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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: courtly love

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  • Courtly Love In Chaucer - 1,778 words
    Courtly Love in Chaucer Courtly Love in Chaucer In the "Franklin's Tale," Geoffrey Chaucer satirically paints a picture of a marriage steeped in the tradition of courtly love. As Dorigen and Arveragus' relationship reveals, a couple's preoccupation with fulfilling the ritualistic practices appropriate to courtly love renders the possibility of genuine love impossible. Marriage becomes a pretense to maintain courtly position because love provides the opportunity to demonstrate virtue. Like true members of the gentility, they practice the distinct linguistic and behavioral patterns which accompany the strange doctrine of courtly love. The characters' true devotion to the relationship becomes s ...
    Related: chaucer, courtly, courtly love, geoffrey chaucer, true love
  • Abelard And Heloise - 750 words
    Abelard And Heloise The twelfth century was divided into two phases: Early Middle Ages or Dark Ages and the High Middle Ages. Its during the High Middle Ages when things started to take a turn both mentally and physically. Churches developed more stamina and papal bureaucracy was created. The government was revived. Urbanization increased and most of all a sudden increase was brought in cultural revitalization and courtly love was an important aspect of this awakening. Courtly love is defined as humility, courtesy, adultery and religion of love. This is what I believe Abelardss and Heloises relationship was based on in Abelards Historia Calamitatum and his letters to Heloise. Abelard was a w ...
    Related: abelard, heloise, middle ages, early middle ages, uncle
  • Alighieri, Dante The Divine Comedy - 1,760 words
    Alighieri, Dante The Divine Comedy The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri (1265 - 1321) Type of Work: Allegorical religious poem Setting Hell, Purgatory and Paradise; A.D. 1300 Principal Characters Dante, the Pilgrim Virgil, the Poet, and Dante's guide Beatrice, Dante's womanly ideal and religious inspiration Story Overview Prologue: Dante, realizing he has strayed from the "true way,. into worldliness, tells of a vision where he travels through all the levels of Hell, up the mount of Purgatory, and finally through the realms of Paradise, where he is allowed a brief glimpse of God. The traveler sets out on the night before Good Friday, and finds himself in the middle of a dark wood. There he e ...
    Related: comedy, dante, dante alighieri, divine, divine comedy
  • Aliison From The Millers Tale Chauser - 817 words
    Aliison from the Millers Tale (Chauser) Eighteen-year-old Alison is one of the main characters in The Millers Tale. She is married by arrangement to a much older man, a carpenter named John. Alisons youth is displayed in her appearance and actions. She feels she is too young to be married to an older man and should be out having fun and enjoying her life. This causes her to be carefree and to present herself to other men in ways inappropriate coming from a married woman. Geoffrey Chauser describes her in the way of nature. The actions produced by Alison in The Millers Tale portrays her as an immature youth who is not adult enough to be involved in any relationship, let alone a marriage, alth ...
    Related: tale, courtly love, girdle, nave
  • Black Boy - 1,298 words
    Black Boy Annonymous Behind every great painting, symphony, piece of literature, or other artwork there hides a powerful emotion that fuels the artist from start to completion. When we look at a painting, we are not just seeing colored pigment suspended in oil on a stretched canvas, we are taking a close look into the heart and soul of the creator of that painting. Every piece of art is also a piece of the artist. One need only glance at one of the many self-portraits of Van Gogh to see a glimpse into his life and his inner turmoil. Similarly, one must only read the early and late poetry of Dante to gain insight into his mind, his passions, and, ultimately, his soul, and the way in which he ...
    Related: black boy, divine comedy, love affair, natural science, striking
  • Camelot: The Archetypal Environment - 1,298 words
    Camelot: The Archetypal Environment In Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, the setting plays an integral role in the meaning of the poem. The three settings are all inseparable from the events which take place there and the manner in which Gawain is affected by the inhabitants. Camelot, Lord Bertilak's castle and the Green Chapel and their characters are considerably distinct from each other, each affecting and appealing to Gawain in a particular way. Because of its many positive qualities and familiarity, ultimately, the most attractive and appealing setting is Camelot. Lord Bertilak's castle has several positive aspects but is not the most appealing because most of these elements are deceptiv ...
    Related: round table, sir gawain and the green knight, roman empire, cleft, alternate
  • Chevalier - 685 words
    CHEVALIER The middle ages is the period between antiquity and the Renaissance, dated between 500 and 1500 A.D. Chivalry was the code of values for the true knight. During these times there were a great number of kingdoms and all of them needed protection, so many men became knights. The word chivalry comes from the French word for knight, chevalier, which comes from the Old French word for militia, chevalerie. Chivalry's best example is a christian knight. Roland from Roland and Arthur from The Once and Future King were good examples of this. An ideal man for the Medieval Cosmos is the Christian knight. War was one of the knight's strengths. At all times, knights were couragous. Roland takes ...
    Related: chevalier, middle ages, future king, medieval times, sword
  • Chivalrous Code - 770 words
    Chivalrous Code Chivalry began in the 12th century in the form of a knightly code of conduct, with special emphasis on courtly manners toward women. Thirteenth century stories that showed the ways a warrior should behave in romance became popular. Churchmen liked the idea of high standards and made the knighting ceremony a religious occasion with a church vigil and purifying bath. Books on the subject soon began to appear. Many forms of chivalrous code can be found today, from The Cowboys Code to the Rules of Courtly Love. These codes are stated with the hope that people will try and follow them to some degree; yet only the perfect could adhere to them all. Considering the fact that such per ...
    Related: medieval times, don quixote, the prince, courtly, worthy
  • Chivalry In Chaucers Canterbury Tales - 791 words
    Chivalry in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales In his Canterbury Tales, Chaucer fully explicates the cultural standard known as curteisye through satire. In the fourteenth century curteisye embodied sophistication and an education in French international culture. The legends of chilvalric knights, conversing in the language of courtly love, matured during this later medieval period. Chaucer himself matured in the King's Court, and he reveled in his cultural status, but he also retained an anecdotal humor about curteisye. One must only peruse his Tales to discern these sentiments. In the General Prologue, he meticulously describes the Prioress, satirically examining her impeccable table manners. In t ...
    Related: canterbury, canterbury tales, chivalry, the canterbury tales, courtly love
  • During The Early Middle Ages, Europe Was Undergoing Various Changes And Development In Its Recovery From The Fall Of Rome Med - 1,257 words
    During the early Middle Ages, Europe was undergoing various changes and development in its recovery from the fall of Rome. Medieval civilization developed due to the fall of Rome through the integration of Greco-Roman, Christian and Germanic elements. As medieval society grew and changed, several different communities were established. Three such communities were the feudal community, the monastic community and the intellectual community. Medieval communities exhibited a bias against women which is exemplified by women's struggles to improve their status. There were two feudal ages and the position of the woman changed slightly during these two ages. The first feudal age was the age of feuda ...
    Related: early middle ages, middle ages, recovery, rome, undergoing
  • Humor Was Used In The Medieval Time Period To Express Ones Ideas And Thoughts Geoffrey Chaucer Also Used Humor In The Canterb - 856 words
    Humor was used in the medieval time period to express one's ideas and thoughts. Geoffrey Chaucer also used humor in The Canterbury Tales in different instances. In The Nun's Priest Tale and The Miller's Tale I will show you how he uses humor to describe characters, his use of language and the actual events that take place. In the Nun's Priest Tale there is a rooster named Chaunticleer. His name suggests a fine knight or noble prince. The description of a rooster as a noble prince in courtly love romances is ridiculas and maybe this is what keeps us from taking him to seriously in this story. Nicholas, a clerk or scholar, from The Miller's Tale also has a ironic name. His name suggests St. Ni ...
    Related: chaucer, geoffrey, geoffrey chaucer, humor, medieval
  • King Arthur - 394 words
    King Arthur There has been a lot of material written about the legendary King Arthur and although he has been a popular figure inliterature for over 800 years, not a lot is known about the real Arthur. It is believed that Arthur was a 5the-century British King named Riothamus (meaning "high king") who ruled from 454 - 470 A.D. and led an army into Gaul where he was defeated by the Goths of Burgundy. Two men by the names of Jordanes (6the century) and William (11the century) contributed to the legend of Arthur. Their input was perhaps the real basis of future adaptations of the story. Arthur appeared in literature as a national hero in a book written in Latin by Geoffrey of Monmouth called Hi ...
    Related: arthur, king arthur, courtly love, thomas malory, malory
  • Knights And Knighthood - 1,299 words
    Knights And Knighthood What is a knight? What is the concept of knighthood all about? Knighthood exists in two places simultaneously--in the world and in our imagination. We can speak of ideals versus realities, probably the central problem with knighthood and the chivalric ideals. Swords, horses, jousts, armor, castles, fair maidens, kings, queensthese are the words that come to mind when people mention the word knight. The mental image of a knight embedded in everyones minds shows an armor-clad man on a horse. The noble beings beneath the armor are virtually unknown to many. Behind every knights intimidating physical appearance lay the values, morals, and history of chivalry that has made ...
    Related: knighthood, knights, the knight, western europe, ancient times
  • Marriage In Chaucers The Canterbury Tales - 1,425 words
    Marriage In Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales demonstrate many different attitudes toward and perceptions of marriage. Some of these ideas are very traditional, such as that discussed in the Franklin's Tale, and others are more liberal such as the marriages portrayed in the Miller's and the Wife of Bath's Tales. While several of these tales are rather comical, they do indeed give us a representation of the attitudes toward marriage at that time in history. D.W. Robertson, Jr. calls marriage the solution to the problem of love, the force which directs the will which is in turn the source of moral action (Andrew, 88). Marriage in Chaucer's time meant a union between ...
    Related: canterbury, canterbury tales, geoffrey chaucer, successful marriage, the canterbury tales
  • Medieval Music - 1,247 words
    Medieval Music Music of the Middle Ages made great advancements through the centuries, which many are still evident today. The Christian Church effected the development of music greatly during the middle ages. The first major type of music of this time was chanting. The early Christians inherited the Jewish chants of synagogues.(Bishop-324) Chants didnt have constant rhythm, every note was about the same length. They had only one melody ,usually in the major key of C. All the singers sang the same notes together, this is called monophonic. Chants became an significant part of the church service, they were sung throughout the mass. These first chants were just sung by the congregation, later ...
    Related: folk music, medieval, medieval music, medieval times, music
  • Millers Tale - 1,809 words
    Miller's Tale Courtly Love in Chaucer and Marie de France In his The Miller's Tale Chaucer presents a side of the courtly love tradition never seen before. His characters are average middle class workers rather than elite nobility. There is an interesting comparison between the Miller's characters and those in two of Marie de France's lais that share very close plot lines. Instead of being idealized Chaucer's characters are gritty. Instead of being involved in courtly love there is some evidence that the relationship between Alison and Nicholas is one of lust. Chaucer's use of the lower class makes the absurdity of what they are doing stand out. In the lais of Marie de France, Guigemare and ...
    Related: tale, the miller, the knight, middle class, medieval
  • Role Of Entertainers As Educators - 1,950 words
    Role Of Entertainers As Educators Both entertainment and education have been integrals parts of the human experience since the beginnings of time. Many scholars insist that the two institutions often serve jointly, with entertainers and entertainment serving as a main source of education. There is little argument, then, that in addition to generally appealing to the masses, entertainers have regularly fulfilled the role of a teacher to typically unsuspecting audiences. Entertainers have served as educators throughout history, from the origins of oral narratives through the Middle Ages. The earliest forms of unwritten communication were essentially used to spread knowledge from one source to ...
    Related: entertainers, religious belief, twenty-first century, current affairs, verse
  • Sexual And Bodily Subjects - 588 words
    Sexual And Bodily Subjects The Miller's Tale, a short story by Geoffrey Chaucer, deals frankly with sexual and bodily subjects. Chaucer is never obscene, he allows the reader to use his imagination to determine what some of the events actually mean. the tale is a fabliau, which is a short story in verse that deals satiracally and humorously about sexual or monetary deception. When Chaucer describes the characters, he creates a unique theme for each person that helps the reader determine their role in the story. For example, he describes Alisoun as being a young, playful, and attractive girl that enjoys showing off what she has. And by hir girdle heenu a purs of lether Tasseled with silk and ...
    Related: bodily, sexual, sexual assault, short story, the miller
  • Sir Gawain And The Green Knight: The Role Of Women - 1,143 words
    Sir Gawain and the Green Knight: The Role of Women Sir Gawain and the Green Knight: The Role of Women In the fourteenth century, chivalry was in decline due to drastic social and economic changes. Although feudalism-along with chivalry-would eventually fall for other reasons, including a decrease in cheap human resources due to a drop in population caused by plague epidemics and the emergence of a mercantile middle class, the Gawain author perceived a loss of religious values as the cause of its decline. Gawain and the Green Knight presents both a support of the old feudal hierarchies and an implicit criticism of changes by recalling chivalry in its idealized state in the court of King Arthu ...
    Related: gawain, green knight, sir gawain and the green knight, young child, king arthur
  • Sir Gawain And The Green Knight: The Role Of Women - 1,194 words
    ... the rules of carving and distributing the days spoils. While the hunt is going on Gawain is lying in bed, and this is mentioned in each hunting scene to emphasize the contrast. In contrast to the hunt scenes, Gawain's situation seems too pleasurable, bordering on the sin of luxury and representing a private world outside of the traditional hierarchies, rules and loyalties. The Lady is not just suggesting certain moral associations to the reader; she is a real temptress testing his chastity and a real object of courtly love, testing his courtesy. As she presses him more and more aggressively as each day passes, the conflict between his spiritual love and courtly love becomes apparent, fo ...
    Related: gawain, green chapel, green knight, sir gawain and the green knight, virgin mary
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