break away from a malignant tumor and enter the bloodstream or lymphatic system. That is how breast cancer spreads and forms other tumors i ...
    Related: breast, breast cancer, cancer, cancer institute, national cancer, national cancer institute
  • Abnormal Psychology Problem: Excessive Use Of Marijuana And Alcohol - 717 words
    Abnormal Psychology Problem: Excessive Use Of Marijuana And Alcohol Case Study Abnormal Psychology Problem Excessive use of marijuana and alcohol, especially within the last 2 years. Kurt began drinking and using marijuana at age 14 and by age 15 referred to the usage as heavy. Despite recently being caught for the theft of his parents TYME card and $400, which resulted in him being forced to join an AODA group, he still continues to use on a regular basis. He has also gone to work while intoxicated and attended a school dance under the influence of marijuana. As a result he was fired from his job and had to undergo a urine screen in order to again be allowed back into his particular school. ...
    Related: abnormal, abnormal psychology, alcohol, excessive, marijuana, psychology
  • Abstract On Rose Diseases - 2,112 words
    ... by 1970, most of the garden roses in the United States were infected. Since then, heat therapy programs have been initiated at the Oregon State University and the University of California at Davis, as well as by Bear Creek (parent company of Jackson & Perkins Roses and Armstrong Roses). The Oregon State program is now nearly defunct. Some commercial rose nurseries have made use of those programs and now offer virus-free plants for sale. However, many nurseries have not made any attempt to provide healthy plants, and a large percentage of the roses grown and sold in Florida are infected. Florida nurseries using Fortuniana as a rootstock are at a particular disadvantage, since scion-source ...
    Related: abstract, washington state university, state university, washington state, sending
  • Add - 1,362 words
    Add Attention Deficit Disorder For centuries children have been grounded, beaten, or even killed for ignoring the rules or not listening to what they're told. In the past it was thought these "bad" kids were the products of bad parenting, bad environment, or simply being stubborn, however it is now known that many of these children may have had Attention Deficit Disorder, or A. D. D., and could've been helped. A. D. D. is a syndrome that affects millions of children and adults in the United States and is a very frustrating and confusing syndrome that often goes undiagnosed. While there is no clear-cut definition of A. D. D., it's known that it's a genetic disorder that affects males more oft ...
    Related: manic depression, negative aspects, prison population, instantly
  • Addadhd - 1,128 words
    ADD/ADHD Factual Data Attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD) refers to a group of symptoms that begin in infancy and can continue into adulthood, causing difficulties for people at home, at school, at their jobs, and within their communities. The severity of symptoms varies among people with ADHD. Some people have difficulty with overactivity (hyperactivity), while others have difficulty remembering, thinking, making judgments, and solving problems. The most common symptom of ADHD is difficulty remaining focused on a task until it is completed. People with ADHD have a hard time completing tasks that are boring, repetitive, or difficult for them. Many people with ADHD have trouble cont ...
    Related: deficit hyperactive disorder, social behavior, personal relationships, relationships, norepinephrine
  • Adhd - 931 words
    Adhd Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common mental disorders among children. About 3 percent to 5 percent of American children are affected by this disorder. This disorder is commonly mis-diagnosed in children who are very hyperactive, assuming that very hyperactive kids have this disorder. In this paper I plan to discuss ideas such as: the symptoms, theories of causation, risks, and how this disorder is looked at and treated. There are signs that a child may be affected by ADHD, which are very noticeable in some cases. Some of the physical symptoms that are involved include hyperactivity, inattention, and impulsitiv ...
    Related: adhd, television watching, hyperactivity disorder, food additives, complicated
  • Adhd: Parents Should Use Alternative Treatments For Illness - 1,232 words
    Adhd: Parents Should Use Alternative Treatments For Illness ADHD: Parents Should Use Alternative Treatments for Illness A child named Alva comes to mind. Alva's teacher taught by rote, which was too mechanical for the boy's creative mind. His thoughts often wandered, while his body seemed in perpetual motion in his seat. The teacher found Alva, inattentive and unruly and often threatened punishment. Alva, fearful and out of place, ran away from school (Robbins 2). The preceding quote is an example of a student that lived many years ago that would most likely be diagnosed today with ADHD. There is an increasing debate on the subject of using prescription drugs to treat the condition of Attent ...
    Related: illness, medical news, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, high blood pressure, medicalization
  • Adjustment Disorder With Depressed Mood - 1,468 words
    Adjustment Disorder With Depressed Mood Running Head: ADJUSTMENT DISORDER WITH DEPRESSED MOOD CAUSE Adjustment Disorder with Depressed Mood, Cause and Affect Abstract Research was conducted to investigate Adjustment Disorder with Depressed Mood, and some causes, affects, and treatment approaches. Not all individuals manifest or demonstrate the same depressive symptoms, which can make it difficult for clinicians to diagnose and treat. The American Psychiatric Association has categorized various depressive disorders in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders fourth edition (DSM-IV, 1994). Researchers have investigated the validity of the DSM diagnostic criteria over the year ...
    Related: adjustment, depressed, disorder, mood, treating depression
  • Advances In Medicine - 1,318 words
    Advances In Medicine As the history of medicine has evolved, a number of trends and prevailing opinions have swept the profession. One of the most subtle, and yet most revealing results of these sweeping trends manifests itself by altering the tone in medical conversations and dialogues, often available to the non-medical person in the form of texts and literature. A relatively current example appears in the form of Perri Klass A Not Entirely Benign Procedure, a text dedicated to the experiences of the author at Harvard Medical School. Published in 1987, Klass work offers an interesting, if not shocking comparison to Philippe Pinels The Clinical Training of Doctors, an article published in 1 ...
    Related: medicine, modern medicine, personal perspective, patient care, enthusiasm
  • Aids - 1,103 words
    Aids Aids Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), suppresses the immune system related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). A person infected with HIV gradually loses immune function along with certain immune cells called CD4 T-lymphocytes or CD4 T-cells, causing the infected person to become vulnerable to pneumonia, fungus infections, and other common ailments. With the loss of immune function, a clinical syndrome (a group of various illnesses that together characterize a disease) develops over time and eventually results in death due to opportunistic infections (infections by organisms that do not normally cause disease except in people whose immune systems have be ...
    Related: aids, deficiency syndrome, human immunodeficiency, acquired immune, bacterial
  • Aids - 1,140 words
    ... f the mouth by the fungus Candida Albicans, is common in the early symptomatic phase of AIDS. Other infectious fungi include species of the genus Cryptococcus, a major cause of Meningitis in up to 13 percent of people with AIDS. Also, infection by the fungus Histoplasma Capsulatum affects up to 10 percent of people with AIDS, causing general weight loss, fever, and respiratory complications or severe central nervous system complications if the infection reaches the brain. Viral opportunistic infections, especially with members of the Herpes virus family, are common in people with AIDS. One Herpes family member, Cytomegalovirus (CMV), infects the retina of the eye and can result in blindn ...
    Related: aids, blood cells, nervous system, human cells, nose
  • Aids - 1,140 words
    ... rom a few days to several weeks and is associated with fever, sweats, exhaustion, loss of appetite, nausea, headaches, soar throat, diarrhea, swollen glands, and a rash on the torso. Some of the symptoms of the acute illness may result from HIV-1 invasion of the central nervous system. In some cases the clinical findings have correlated with the presence of HIV-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid. Symptoms disappear along with the rash and other sings of acute viral disease. When the blood test for HIV-1 antibodies become available, researchers demonstrated the lymphadenopathy was a frequent consequence of infection with the virus. Scientist do not know what causes the wasting syndrome, but som ...
    Related: aids, immune system, human immunodeficiency, recent studies, regulation
  • Aids - 1,410 words
    Aids Aids by sean ross How is HIV Diagnosed? You can get tested for HIV in a number of locations -- including public clinics, AIDS organizations, physicians' offices, and hospitals. Many locations give the test for free. You can choose between anonymous tests, in which you do not give your name to the HealthCare provider, or confidential tests, in which you do give your name. Test sites should provide trained counselors who can offer you support and guidance, no matter what the test result.(Balch-97) An HIV test looks for the antibodies your immune system creates in response to the virus. These antibodies may not appear in your blood until three to six months after HIV infection. Therefore, ...
    Related: aids, aids hiv, aids research, disease control, santa monica
  • Aids In Africa - 1,109 words
    Aids In Africa As recently as 1990, there were some regions of the world that had remained relatively unscathed by AIDS. Today, however, there is not a single country around the world which has wholly escaped the AIDS epidemic. As the epidemic has matured, some of the developed nations which were hard hit by the epidemic in the 1980s such as the United States have reported a slowing in the rate of new infections and a stabilization among existing cases with lower mortality rates and an extension of post-diagnosis lifespan. However, despite the changing face of the global AIDS pandemic, one factor remains unchanged: no region of the world bears a higher AIDS-related burden than sub-Saharan Af ...
    Related: africa, aids, aids epidemic, east africa, saharan africa, sub-saharan africa, west africa
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