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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: curious

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  • In Lewis Carrolls Novel Alice In Wonderland, Alice Is Curious, - 549 words
    In Lewis Carroll's novel Alice in Wonderland, Alice is curious, well-mannered, and confused while she tries to find her way out of Wonderland. Alice meets many unique and weird creatures which eventually help her escape wonderland. Alice shows that she is curious through her actions. At the beginning of the book Alice gets distracted from her boring work, and chases a white rabbit down a hole. This excerpt describes Alices curiosity, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed in her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket. When Alice is at the bottom of the hole she find a bottle labeled Drink Me, she wants to see what it tastes like, this excerpt describes ...
    Related: alice, alice in wonderland, lewis, lewis carroll, make sense
  • 12 Angry Men - 861 words
    12 Angry Men Twelve Angry Men Leaders are defined by two separate characteristics; those who are appointed as the leader and those with no special title that emerge as influential. In the movie Twelve Angry Men, Henry Fonda portrays a character that gains respect by others for emerging as a leader. Along with holding leadership abilities, his actions also resulted in classic communication techniques. At the beginning of the movie, it may seem that Fonda is displaying deviant behavior. The scene opens with the jurors casting guilty votes to determine a thoughtless verdict. All eleven jurors, except one (Fonda) voted guilty. As a viewer watching this movie, you have to give the character consi ...
    Related: angry, twelve angry, leadership style, deviant behavior, tension
  • 16th Century Poetry - 1,273 words
    16Th Century Poetry Part I: 1. Name three of the Germanic tribes that brought to England the dialects that make up the basis of the language we now call Old English. The Germanic tribes that brought the dialects were the Angles, the Saxons, and the Jutes. 2. Give an example from Beowulf of three of the following poetic devices: alliteration, the kenning, variation (repetition of appositives), or the litote (understatement). There are several examples of alliteration in lines 3079-3084, "Nothing we advised could ever convince the prince we loved, our land's guardian, not to vex the custodian of the gold, let him lie where he was long accustomed, lurk there under earth until the end of the wor ...
    Related: century poetry, poetry, wife of bath, queen guinevere, repetition
  • The Psychological And Physical Aspects Of Drug Abuse In Today's Adolescence - 1,423 words
    "The Psychological And Physical Aspects Of Drug Abuse In Today'S Adolescence" "The psychological and physical aspects of drug abuse in today's adolescence" Unfortunately the abuse of illegal drugs is not uncommon in today's adolescent communities. Many teenagers today use illicit drugs as a way to deal with everyday pressures such as school, after school jobs, sports activities, domestic violence and peer pressure. Adolescence has been found to be a period of weakening bonds with parents and strengthening bonds with peers (Flay, 1994). Numerous states have experienced an increase in drug related deaths (http://www.usdoj.gov/dea/stats). More than 1 in 10 of today's youth aged 12-17 were curre ...
    Related: abuse, adolescence, drug abuse, drug addiction, drug problem, gateway drug, psychological
  • A Crime In The Neigborhood - 1,324 words
    A Crime In The Neigborhood A Crime In The Neigborhood It was the summer of 1972 when Spring Hill, a Washington, D.C., suburb, got its first taste of an increasingly violent, insecure modern world. The quiet residential area, whose inhabitants traditionally left their doors unlocked and spent the summers attending one another's cookout, was rocked by the news that 12-year-old Boyd Ellison had been raped and murdered, his body dumped behind the local mall. While shaken residents organized a neighborhood watch program and clued detectives in on anyone's suspicious behavior, the inhabitants of at least one house were distracted by a tragedy of their own: 10-year-old Marsha Eberhardt's father, La ...
    Related: crime, young child, neighborhood watch, modern world, yard
  • A Cry In The Night - 1,343 words
    A Cry in the Night Setting: The story starts in New York City, most likely present day. Then as the story goes on it moves to minnesota out to Erich's farm. It is winter in Minnesota and very cold. Characters: Jenny is the main character of the story. She is a divorced mother of two. She is young and pretty. She works at an art museum in New York City to support herself and her two little girls. She is kind and sweet and has a brilliant sense of humor. Erich is an artist. He's mysterious and curious. His actions speak louder then most words because he tends to be quiet during the story. On the outside he seems like the most perfect man. The type that every woman hopes of meeting and falling ...
    Related: best friend, york city, main character, mark, coffee
  • A Modern Interpretation Of Everyman The Excerpt - 1,874 words
    A Modern Interpretation of Everyman (the excerpt) Here beginneth a treatise about how God sent the IRS to summon a common taxpayer to come and list everything that the taxpayer may count as tax deductible. This basically sums up any good deeds the taxpayer (as a whole everyone) has committed, such as charity- Rewrite[Enter Sports Commentator]Sports Commentator. Hello out there from TV land, I'm here to give you a clue. By means of this exciting account, I promise you'll enjoy it, too. Basically it's a story, or a forecast or presentation, but anyway, it depicts the state, of our great conglomeration. Of humans, and human affairs, and things we do every day. And the reigning state of human af ...
    Related: everyman, excerpt, interpretation, good thing, richard nixon
  • A More Perfect Union: - 1,022 words
    ... e power to regulate trade, the southern states would be nothing more than overseers for the Northern States. On August 21 the debate over the issue of commerce became very closely linked to another explosive issue--slavery. When Martin of Maryland proposed a tax on slave importation, the convention was thrust into a strident discussion of the institution of slavery and its moral and economic relationship to the new government. Rutledge of South Carolina, asserting that slavery had nothing at all to do with morality, declared, Interest alone is the governing principle with nations. Sherman of Connecticut was for dropping the tender issue altogether before it jeopardized the convention. Ma ...
    Related: more perfect union, articles of confederation, bill of rights, northern states, mason
  • A Picture Of Dorian Gray Basils Changes As Related To Wildes Opinion On Art - 888 words
    A Picture of Dorian Gray Basil's Changes As Related To Wilde's Opinion On Art A Picture of Dorian Gray Basil's Changes As Related To Wilde's Opinion On Art Oscar Wilde, author of The Picture of Dorian Gray, makes Basil's life change drastically by having him paint a portrait of Dorian Gray and express too much of himself in it, which, in Wilde's mind, is a troublesome obstacle to circumvent. Wilde believes that the artist should not portray any of himself in his work, so when Basil does this, it is he who creates his own downfall, not Dorian. Wilde introduces Basil to Dorian when Basil begins to notice Dorian staring at him at a party. Basil "suddenly became conscious that someone was lookin ...
    Related: dorian, dorian gray, gray, oscar wilde, picture of dorian gray, the picture of dorian gray
  • A Picture Of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde - 868 words
    A Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde Oscar Wilde, author of The Picture of Dorian Gray, makes Basil's life change drastically by having him paint a portrait of Dorian Gray and express too much of himself in it, which, in Wilde's mind, is a troublesome obstacle to circumvent. Wilde believes that the artist should not portray any of himself in his work, so when Basil does this, it is he who creates his own downfall, not Dorian. Wilde introduces Basil to Dorian when Basil begins to notice Dorian staring at him at a party. Basil "suddenly became conscious that someone was looking at [him]. [He] turned halfway around and saw Dorian Gray for the first time" (Wilde 24). Basil immediately notices ...
    Related: dorian, dorian gray, gray, oscar, oscar wilde, picture of dorian gray, the picture of dorian gray
  • Abnormal Psychology - 1,197 words
    Abnormal Psychology In a world full of fears, perhaps the worst one a human being should haveis that to be afraid of his fellow man. The human that should be mostfeared is the one that has Anti-Social Personality Disorder or in laymensterms the psychopath. The psychopath is probably the most deviant mindthat exists and treatment is not very successful because there is not a cureor drug to control it. The solution in my mind to control the problem ofsociopaths is to let them live in colonies with each other. Through myresearch I will develop an understanding of this personality disorder andconvince you the reader that my solution might be a viable solution. Thesociopath is a combination of ot ...
    Related: abnormal, abnormal psychology, psychology, hyperactivity disorder, violent behavior
  • Abortion - 1,190 words
    Abortion Almost half of American women have terminated at least one pregnancy, and millions more Americans of both sexes have helped them, as partners, parents, health-care workers, counselors, friends. Collectively, it would seem, Americans have quite a bit of knowledge and experience of abortion. Yet the debate over legal abortion is curiously abstract: we might be discussing brain transplants. Farfetched analogies abound: abortion is like the Holocaust, or slavery; denial of abortion is like forcing a person to spend nine months intravenously hooked up to a medically endangered stranger who happens to be a famous violinist. It sometimes seems that the further abortion is removed from the ...
    Related: abortion, abortion debate, legalizing abortion, nineteenth century, control laws
  • Adopted Children Should Know Their Biological Parents - 563 words
    Adopted Children should Know their Biological Parents Giving birth is like pulling your lower lip over your head -Carol Lucawikz When a mother gives birth to her child it is the ultimate bonding experience. And when a mother gives her child up for adoption, it is a selfless act for the childs best interests, but not a painless one. Every parent that is involved in an adoption arrangement will wonder and worry about their child for many days of many years. Curiosity is powerful, and it is not uncommon to long to be reunited with ones own flesh and blood. Adopted children have a right to know who their biological parents are. Health reasons, curiosity, and the need to bond with family are all ...
    Related: adopted children, biological, genetic disease, family background, parent
  • Adventures Of Huck Finn - 997 words
    Adventures Of Huck Finn Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn All children have a special place, whether chosen by a conscious decision or not, this is a place where one can go to sort out their thoughts. Nature can often provide comfort by providing a nurturing surrounding where a child is forced to look within and choices can be made untainted by society. Mark Twain once said, Don't let school get in the way of your education. Twain states that this education, which is provided by society, can actually hinder human growth and maturity. Although a formal education shouldn't be completely shunned, perhaps true life experience, in society and nature, are a key part of development. In the novel Adven ...
    Related: adventures of huckleberry finn, finn, huck, huck finn, huckleberry finn, the adventures of huckleberry finn
  • Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn - 990 words
    Adventures of Huckleberry Finn All children have a special place, whether chosen by a conscious decision or not this is a place where one can go to sort their thoughts. Nature can often provide comfort by providing a nurturing surrounding where a child is forced to look within and choices can be made untainted by society. Mark Twain once said "Don't let school get in the way of your education." Twain states that this education which is provided by society, can actually hinder human growth and maturity. Although a formal education shouldn't be completely shunned, perhaps true life experience, in society and nature, are a key part of development. In the novel Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Ma ...
    Related: adventures of huckleberry finn, finn, huck finn, huckleberry, huckleberry finn, the adventures of huckleberry finn
  • African Widow Bird - 1,437 words
    African Widow Bird Finding good day care can certainly pose a problem these days, unless, of course, you're an African widow bird. When it comes time for a female widow bird to lay her eggs, she simply locates the nest of a nearby Estrildid finch and surreptitiously drops the eggs inside. That's the last the widow bird ever sees of her offspring. But not to worry, because the Estrildid finch will take devoted care of the abandoned birds as if they were her own. And who's to tell the difference? Though adult widow birds and Estrildid finches don't look at all alike, their eggs do. Not only that, baby widow birds are dead ringers for Estrildid finch chicks, both having the same colouration and ...
    Related: african, bird, widow, sri lanka, sea anemones
  • Aids - 1,527 words
    ... AIDS from handshakes, hugs, coughs, sneezes, sweat, tears, mosquitoes, or other insects, pets, eating food prepared by someone else, or just being around an infected person. A person can't get it from sharing a cigarette, cigar, or pipe, drinking from the same fountain, or from someone spitting on him or her. A person also can't get it from using the same swimming pools, toilet seats, phones, computers, straws, spoons, or cups. Although the virus has been found in saliva, medical opinion states there is no evidence of contamination through wet kissing(What are HIV/AIDS 1). HIV is not spread through the air or water, unlike many other viruses(HIV/AIDS 2). No one has ever caught AIDS by go ...
    Related: aids, protease inhibitors, local government, state and local government, isolated
  • Albinism - 1,236 words
    Albinism INTRODUCTION For my research project I have chosen the genetic disease albinism. There are a few reasons why I chose albinism as my topic. First and foremost, in kindergarten I had a friend who was an albino, and although I have not seen him in over 10 years I am still curious as to what the causes of albinism are. Back then, my mother explained it to me by saying, thats just the way his skin is which is a fine way to explain it to a five year old, but now I find myself wanting to know more. Another reason I am curious about albinism actually extends from my first reason. I often wondered if there was any chance that my kids could possibly be born with it. I know now that it sounds ...
    Related: genetic disease, bibliography references, human genome, yellow, researching
  • Alcohol In College - 1,133 words
    Alcohol In College Alcohol is a huge problem on most college campus's. Twenty one may be the legal drinking age, but some how minors find a way to get a hold of alcohol. People as young as fifteen are able to get their hands on an alcoholic beverage. Alcohol is said to be the chosen drug among college students. College students have a tendency to drink more then the general population. It is said that college students spend approximately $4.2 billion annually an alcohol. This money is spent on 430 gallons of alcoholic beverages, and 4 million cans of beer. The type of college, geographical location, the ethnic and gender makeup plays a role in the amount of drinking that occurs on campus. Fo ...
    Related: alcohol, alcohol abuse, alcohol consumption, alcohol problems, attending college, college campus, college students
  • Alexander Popes The Rape Of The Lock - 1,658 words
    Alexander Pope's The Rape Of The Lock The Rape of the Lock: Serious Stuff Alexander Pope's mock heroic epic The Rape of the Lock appears to be a light subject addressed with a satiric tone and structure. Pope often regards the unwanted cutting of a woman's hair as a trivial thing, but the fashionable world takes it seriously. Upon closer examination Pope has, perhaps unwittingly, broached issues worthy of earnest consideration. The Rape of the Lock at first glance is a commentary on human vanity and the ritual of courtship. The poem also discusses the relationship between men and women, which is the more substantial matter in particular. Pope examines the oppressed position of women. Infring ...
    Related: alexander, lock, pope alexander, popes, rape
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