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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: cultural identity

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  • Cultural Identity - 508 words
    Cultural Identity 'Cultural identity', according to Stuart Hall can be viewed through two different ways. The first position views 'cultural identity' in terms of one shared culture, reflecting typical historical experiences and shared cultural codes. Further, these cultural codes and common historical experiences 'provide us, as 'one people', with stable, unchanging and continuous frames of reference and meaning'(Hall, p.393). The second view relies heavily on the individual's experience of their culture. Through this view, culture is always changing, it is not static as claimed by the first definition. 'Far from being eternally fixed in some essentialised past, they are subject to the cont ...
    Related: cultural identity, cultural norms, national culture, black experience, synthesis
  • In William Shakespeares Play Hamlet, The Concept Of Cultural Identity Is Explored Through Hamlets Isolation Which Is Created - 1,875 words
    In William Shakespeare's play Hamlet, the concept of cultural identity is explored through Hamlet's isolation which is created by the conflict between his duty to his father, and his duties to the monarchy and society. Hamlet is isolated from his society due to his turbulent emotions which result from his indecision on how to respond to his father's murder. Hamlet's duty as a son is to avenge his father's death and he would be supported in his actions by society if the murderer was believed to be guilty. Hamlet's duty as a citizen and a Prince is to protect the King and to ensure stability in the monarchy. In order for Hamlet to revenge his father he would have to kill the King which creates ...
    Related: cultural identity, isolation, king hamlet, prince hamlet, william shakespeare
  • Difficulties Based On Cultural Differences Marketers And Advertising Agents Have To Deal With - 1,775 words
    1. Topic The report is about the difficulties based on cultural differences marketers and advertising agents have to deal with when setting up an advertising campaign. 2. Introduction The research report will try to show what are the main problems marketers are confronted with when they set up an advertising campaign for the world markets. It is not the goal of the essay to find new approaches to avoid expensive mistakes connected with the wrong advertising campaign. It rather should show with examples where global companies have made mistakes in the past, what the consequences were and should show what companies do and did to avoid such embarrassing mistakes and maybe where the changes in a ...
    Related: advertising, advertising campaign, cross cultural, cultural identity, marketers, marketing & advertising
  • Arab Music - 1,006 words
    Arab Music Arab Music The word music comes from the Greek word Mousiki which means the science of composing melodies. Ilm al-musiqa was the name given by the Arabs to the Greek theory of music as to distinguish it from ilm al-ghinaa, the Arabian theory. The Arab music tradition developed in the courts of dynasties in the Islamic Empire from the seventh to the thirteenth century. It flourished during the Umayyad dynasty in the seventh and eighth centuries in Syria. Although the major writings of Arab music appeared after the spread of the Islamic religion in the beginning of the seventh century, the music tradition had already begun. Before the spread of Islam, Arab music incorporated music t ...
    Related: arab, music, north africa, local culture, interactive
  • Before 1865 - 922 words
    Before 1865 Brooke Massa Massa 1 American Civilization to 1865 October 18, 1999 Nationalism first emerged as the Colonists became more and more Democratic. Some argue that Democracy had always existed in the colonies, but didnt begin to emerge until around the beginning of The Enlightenment. I believe that Nationalism was present during the Revolutionary Era, but then faded again, adding fuel to the fire during the Civil War. Colonists exhibited all the aspects of Nationalism. They had a shared sense of cultural identity, a goal of political self determination, and the overwhelming majority shared a loyalty to a single national state. Colonists were thousands of miles from the king, the parl ...
    Related: french and indian war, navigation acts, stamp act, fixed, curiosity
  • Big Oil And Bus Ethics - 1,775 words
    Big Oil And Bus Ethics Big Oil in the Arctic It can be argued (convincingly) that human's usage of fossil fuels is responsible for a large part of the world's pollution problems. The area that I will discuss is the interaction that the big oil companies have had with the environment surrounding their businesses in Alaska. I will not tackle the issue of whether it is right or wrong to extract or use fossil fuels. Instead, I will ignore the larger issue and concentrate on specific issues concerning the Arctic Slope activities of oil companies in Alaska. Because the North Slope oil fields are on American soil, the regulation of the industrial activities is far more stringent than other areas in ...
    Related: ethics, specific issues, legal rights, natural environment, hunt
  • Birth Of Communication - 2,382 words
    Birth Of Communication Outline I. It is important to reflect one's own national and cultural identity to understand what is different among people of different nations. History teaches us that culture always changes because of internal or external influences, even our own cultures and values change over time. Our world today is a world in which people from different nations and cultures are getting closer and closer because of economical and political reasons. Because cultures are becoming closer, communication is the most important quality for anyone to work on if they want to work in the international society. The history of communication and the relationships that were formed in the early ...
    Related: communication technology, cross-cultural communication, cultural communication, intercultural communication, international communication
  • Birth Of Communication - 2,409 words
    ... the world was looking at America wondering what it would do next. As communication helped the word spread about this "land of opportunity" more and more people wanted to immigrate, or at least come to America to see what all the talk was about. Many Chinese and Japanese came to the United States and saw it first hand from the 1860's on (Iriye, 39). For the Chinese the personal meeting did not make as grand of an impression as it did for the Japanese. For example, the Japanese were almost desperately interested in learning more about the military strength and power that the West held. However, the Chinese government was perfectly happy with maintaining their status quo. Although it is dif ...
    Related: cultural communication, intercultural communication, international communication, cultural imperialism, greenwood press
  • Caliban Inside And Out - 1,789 words
    Caliban Inside and Out Question: Compare or contrast the ways in which roberto Fernandez Retamar and George Lamming construct national identity through the figure of Caliban. Use Shakespeare's The Tempest if you need to to discuss Caliban. In order to discuss the ways in which Retamar and Lamming have constructed a national identity through Caliban it is essential to discuss the cultural background of these writers. Retamar and Lamming are about as dissimilar as night and day, and this is evident in both the lives that they have led, as well as the essays that they have constructed. Their differences have come from their experiences, and how they have attempted to establish an identity for t ...
    Related: caliban, face value, latin american, cultural background, islands
  • Clash Of Civilizations - 2,243 words
    Clash Of Civilizations The Clash of Civilizations suggests that world politics is entering a new phase. It is his hypothesis that the fundamental source of conflict in the New World will not be primarily ideological or primarily economic. Huntington believes that the great divisions amongst humankind and the dominating source of conflict will be in the cultural form. Nation states will still remain the most powerful actors in world affairs, but the principal conflicts of global politics will occur between nations and groups of different civilizations. Huntington states: "The clash of civilizations will dominate global politics. The fault lines between civilizations will be the battle lines o ...
    Related: chinese civilization, clash, western civilization, economic systems, north america
  • Clash Of Civilizations - 2,240 words
    ... ed to the Western impact in one or more of three ways: rejecting both modernization and Westernization, embracing both, or embracing modernization and rejecting Westernization. In the twentieth century improvements in transportation and communication and global interdependence increased tremendously the costs of exclusion. Except for small, isolated, rural, communities willing to exist at a subsistence level, the total rejection of modernization as well as Westernization is hardly possible in a world becoming overwhelmingly modern and highly interconnected. Kemalism, which is the embrace of both concepts, is based on the assumptions that modernization is desirable and necessary, that the ...
    Related: clash, western civilization, latin america, progressive era, substantial
  • Communism In The World - 3,056 words
    ... ginning a nationwide offensive against the peasantry. Unknown millions died as a result. However, his industrial campains of the late 1930s enabled the Soviet Union to rise to the foremost rank of industrial powers. It was also during this time that Stalin enacted the Great Terror which killed millions. Millions more were sent to concentration camps. The fear of Stalin was carried out by his secret police called Komitet gosudarstvennoy bezopasnosti or KGB.Then an event happened that forever change the world's view of the Soviet Union. That event would be known as World War II. Stalin personnally led the assault on Germany that eventually resulted in the end of the war. The choice now was ...
    Related: after world, communism, third world, third world countries, world countries, world war ii, world wide
  • Dissecting Maggie A Girl Of The Streets - 1,105 words
    Dissecting Maggie (A Girl Of The Streets) Dissecting Maggie Maggie, A Girl of the Streets focuses on a young woman turning to the streets of New York in the late nineteenth century. Stephen Crane uses this novella to raise Americas consciousness of the desolate conditions present in urbanized cities. The Industrial Revolution had made production more bearable, but was making life increasingly unlivable for those in certain metropolises. The Industrial Revolution brought change and growth to areas such as New York City. Mechanization in Th work place led to harsher working conditions. Open factories gave way to cramped and unsafe institutions. Many of the new machines were crude versions of w ...
    Related: dissecting, maggie, maggie a girl of the streets, american city, alcohol addiction
  • Engl: Book Critique Mark Posters The Mode Of Information - 1,359 words
    ... n of traditional Japanese cultural values with American consumer culture. In fact, anywhere where capitalism and consumer culture exist, we can find evidence of what could be seen as the de-centering of identity via the messages and demands of new Media. The individual "freedom" which Poster believes a de-centering of cultural identity via new Media entails raises some doubts questionable, however. Poster believes that through this de-centering force, individuals gain "freedom" from pre-conceived notions of their potential identity and place in the world. Thus the "de-centering" of their previously ordained identity ( ordained in the sense in which it is established for them by their soc ...
    Related: book critique, critique, mark, mode, american consumer
  • Expository Writing - 1,886 words
    Expository Writing The relationship between language and image provides us with the means to seek the roots of our own ideas. In the essay, When We Dead Awaken: Writing as Re-Vision, written by Adrienne Rich, she uses varying images in her poetry to describe women and the voice open the window into her self-perception and how cultural ideologies change. John Berger writes in, Ways of Seeing that the relationship between the image and the person is an individual interpretation. Hunger as Ideology, by Susan Bordo, tells how the image is used to show cultural ideologies, especially for women. In art, literature, and in the media, images that are perceived visually or through the images produced ...
    Related: expository, personal statement, cultural identity, sexual identity, media
  • Extended Essay - 2,722 words
    ... in India. For science to develop, there must be a tendency toward a full understanding of all of Nature through a few general laws that could be learned and understood by anyone. The method of learning such laws must be such that no one is excluded from studying except through his own intellectual capabilities. In China, Needham suggests that the reasons for modern science's lack of development are due to historical, economic, social and cultural factors (Needham 1969: 190-217). Needham rightly dismisses the interpretation of Europe's eventual mastery of modern scientific techniques in geographical or racial beliefs. The scientific and mathematical achievements in both India and China d ...
    Related: economic conditions, educational theory, good thing, ordinary, humanistic
  • Extraterrestrials - 1,264 words
    ... ravels in a year equal to 9 X 4605 million million kilometres. In accordance with Albert Einstein's relativity theories a speed of light traveling starship would require an infinite amount of energy. Even a ship travelling at 99.99% the speed of light, 186,000 miles per second, would require just as large an amount of energy, almost infinite. Regardless of these scientific restrictions to space travel of enormous distances some evidence suggest the occurrence of out of this world experiences that cannot be explained. Alien abductions as well as U.F.O sightings are among the most known evidence of human contact with extraterrestrials. Although most abduction stories or UFO stories are pro ...
    Related: ancient chinese, united states military, albert einstein, gray, philosophical
  • Female Genital Mutilation - 1,231 words
    Female Genital Mutilation Female genital mutilation (FGM) is referred to as the removal of part, or all, of the female genitalia. The most severe form is infibulation, otherwise known as pharaonic circumcision. It is estimated that 15% of all FGMs performed in Africa are infibulations. The procedure consists of clitoridectomy (all, or part of, the clitoris is removed), excision (removing all, or part of, the labia minora), and cutting of the labia majora to make raw surfaces, which are stitched together to form a cover over the vagina as they heal. A small hole is left to allow urine and menstrual blood to get out. The majority (85%) of genital mutilations performed in Africa involve a clito ...
    Related: female genital mutilation, genital, genital mutilation, mutilation, gender identity
  • Globalization And Music - 1,800 words
    Globalization And Music Anthony Lanza Final Paper Professor Crabtree December 11, 2001 From Dean Martin to Wyclef Jean: The Affects of Globalization on Music Wont you help me sing these songs of freedom? -Bob Marley The influence that music has throughout the world is immeasurable. Music evokes many feeling, surfaces old memories, and creates new ones all while satisfying a sense of human emotion. With the ability to help identify a culture, as well as educate countries about other cultures, music also provides for a sense of knowledge. Music can be a tool for many things: relaxation, stimulation and communication. But at the same time it can also be a tool for resistance: against parents, a ...
    Related: globalization, music, music industry, pop music, warner music, world music
  • Hindu Revival In America - 2,304 words
    ... but they also serve as cultural nodes. He says that people are more willing to contribute to the development of a temple, but the Bridgewater temple also plays a very crucial cultural role. The nexus between the religious and cultural strands was plainly evident in 1983 at a general body meeting of Atlanta's Indian American cultural Association as it examined the objectives of an Indian cultural center. The members rejected a view that the center should be secular and limited to cultural activities and agreed to name it the India Cultural and Religious Center. Similarly, the India Temple Association in South Jersey named its center as the Hindu Temple and Cultural Center. Authenticity o ...
    Related: america, hindu, revival, stained glass, methodist church
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