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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: developing world

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  • Causes Of Poverty In The Developing World - 707 words
    Causes Of Poverty In The Developing World The causes of poverty in the developing world Wars Many LDC's have been badly affected by wars. There have been many civil wars in Africa, caused by European empire-building in the nineteenth century. Several African races were joined into one country, but half a race was left in another country. These countries were still artificial countries after they achieved independence. One race was often badly treated by the ruling race, which resulted in civil war. This also happened in Europe since the various parts of Yugoslavia were given independence. LDC's also suffer from wars between different countries, such as: Ethiopia and Somalia, Afghanistan and ...
    Related: developed world, developing world, modern world, poverty, second world, world leaders, world market
  • Argentinas Economy - 1,095 words
    Argentina`s Economy Argentina lives in a democracy since 1986. Before this year lived it under a military regime. In the nineties under the presidency of Menem the country experienced a great increase in the liberalization of trade. Argentina has a free market economic system. Due to the recent privatization program, the State now has a very limited role in the economy. According to the Competitiveness Report of the World Economic Forum Argentina is classified as one of the most open, least protectionist countries in the world. Its currency is convertible to the US dollars and there is total freedom for moving capital internationally. Argentina has conducted one of the most intensive privati ...
    Related: economy, united kingdom, south america, world bank, telephone
  • Bibliography: This Is My First Biology Paper My Major Is Psychology I Attend An University In Maryland Parttime I Am A Colleg - 1,764 words
    Bibliography: This is my first Biology paper. My major is Psychology. I attend an university in Maryland part-time. I am a college Sophomore. I work in Communications. UNDERSTANDING THE AIDS VIRUS Will I live to see tomorrow? Is there a hope for the future? These are probably the most commonly asked questions among AIDS patients today. This paper delves into the heart of the AIDS topic by giving a detailed definition of the virus, risk factors associated with transmission, and the best treatment methods studied by the Centers for Disease Control, the National Institutes of Health, and other research organizations. AIDS. The word alone strikes fear into every sexually active individual. Why i ...
    Related: attend, biology, maryland, psychology, san francisco
  • Cambodia - 1,983 words
    Cambodia The Impact of the Past on the Present Cambodia, then, like so many other nations in the developing world, is an agricultural country, and, in terms of the cash incomes of its people, desperately poor. In the past, Cambodia was able to earn foreign exchange to pay for imported goods by selling agricultural surpluses-of rice and corn, for example-or plant crops, such as pepper, rubber, and cotton. Its normal patterns of trade were broken up in the wars of the 1970's. When the fighting died down, Cambodian trade became lively again, but more informal, which benefited many individual traders but deprived the government of money it needed to pay for essential services, like electricity, ...
    Related: cambodia, prime minister, khmer rouge, peace process, reject
  • Canadian Foreign Aid: A Return To Past Ways - 1,609 words
    Canadian Foreign Aid: A Return To Past Ways The Cold War and decolonization in Asia framed Canada's decision in 1950 to offer capital and technical assistance through the Colombo Plan for Co-operative Economic Development in South and Southeast Asia. Since then, Canada has disbursed over $40 billion in official development assistance (ODA) to countries in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, and Latin America. A reserved player in Western aid efforts in the 1950s, the Canadian government became more enthusiastic in the 1960s, a time of optimism, idealism, and prosperity when support for international development captured the imagination of growing numbers of Canadians . During the late 1980s, Canada ...
    Related: canadian, canadian dollar, canadian government, foreign aid, past years
  • Challenges Facing Urban Transport In Asia Construction - 1,552 words
    - Challenges Facing Urban Transport In Asia - Construction CHALLENGES FACING URBAN TRANSPORT IN ASIA Abstract- One of the greatest challenges facing the new millennium is to effect a well integrated and environmentally acceptable solution for urban transportation. In spite of many decades of studies, involving research and experiments, success has often been elusive and more importantly, there is still a lack of consensus of what constitutes an acceptable integrated transport policy within the urban fabric The paper analyses the global trend towards urbanisation and demonstrates that while there are megacites throughout the world,there is a concentration of them in the Asian region and that ...
    Related: asia, challenges facing, construction, facing, transport, urban, urban areas
  • Clockworks Orange - 633 words
    Clockworks Orange In the 1960's our developing world faces many of it's impurities. The youth of this nation fight for equal right, equality of the races and freedom of speech. But not all the protests are legal. Many people are guilty of treason and must be punished but with an over crowded prison system were will these political prisoners be sent. The common criminals are flooding the system with there petty robbers, assaults and murders. We need to deal with the common criminal before we can deal with the political. The novel The Clockwork Orange written by Anthony Burgess depicts the life of a child of the night (Alex). Him and his droogs (friends) see life as something worthless as they ...
    Related: clockwork orange, orange, anthony burgess, prison system, robber
  • Ebola Hemoragic Fever - 924 words
    Ebola Hemoragic Fever Viral hemorrhagic fevers are a group of diseases caused by viruses from four families of viruses: filoviruses, arenaviruses, flaviviruses, and bunyaviruses. The usual hosts for most of these viruses are rodents or arthropods (such as ticks and mosquitoes). In some cases, such as Ebola virus, the natural host for the virus is unknown. All forms of viral hemorrhagic fever begin with fever and muscle aches. Depending on the particular virus, the disease can progress until the patient becomes very ill with respiratory problems, severe bleeding, kidney problems, and shock. The severity of viral hemorrhagic fever can range from a mild illness to death. The Ebola virus is a me ...
    Related: ebola, ebola virus, fever, hemorrhagic fever, central african
  • Economics In Asia - 1,143 words
    Economics In Asia PG 109:Global Perspectives on Development Pacific Asia's Changing Fortunes in the Global Economy since 1970 by Toby Bromley Since the mid 1960s, Pacific Asia has had a remarkable rate of economic growth. This growth has been sustainable and faster than all other regions of the world (see fig. 1). This region consists of twenty-three economies but it was just eight who caused most of this amazing growth. The eight were Hong Kong, the Republic of Korea, Singapore, Taiwan, China, (the "Four Tigers") Japan and the newly industrialised economies (NIEs) of south-east Asia, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Thailand. The eight high performing Asian economies (HPAEs) mentioned here will be ...
    Related: asia, east asia, economic growth, economics, south-east asia
  • Global Imbalance In Food Supply - 646 words
    Global Imbalance In Food Supply Right now, developing countries are starving to death and the developed countries are worried about which type of cheese they should buy. This is called an imbalance in food supply. There's too much food in the developed countries, and not enough in the developing countries. Three quarters of the world's population is inadequately fed and the majority of these live in the developing countries. Massive surpluses exist in Europe and the US. Malnutrition and undernutrition is generally caused by poverty. Markets in the developed countries are often too big and produce too much food for a population to consume. Developed countries' agriculture is lacking from unem ...
    Related: food production, food security, food supply, imbalance, national income
  • Globalization - 1,405 words
    Globalization What are the function and problems within the globalization process? Globalization creates new challenges and opportunities for those people who are of greatest concern to the Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement - that is, the Disadvantaged. The humanitarian players - that is, the UN system and its organisations, the Red Cross Red Crescent, NGOs - have several roles to play in relation to globalization. We should monitor the impact of globalization and help governments to strengthen safety nets and provide basic social services. We must reinforce our efforts to address the needs of vulnerable people and we must adapt our methods of assistance and do all we can to prevent additi ...
    Related: globalization, eastern europe, civil society, economic effect, macro
  • Human Rights - 1,635 words
    Human Rights Human Rights in the New Millennium Human rights issues are taking on new focus in the new millennium. Economic and social rights are a paramount concern as the link between adequate and inadequate living standards. Governmental and non-governmental organizations are realizing that some countries take precedent over other countries when it comes to human rights. In the new millennium, cases that violate human rights are being taken more serious than ever before. International prosecution against individuals and corporations will take place if human rights charges are brought against them. Human rights have been an issue in the international community since the beginning of time. ...
    Related: bill of rights, cultural rights, human development, human rights, human rights violations, inalienable rights, international human
  • Hurricanes 2 - 1,565 words
    Hurricanes 2 Hurricanes A natural hazard is when extreme events which cause great loss of life and or property and create severe disruption to human lives, such as a hurricane. Editor Philip Whitefield brings up an important point in Our Mysterious Planet when he comments; At a time when we know how to aim a space probe directly at Mars and trigger the gigantic forces of nuclear power, we are still at the mercy of hurricanes and volcanoes. It seems peculiar how we can be at such an advanced stage technologically yet we are unable to completely stop a natural hazard from causing loss of life and damage to existing constructed resources and infrastructures. Hurricane Gilbert, September 1998 w ...
    Related: hurricanes, less developed countries, san antonio, nuclear power, coast
  • I Am Writing A Report About Fidel Castro He Is Famous For Taking - 355 words
    I am writing a report about Fidel Castro. He is famous for taking Control of Cuba in 1959 and established a communist dictatorship. He was Born in Mayari on August 13,1927. As a boy he worked in his family sugar Plantation. Castro went to the University of Havana in 1945 and got his Degree in law in 1950. Castro married Mirta Diaz Balart. They only had one Son and soon after they had their son his wife divorced him in 1955. As a Lawyer he defended the poor and he was a candidate for the Cuban Congress. He did not get in congress because Batista canceled the elections. Castro and His brother Raul bought guns out of their pockets for 150 people. They Assaulted an army barracks in Santiago de C ...
    Related: castro, fidel, fidel castro, soviet union, u.s. foreign policy
  • Imperialism - 1,550 words
    Imperialism Throughout time more powerful countries have extended their influence over weaker countries and then colonized those countries to expand their own power. Imperialism causes the stronger countries to grow and become nations or even empires. There are many examples throughout European history of nations enveloping weaker countries and increasing their own wealth and power to form strong nation-states and even empires. Through imperialism one culture is invading another culture and most of the time the European colonialists are not thinking about the effects this invasion might have on the natives of that land. Problems caused by imperialism have prevailed to this day. Imperialism c ...
    Related: european imperialism, imperialism, multimedia encyclopedia, great britain, implement
  • Indian Music - 648 words
    Indian Music 1) Music is the organisation of sounds with some degree of rhythm, melody, and harmony. 2) Popular Music is music produced for and sold to a broad audience. Indian popular music, which is most strongly influenced by Indian folk music is shaped by social, economic, and technological forces. Popular music is closely linked to the social identity of its performers and audiences. 3) Indian Popular Music has one of the worlds most extensive popular music industries. Most Indian popular music is associated with the commercial film industry, centred on Mumbai, in which song-and-dance scenes are inserted into plots. 4) Film songs are heard all over India, in city streets and even in rem ...
    Related: folk music, indian, indian music, music, music industry, popular music
  • Internet Privacy - 1,064 words
    Internet Privacy One of the most important advances in the rapidly developing world of electronic commerce is the ability of companies to develop personalized relationships with their customers. Personalization empowers companies to better understand their customers' wants and desires and improve customer service by tailoring offerings to the unique needs of individuals . At the same time, this has become a subject of hot controversy because the technology involves the extensive collection and use of personal data. Many, if not most, online shoppers and surfers are not aware of the extent of how much and what kind of info can be gathered about a person, even someone who is just visiting and ...
    Related: internet privacy, internet users, invasion of privacy, privacy, privacy policy, privacy protection
  • Learning To Flycast - 805 words
    Learning To Flycast The great outdoors is a provider of a vast variety of ways to relax. These methods can range from camping to hiking to even snow skiing. Though the most effective way to escape from the world and into nature is through fly-fishing. Fly-fishing can place you in the middle of a peaceful stream but yet on the outskirts of a developing world. Although learning to fly fish involves detailed steps and may be time consuming, it is guaranteed to bring you peacefulness and relaxation. The well explained steps provided will teach you the art of fly fishing in a timely manner. First, you must make sure that you have the right equipment. You will need a fly rod, a reel, and fly line. ...
    Related: developing world, most effective, retrieve, skiing
  • Mexico - 3,526 words
    ... to import finished automobiles (although they were required to earn US$2.50 in automobile exports for every US$1 spent on imports). In the early 1980s, automobile exports increased as domestic demand fell. Export growth leveled off in the early 1990s as the domestic market recovered. Growth of total vehicle output slowed from 21 percent in 1991 to 9 percent in 1992. In 1994 vehicle production totaled more than 1 million units, of which 850,000 were cars. Production fell by 16 percent between January and November 1995. During those months, exports rose by 37 percent to 700,000 units, while domestic sales fell by 70 percent, to 140,000 units. Textiles, clothing, and footwear together acco ...
    Related: mexico, mexico city, northern mexico, general agreement, trade relations
  • Motivation - 1,312 words
    Motivation The need for action is pressing in order to feed the expanding human population, expected to increase by almost one billion people per decade for the next three decades at least. Much of this increase will occur in developing countries in the low-latitude regions of the world. To meet the associated food demand, crop yields will need to increase, consistently, by over 2% every year through this period. Most research on agriculture and climate change has focused on potential impacts on regional and global food production, yet few studies have considered how global warming may affect food security. Food security has been defined as access by all people at all times to enough food fo ...
    Related: motivation, population growth, trade liberalization, beneficial effects, inhibit
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