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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: declare

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  • I Declare My Independence From Homework - 434 words
    I Declare My Independence from Homework In class, October 22, 1997. The almost unanimous declaration of the two-thousand students of Glenbard West High School. We declare our independence from any homework; we will no longer tolerate its injustice. When in the course of scholastic events, it becomes necessary to discontinue certain ineffective practices that have limited the extra-curricular activities of the student bodies, we, the students are forced to speak out against these practices,and rebel for the greater good of humanity. I, therefore, have been chosen to convey to the faculty the reasons to discontinue the practice, and in doing so to justify the pending rebellion. Homework causes ...
    Related: declare, homework, subject matter, high school, inter
  • 12 Angry Men - 801 words
    12 Angry Men Every person may have his own way of defining the term "reasonable doubt." In the play "Twelve Angry Men", by Reginald Rose, one juror, number Eight, stands alone against 11 others to convince them that the boy is not guilty. He looks beyond the given testimonies in order to give the boy a fair trial, though this is more then the others think the boy deserves. If the jury finds a "reasonable doubt", it must declare an innocent verdict. A young man stands accused of fatally stabbing his father, and his fate now lies in the hands of his "peers:" 12 men from all walks of life, each with his own agenda, fears and personal demons. At first, based on their conversation, it seems that ...
    Related: angry, twelve angry, reasonable doubt, reginald rose, cars
  • A Comparison Of The Themes Of Thomas Wyatt And Henry Howard - 745 words
    A comparison of the themes of Thomas Wyatt and Henry Howard Both Henry Howard and Thomas Wyatt made significant contributions towards the development of English literature during the reign of King Henry VIII. Through their translations of Petrarchs work, these men were responsible for introducing sonnet form into English. "Both Wyatt and Surrey helped to change the nature of English poetry,"(textbook, p.187). They both traveled to Italy and borrowed, as well as imitated other poets and each other. Instead of originating fresh themes, they repeated conventional subject matter, mainly focusing on idealized love. Works from both poets had similar themes of confusion, sadness, and reflection. Bo ...
    Related: comparison, henry viii, howard, king henry, king henry viii, main theme, thomas wyatt
  • A Living Organization Changes With Time Some Parts Of It May Remain Identical To That Which Was First Constructed Most Parts - 1,785 words
    A living organization changes with time. Some parts of it may remain identical to that which was first constructed. Most parts will adapt to changes in the world, in society, and in mankind itself. If it does not change, it withers and dies. Organizations which fail to adapt to changes, whether they like it or not, tend to become shrunken relics of their original selves. They become mummified images of a once living creation. Such an organization is the Ku Klux Klan, better known as the KKK. The Ku Klux Klan is one of the most hateful groups that still exists today. They are not as strong as they once were, but still pose a threat. I believe that the KKK should have never been formed because ...
    Related: identical, north carolina, after world, small town, threatening
  • A Sick Man's Precious Life - 1,043 words
    A Sick Man'S Precious Life Technology has been a part of everyone's life. It can be found everywhere, in homes, in education and even in the field of medicine. Technology lead to the further development of healing and curing. Because of it, doctors can cure patients more easily and effectively. However, technology is not always an advantage. It has brought several unacceptable ideas, one of which is the ending of a suffering patient's life. This is more popularly known as euthanasia. Euthanasia, from its Greek origin meaning easy death or dying well, is an action or omission which of itself or by intention caused death in order that all suffering may be eliminated. Euthanasia is more than ki ...
    Related: human life, precious, quality of life, holy book, nazi germany
  • A Stereotypical Media - 1,258 words
    A Stereotypical Media A Stereotypical Media The media of todays society plays the peddler to the stereotypes that plague our country. However, the media is not solely to blame. Susan Sontag states in her essay The Image World: Through being photographed, something becomes part of a system of information, fitted into schemes of classification and storage(Sontag 196). Through our own demand as consumers, the use of advertising in television, newspapers, and especially magazines relays to the public an erratic system of stereotypical information. The system of information relayed through photographic imagery in advertising directly affects the thoughts of society, on how a woman should look and ...
    Related: media, stereotypical, american worker, men and women, plant
  • Abortion - 1,964 words
    Abortion One of the most controversial topics over the years, and still today, is abortion. Is abortion murder or not? When does a fetus become a human? There are no answers to these questions. Everyone individual has their own beliefs on whether or not abortion is justifiable. Abortions have been performed throughout many of centuries. Recently, there has been a number of court cases that has changed the legality of abortions, especially in the United States, for example Roe v. Wade. Even religions have changed their views on abortions over the course of the years. In the abortions wars there are two parties, pro-life and pro-choice. Pro-life believes that abortion is murder and is complete ...
    Related: abortion, abortion laws, partial birth abortion, partial-birth abortion, stress disorder
  • Abortion Ethics - 1,399 words
    Abortion Ethics On the question of abortion being moral, the answer is clearly that terminating a fetus' life under certain circumstances is not only moral, but it is also our responsibility to terminate it if the quality of life is in question for the fetus. A second major reason is that to declare abortion immoral would mean that we would have to consider the factor of how the conception came about. This cannot and should not be done. Quality is a major factor in the question of the morality of abortion. When parents decide to keep or not keep a baby the issue of adoption does not play into this. The reason for this is that once the baby is born that the parents may change their mind if th ...
    Related: abortion, ethics, morality of abortion, point of view, human life
  • Abraham Lincoln - 1,920 words
    Abraham Lincoln Abraham Lincoln was born on February 12, 1809 in Kentucky. When he was two, the Lincolns moved a few miles to another farm on the old Cumberland Trail. A year later, his mother gave birth to another boy, Thomas, but he died a few days later. When Lincoln was seven his family moved to Indiana. In 1818, Lincolns mother died from a deadly disease called the "milk-sick." Then ten years later his sister died and left him with only his father and stepmother. Lincoln traveled to New Salem in April 1831 and settled there the following July. In the fall of 1836 he and Mrs. Bennett Abell had a deal that if she brought her single sister to New Salem he had to promise to marry her. When ...
    Related: abraham, abraham lincoln, lincoln, john wilkes booth, president johnson
  • Acts And Theophilus - 5,304 words
    Acts And Theophilus 1. Theophilus Lover of God, a Christian, probably a Roman, to whom Luke dedicated both his Gospel and the Acts of the Apostles. Nothing beyond this is known of him. From the fact that Luke applies to him the title "most excellent", the same title Paul uses in addressing Felix and Festus, it has been concluded that Theophilus was a person of rank, perhaps a Roman officer (Henneke). 2. John the Baptist John was Jesus cousin. He was to prepare a way for the messiah by baptizing people into repentance. He is only mentioned in Acts in passing. He had been murdered by King Herod years before. 3. Jesus He is the suffering servant, the messiah. He is God in flesh. He is the main ...
    Related: first century, lord jesus, kingdom of god, diana, persuade
  • Adolf Hitler - 1,265 words
    ... s of Zion were published in the local anti-Semitic newspaper. The false, but alarming accusations reinforced Hitler's anti-Semitism. Soon after, treatment of the Jews was a major theme of Hitler's orations, and the increasing scapegoating of the Jews for inflation, political instability, unemployment, and the humiliation in the war, found a willing audience. Jews were tied to internationalism by Hitler. The name of the party was changed to the National Socialist German Worker's party, and the red flag with the swastika was adopted as the party symbol. A local newspaper which appealed to anti-Semites was on the verge of bankruptcy, and Hitler raised funds to purchase it for the party. In ...
    Related: adolf, adolf hitler, hitler, benito mussolini, soviet union
  • Adoptive V Birth Parents Legal Rights - 938 words
    Adoptive V. Birth Parents' Legal Rights Adoptive v. Birth Parents' Rights This issue hits home with me, I am adopted. I believe that a child's parents are the people who raise them and take care of them. I do not believe that birth parents have any rights to their children after the child has been adopted and living with their adoptive parents. The biological parents made a decision when they put the child up for adoption, for whatever the reason may have been. Just because they feel that their lives are more stable and together does not give them the right to rip a child from the only parents that child knows. By doing this the biological parents destroy not only the life of the child but a ...
    Related: adoptive, legal issues, legal rights, child custody, traditional values
  • All Quiet On The Western Front - 985 words
    All Quiet On The Western Front "All Quiet on the Western Front" is a novel written by Erich Maria Remarque. It is a war novel that tells the story of a young man and his experiences in combat during World War I. The title of the novel roots from a phrase used to describe the silence between shellings and infantry attacks during the battles fought on the western front ( Text, 895 ). Although World War I was a very real event, the testaments of the main character in "All Quiet on the Western Front" is purely fictional, but they are based on the accounts of veterans of the war. In order to understand most of the events that took place in the novel it is essential to understand how the war erupt ...
    Related: all quiet on the western front, quiet, german army, facing death, advance
  • All The Pretty Horses - 638 words
    All The Pretty Horses John Grady Cole, the last in a long line of west Texas ranchers, is, at sixteen, poised on the sorrowful, painful edge of manhood. When he realizes the only life he has ever known is disappearing into the past and that cowboys are as doomed as the Comanche who came before them, he leaves on a dangerous and harrowing journey into the beautiful and utterly foreign world that is Mexico. In the guise of a classic Western, All the Pretty Horses is at its heart a lyrical and elegiac coming-of-age story about love, friendship, and loyalty that will leave John Grady, and the reader, changed forever. When his mother decides to sell the cattle ranch he has grown up working, John ...
    Related: horses, great american, patron, stark
  • American Skinheads - 1,135 words
    ... of these groups is going to declare war (Anonymous 62). Indeed, an individual who espouses racial intolerance as part and parcel of being a human being is not an individual many others would appreciate being around, that is unless the other person shares the same inclination toward white supremacy. The challenge of living among diversity is to construe morality in such a way that it is flexible enough to accommodate very diverse circumstances and life-styles, but not yet to give up on a vision of a shared conception of the good life. An ethic of responsibility challenges us to recognize that there are alternative visions of the good life that can coexist within a social web of relations ...
    Related: american, skinheads, global history, negative aspects, diverse
  • Americas Growing Pains - 1,026 words
    America's Growing Pains Americas first two presidents, George Washington and John Adams, both resolutely adhered to the idea that America should endeavor to stay out of war at all times, and did everything in their power to evade declaring and entering into war. Throughout their reigns, war was ubiquitous in Europe, and many countries (especially Britain and France) made numerous attempts to obtain and secure Americas support. Washington and Adams both believed that America should not side with any foreign country during times of war making the fundamental purport of Americas first foreign policy the elusion of war at all costs. This policy was manifested throughout Washington and Adams invo ...
    Related: americas, north america, negative aspects, american people, seas
  • Anarchism And Liberalism - 1,399 words
    ... st groups to represent the labor force, minority groups, and any apathetic and helpless citizens. The presence of sub-government groups, such as big industry, are recognized as being insufficient in representing the public's interest and so the liberals call for more regulations to control these sub-governments from abusing their power. This goes right along with the whole philosophy of contemporary liberals in that they don't want to start over and rebuild the government, but rather reform it and ad more regulations to control it. The idea of a ruler goes against the basic stance of anarchism. Proudhon best describes this view when he said, "Whoever puts his hand on me to govern me is u ...
    Related: anarchism, contemporary liberalism, liberalism, free society, individual rights
  • Angus Mclaren - 763 words
    Angus Mclaren Angus McLaren, author of "Illegal Operations: Women, Doctors, and Abortion" demonstrates the life of an abortionist in the late 1800's to the mid 1900's. McLaren explains a series of affairs in detail with many different abortionists. Since abortion was illegal at the time, many women consulted midwives, or took the procedure of abortion among themselves, this at times resulted in their death. The articles purpose is to use legal sources to explore the decision to abort while the state, and the professions took a serious interest in the fertility control decisions of women. What is being argued is the fate of women burdened with unwanted pregnancies whose well-being was placed ...
    Related: detailed description, dying patient, went wrong, properly, performing
  • Apace Research - 328 words
    Apace Research The urge to explore and search the unknown is part of human nature and has led to many of the most important changes in our standard of living. Searching and exploring enriches our spirits and reminds us of the great potential of achievement. The drive to develop the next frontier has also been a fundamental part of the heritage of the people of the world. Every year, billions of dollars are spent on the exploration of space. Many citizens doubt the necessity to research our solar system and the rest of our universe. Spaceflight may seem us as an ultramodern idea, but evidence of the dream of space exploration exists as far back as texts from early centruies from the first mil ...
    Related: international space station, neil armstrong, isaac newton, construction, declare
  • Approaches To Environmental Ethics And Kants Principle - 1,026 words
    ... sent state of world hunger. First, the Commission claims there is a "moral obligation to overcome hunger, based on two universal values - respect for human dignity and social justice." (396) In the hierarchy of human needs, food is one of the most basic of all, along with air, water and shelter. If these fundamental requirements for life are not met, then higher level needs seem almost to be luxuries and unimportant. Unless all governments of the world actively strive to see that hunger is a tragedy of the past, "the principle that human life is sacred, which forms the very basis of human society, will gradually but relentlessly erode." (397) The Commission believes the US would be the s ...
    Related: approaches, environmental, environmental ethics, ethics, moral obligation
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