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  • Crusades - 1,014 words
    Crusades Crusades were military expeditions planned and carried out by western European Christians. The crusades started around 1095. The purpose of these crusades was to overtake and gain control of the Holy Land from the Muslims. The Holy Land was Jerusalem and the Christians believed that gaining control of it was their fate. The pope would gather the people together and incite them. The origin of the crusades was a result of the expanding Turks in the middle east. These Turkish forces invaded Byzantium, a Christian empire. The crusaders were a militia, sent out to recover what they thought was theirs. The first crusades were essentially started by Pope Urban II. On November 27, 1095, he ...
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  • Crusades - 1,040 words
    Crusades In the Middle Ages, Christians considered Palestine the Holy Land because it was where Jesus had lived and taught. The Arabs had conquered Palestine in the 600s. Most Arabs were Muslims, but they usually tolerated other religions. Jews and Christians who paid their taxes and observed other regulations were free to live in Palestine and practice their own religion. The Arab rulers didnt usually interfere with Christian pilgrims visiting Palestine, and European traders could generally do business there. During the 1000s the Seljuk Turks, people from central Asia who had adopted the Muslim faith, conquered Palestine and attacked Asia Minor, which was part of the Byzantine Empire. When ...
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  • Crusades - 489 words
    Crusades The Crusades were Europe's version for "holy wars" during the Middle Ages. The official First Crusade began in 1096-1099. The First Crusade conquered a strip of land along the eastern coast of the Mediteranean about 500 miles long and averaging 40 miles wide. This European foothold in the Middle East was divided into four little kingdoms; the county of edessa, the Principality of Antioch, the County of Tripoli and the kingdom of Jerusalem this kingdoms were ruled by the Muslims soon recognized and began to reconquer this territory. The Second Crusade started in 1147-1149. The Christian forces in the Holy Land grew weak. In 1144, the Turks conquered the county of Edessa. The threat t ...
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  • Crusades And The Church - 758 words
    Crusades And The Church Crusades and the Church At the time of the Crusades, the official church had become corrupt and politically motivated. It should be noted, too, that crusaders did not take vows to go on crusade. The very term crusade, in English or in any other language, is a much later invention. What we call crusades, contemporaries knew as pilgrimages or even simply journeys. Aside from a tiny elite, people were illiterate and even if they could read, there was no access to a Bible or any scriptural teaching. It was an age of superstition and magic, where visions, signs and wonders were claimed by many. The masses' only source of knowledge about God was whatever the often corrupt a ...
    Related: crusades, canon law, holy war, pope innocent iii, unlawful
  • Political Changes After The Crusades - 493 words
    Political Changes After the Crusades The series of crusades which started from the early the 1000s and lasted for about two hundred years caused many important political changes in Europe. One of the results of the Crusades was the shift of power between kings and feudal lords. The method of direct taxing was initiated by the kings for the first time. The church also assumed more political power because of its spiritual leadership role in the Crusades. Evidently, the Crusades caused major changes of politics in Europe. Power shifted in Europe from the feudal lords to kings after the Crusades. Kings imposed new taxed and raises armies to help the Crusades. In this process, they gained the res ...
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  • The Crusades - 1,122 words
    ... (6) The Muslims had time to regroup after the Second Crusade, and in 1169, Nur al-Din's forces took Egypt. Saladin took control of the Muslims when Nur al-Din died on May 15, 1174 in Damascus. In 1180 he joined forces with the Anatolian Seljuk sultan, Kilij Arslan II. Saladin stopped the unification of Aleppo and Mosul in 1182, brought Aleppo under his control in 1183, and made a four year truce with the Franks in 1185 after invading Palestine in 1183. Reynald of Chtillon, leader of the Franks, broke the truce when he heard of a rich caravan of unarmed merchants traveling on the east bank of Jordan. In retaliation, Saladin invaded Palestine in 1187. The Franks got their forces together t ...
    Related: crusades, second crusade, holy roman emperor, king richard, ransom
  • The Crusades - 1,122 words
    ... (6) The Muslims had time to regroup after the Second Crusade, and in 1169, Nur al-Din's forces took Egypt. Saladin took control of the Muslims when Nur al-Din died on May 15, 1174 in Damascus. In 1180 he joined forces with the Anatolian Seljuk sultan, Kilij Arslan II. Saladin stopped the unification of Aleppo and Mosul in 1182, brought Aleppo under his control in 1183, and made a four year truce with the Franks in 1185 after invading Palestine in 1183. Reynald of Chtillon, leader of the Franks, broke the truce when he heard of a rich caravan of unarmed merchants traveling on the east bank of Jordan. In retaliation, Saladin invaded Palestine in 1187. The Franks got their forces together t ...
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  • The Crusades - 340 words
    The Crusades In the beginning of the thirteenth century most people were Roman Catholic. The church was the center of life and it was very important to them to pilgrimage to the Holy Lands. By 1212 Christians were not allowed into the Holy Lands. The Moslems controlled those lands and would not let them in. The crusades were a series of wars, that were fought in order to attain control over the Holy Lands. Some of the crusades were successful and some of them were not successful. The first crusade was led by Pope Urban then second in 1096. It took the over two years to reach the Holy Lands. They had started with over six-hundred thousand men and by the time they reached the Holy Lands they w ...
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  • The Crusades - 714 words
    The Crusades The Crusades were just a war waged over power, fear, and interest. The purpose of the Crusades was to recapture the Christian Holy Land from the Muslims, Arabs, and even the Turks. The Crusades were stirred up and sponsored by the papacy. It is the will of G-d, claimed Pope Urban II. His statement was not the only reason as to why the majority of the Christian population decided to engage in war against the nonbelievers. Pope Urban IIs statement seems more like an excuse to make the war seem just and rightful in the name of G-d. The Crusades were expeditions undertaken in fulfillment of a solemn vow, to deliver the Holy Land from Muhammedan tyranny. By the late 11th century, the ...
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  • The Crusades - 1,122 words
    ... (6) The Muslims had time to regroup after the Second Crusade, and in 1169, Nur al-Din's forces took Egypt. Saladin took control of the Muslims when Nur al-Din died on May 15, 1174 in Damascus. In 1180 he joined forces with the Anatolian Seljuk sultan, Kilij Arslan II. Saladin stopped the unification of Aleppo and Mosul in 1182, brought Aleppo under his control in 1183, and made a four year truce with the Franks in 1185 after invading Palestine in 1183. Reynald of Chtillon, leader of the Franks, broke the truce when he heard of a rich caravan of unarmed merchants traveling on the east bank of Jordan. In retaliation, Saladin invaded Palestine in 1187. The Franks got their forces together t ...
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  • The Crusades Were Military Expeditions Launched Against The - 1,147 words
    The crusades were military expeditions launched against the Muslims by the Christians in an attempt to regain the Holy Land. They took place between 1095 A.D. and 1270 A.D. It was one of the most violent periods in the history of mankind. The starting point of the crusades was on November 18, 1095 A.D. when Pope Urban II opened the Council of Clermont. On November 27, outside the French city of Clermont-Ferrand, the Pope made an important speech . He called upon everyone to help the Christians in the east to restore peace. The crowd's response was very positive. Garments were cut into crosses which were attached to people's shoulders in an imitation of Christ (Matthew 10:38).(1) The original ...
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  • The Crusades Were Military Expeditions Launched Against The - 1,122 words
    ... he Muslims had time to regroup after the Second Crusade, and in 1169, Nur al-Din's forces took Egypt. Saladin took control of the Muslims when Nur al-Din died on May 15, 1174 in Damascus. In 1180 he joined forces with the Anatolian Seljuk sultan, Kilij Arslan II. Saladin stopped the unification of Aleppo and Mosul in 1182, brought Aleppo under his control in 1183, and made a four year truce with the Franks in 1185 after invading Palestine in 1183. Reynald of Chtillon, leader of the Franks, broke the truce when he heard of a rich caravan of unarmed merchants traveling on the east bank of Jordan. In retaliation, Saladin invaded Palestine in 1187. The Franks got their forces together to wit ...
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  • You Are Of Your Father, The Devil, States Martin Luther Anything From The Crucifixion Of Jesus To The Crusades, Show The Many - 846 words
    "You are of your father, the devil," states Martin Luther. Anything from the crucifixion of Jesus to the crusades, show the many times in history when the Jews were troubled. There are many things in Christianity, throughout time, that account for the change in Christianity from anti-Judaism to Anti-Semitism. The Gospel of Matthew states: "And forthwith he came to Jesus, and said, Hail, master; and kissed him." This is Judas, a Jew, saying this to the others. This is an indirect blame for the crucifixion of Jesus. This section means that Jews wish harm upon Jesus. This chapter lays out Jesus as being a powerful but humble son of God. Thinkest thou that I cannot now pray to my Father, and he ...
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  • A Comparison Of Judaism, Islam, Christianity - 1,589 words
    ... from their homes. Much persecution of Jews by Christians has been justified by the belief that the Jews were responsible for the death of Christ. In Nazi Germany and after the fall of the Third Reich, many Germans said that even though what happened to the Jews of Europe during World War Two was horrible, they did bring it on themselves because they were responsible for the death of Jesus. The Christian/Muslim conflicts began during the seventh century CE, with the fall of the Byzantine cities in Egypt and the Holy Land within ten years of the death of Muhammad. "Europeans watched in horror as the Holy Lands became Muslim and the "infidel" advanced into Spain" (Fisher, p.382). This Euro ...
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  • Ap European History - 495 words
    AP European History Expansion Essay December 5, 2000 Fifteenth Century Expansion and Exploration The move by European nations and empires beginning in the fifteenth centuries had many precursors leading up to it. The expansion was mostly the result of a quest for wealth however. New technology and new knowledge of the earth and ways to navigate it were a great assistant to mariners, and thus gave the success for riches a higher probability for success. Those reasons were only further enabled by the goal of spreading Christianity. Wealth has arguably been the motive behind most of man's efforts throughout time. European exploration is certainly no exception. The riches of Asian and Indian goo ...
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  • Applied Nostalgia - 2,252 words
    ... an apocalypse not. The 1950s and the 1990s are utterly and completely different. The 1950s was a post-war time, where utterly irreproducible affects kept mom at home. The 1990s is a technology laden information society, where media pries into corners and brings problems into greater light including violence, rape, birth control, and AIDS. The amount of nuclear families decreased (Two 1), yet the cause for the dissolve of the family outweighs the difficulties, the equalization of women in the work force. No longer do mothers rely on the male's income, they can survive on their own. Their ties of help flutter free and the American women becomes free since the American ideals put forth in ...
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  • Billy Graham - 2,239 words
    ... des of the fifties, if it were in print, it was infallible truth. As a result, not only was communism a force from overseas to fear, it was a force within our own boundaries threatening to tear apart the post war threads that tenuously held the nation together. Billy Graham was not immune to what was going on. When he spoke about communism, he spoke as a person not completely removed from the attitudes that were prevalent in the nation. He, too feared communism. In a message delivered as early as 1947 he stated, Communism is creeping inexorably into these destitute lands, into wartorn China, into restless South America, and unless the Christian religion rescues the nation from the clutch ...
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  • Byzantine Empire - 1,969 words
    Byzantine Empire The greatest of medieval civilizations was the Eastern Roman Empire. The Roman Empire was divided in 395. The Western half, ruled from Rome, was ruled by the barbarians in the 5th century. The Eastern half, known as the Byzantine Empire, lasted for more than over 1,000 years. The Byzantine Empire was one of the leading civilizations in the world. In 324, Constantine, the first Christian emperor, became the single ruler of the Roman Empire. He set up his Eastern headquarters at the ancient Greek colony of Byzantium in 330. This city, later renamed Constantinople, was also known as new Rome. It became the capital of the Byzantines after the Roman Empire was divided. Constantin ...
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  • Cavalry - 1,233 words
    Cavalry Medieval Calvary Throughout time horses have played an important role in society. Since their first introduction, they have continued to prove that they are a valuable asset. The horse fulfilled this role durning the middle ages to almost a key, in both personal and state affiars. It was in state affairs during the middle ages that the Cavalry rose to become an important part of the battle stratagies of medieval commanders. The unit of choice went from Northren Europes intialy based infantry system into a largely dependent cavalary based system. During the cavalarys rain as quaterback of the medieval battlefield, it did not go through untouched, but took some setbacks from certian co ...
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  • Christian Antisemitism - 1,362 words
    Christian Anti-Semitism For sixteen hundred years, the Jewish people have been persecuted and murdered by people who worship a Jewish man as their savior: the Christians. Why did Christian anti-Semitism, a seemingly illogical belief given that Jesus himself was a Jew, develop? How did it evolve, and why has it persisted for centuries? In the Biblical gospels, despite three of the four being ostensibly written by Jews, enemies of Jesus are referred to as "the Jews." Early Christians found themselves in a quandary. The savior they worship, himself a Jew, purportedly was killed by Jews. Since at least the fourth century, some groups of Christians have actively practiced anti-Semitism, taking re ...
    Related: antisemitism, christian, constantine the great, middle east, kidnapped
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