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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: convince

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  • Buckley Jr - 2,624 words
    ... alleviate the symptoms of glaucoma; to improve appetite dangerously reduced from AIDS. They use it as an effective medicine, yet they are technically regarded as criminals, and every year many are jailed. Although more than 75 per cent of Americans believe that marijuana should be available legally for medical purposes, the Federal Government refuses to legalize access or even to sponsor research. 2. Drugs are here to stay. The time has come to abandon the concept of a "drug-free society." We need to focus on learning to live with drugs in such a way that they do the least possible harm. So far as I can ascertain, the societies that have proved most successful in minimizing drug-related ...
    Related: buckley, war on drugs, johns hopkins, community policing, stick
  • 12 Angry Men - 801 words
    12 Angry Men Every person may have his own way of defining the term "reasonable doubt." In the play "Twelve Angry Men", by Reginald Rose, one juror, number Eight, stands alone against 11 others to convince them that the boy is not guilty. He looks beyond the given testimonies in order to give the boy a fair trial, though this is more then the others think the boy deserves. If the jury finds a "reasonable doubt", it must declare an innocent verdict. A young man stands accused of fatally stabbing his father, and his fate now lies in the hands of his "peers:" 12 men from all walks of life, each with his own agenda, fears and personal demons. At first, based on their conversation, it seems that ...
    Related: angry, twelve angry, reasonable doubt, reginald rose, cars
  • 12 Angry Men - 861 words
    12 Angry Men Twelve Angry Men Leaders are defined by two separate characteristics; those who are appointed as the leader and those with no special title that emerge as influential. In the movie Twelve Angry Men, Henry Fonda portrays a character that gains respect by others for emerging as a leader. Along with holding leadership abilities, his actions also resulted in classic communication techniques. At the beginning of the movie, it may seem that Fonda is displaying deviant behavior. The scene opens with the jurors casting guilty votes to determine a thoughtless verdict. All eleven jurors, except one (Fonda) voted guilty. As a viewer watching this movie, you have to give the character consi ...
    Related: angry, twelve angry, leadership style, deviant behavior, tension
  • 12 Angry Men - 485 words
    12 Angry Men A persons surroundings can influence him. In 12 Angry Men by Reginald Rose a young mans life is held by twelve men with contrasting views. After hearing, the case the jurors go into deliberations. Eleven of the 12 are convinced that the boy murdered his father. However, Juror # 8 a caring man, who wishes to talk about why the other jurors think that the boy is guilty, clashes with Juror # 3, a sadistic man who would pull the switch himself to end the boys life. Early on, it's not revealed why #3 feels so strongly about putting the boy to death. He is just so dead set on killing him though. But because of Juror # 8, the others must now go over the whole case again to review the f ...
    Related: angry, reasonable doubt, reginald rose, contrasting views, sadistic
  • 16th Century Poetry - 1,273 words
    16Th Century Poetry Part I: 1. Name three of the Germanic tribes that brought to England the dialects that make up the basis of the language we now call Old English. The Germanic tribes that brought the dialects were the Angles, the Saxons, and the Jutes. 2. Give an example from Beowulf of three of the following poetic devices: alliteration, the kenning, variation (repetition of appositives), or the litote (understatement). There are several examples of alliteration in lines 3079-3084, "Nothing we advised could ever convince the prince we loved, our land's guardian, not to vex the custodian of the gold, let him lie where he was long accustomed, lurk there under earth until the end of the wor ...
    Related: century poetry, poetry, wife of bath, queen guinevere, repetition
  • 16th Century Poetry - 1,305 words
    ... o the different social classes that existed, so he wrote in a more indirect approach towards life. Although he did not see the different social classes, by being a Christian and/or Priest, he was likely able to associate with people that he could relate to, such as the ones who did not believe in Christianity or simply did not know. The situations that both authors were in gave both of them an excellent perspective on the characters that they were writing about. Chaucer included characters from all classes except the nobility, which is indicative of the classes he was welcomed into by the participants. The author of Beowulf is dedicated to serving his God and it is acceptable to believe ...
    Related: century poetry, poetry, general prologue, morte darthur, indirect
  • 1776 Vs 1789 - 1,691 words
    1776 vs 1789 The American and French Revolutions both occurred in the eighteenth century; subverting the existing government and opening the way for capitalism and constitutionalism. Because of these similarities, the two revolutions are often assumed to be essentially eastern and western versions of each other. However, the two are fundamentally different in their reason, their rise, progress, termination, and in the events that followed, even to the present. The American Revolution was not primarily fought for independence. Independence was an almost accidental by-product of the Americans attempt to rebel against and remove unfair taxes levied on them by British Parliament. Through propaga ...
    Related: working class, middle class, great britain, master, propaganda
  • 1984 - 1,513 words
    1984 Nineteen Eighty-Four is a compelling novel, written in the period just after W.W.II. It details the life of one man, Winston Smith, and his struggles with an undoubtedly fascist government. The book is set approximately in the year 1984, in which Winston's society is ruled by a governing force known as The Party. At the head of this government is a fictional figure known as Big Brother, to whom all citizens must love and respect. In this society, privacy and freedom do not exist. People are constantly monitored by telescreens, and subjected to a constant barrage of propaganda. Any devious thought or action is dealt with by cruel and deadly punishment. Winston is a worker in one of the g ...
    Related: 1984, government agencies, specific purpose, big brother, history
  • 1984 Sanity And Salvation - 880 words
    1984 - Sanity and Salvation In 1984, George Orwells Partys definition of sanity and salvation is a paradox to the real definition of sanity and salvation. The author used the protagonist, Winston Smith, to portray the insane but real definition of sanity. During the interrogation process, OBrien, a member of the Inner Party and supposed Brotherhood, is trying to prove to Winston that he persuades himself that he remembers events that never happened and that he is ...unable to remember real events (203). OBrien then mentions an example about three men who were falsely accused and that Winston actually held the evidence proving them innocent in his hand was all a mere delusion. After OBrien sh ...
    Related: 1984, salvation, sanity, george orwell, inner party
  • The Psychological And Physical Aspects Of Drug Abuse In Today's Adolescence - 1,423 words
    "The Psychological And Physical Aspects Of Drug Abuse In Today'S Adolescence" "The psychological and physical aspects of drug abuse in today's adolescence" Unfortunately the abuse of illegal drugs is not uncommon in today's adolescent communities. Many teenagers today use illicit drugs as a way to deal with everyday pressures such as school, after school jobs, sports activities, domestic violence and peer pressure. Adolescence has been found to be a period of weakening bonds with parents and strengthening bonds with peers (Flay, 1994). Numerous states have experienced an increase in drug related deaths (http://www.usdoj.gov/dea/stats). More than 1 in 10 of today's youth aged 12-17 were curre ...
    Related: abuse, adolescence, drug abuse, drug addiction, drug problem, gateway drug, psychological
  • A Critique Of Philosophical Approaches To Criminal Justice Reform - 1,000 words
    A Critique Of Philosophical Approaches To Criminal Justice Reform People are arrested every day in the United States. They are put on probation or sent to jail, and sometimes they are let out on parole; there are millions of people affected. In 1995 alone there were over five million people under some form of correctional supervision, and the number is steadily increasing. The incarceration rate is skyrocketing: the number of prison inmates per 100,000 people has risen from 139 in 1980 to 411 in 1995. This is an immense financial burden on the country. Federal expenditure for correctional institutions alone increased 248% from 1982 to 1992. Obviously something has to be changed in the justic ...
    Related: approaches, criminal, criminal activity, criminal acts, criminal behavior, criminal justice, criminal mind
  • A Farewell To Arms A Love Story - 1,085 words
    A Farewell to Arms - A Love Story A Farewell to Arms, by Ernest Hemingway, is a typical love story. A Romeo and his Juliet placed against the odds. In this novel, Romeo is Frederick Henry and Juliet is Catherine Barkley. Their love affair must survive the obstacles of World War I. The background of war-torn Italy adds to the tragedy of the love story. The war affects the emotions and values of each character. The love between Catherine and Frederick must outlast long separations, life-threatening war-time situations, and the uncertainty of each other's whereabouts or condition. This novel is a beautiful love story of two people who need each other in a period of upheaval. Frederick Henry is ...
    Related: a farewell to arms, farewell, farewell to arms, love affair, love story
  • A Farewell To Arms By Ernest Hemingway 1899 1961 - 1,322 words
    A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway (1899 - 1961) A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway (1899 - 1961) Type of Work: Psychological realism Setting Italy and Switzerland; World War I Principal Characters Fyederic Henry, an American in the Italian army Catiteritte Barkley, a British nurse Rinaldi, an Italian surgeon and Frederic's friend Miss Ferguson, a British nurse and Catherine's friend Story Overveiw Lieutenant Frederic Henry, a handsome young American, had returned from leave in southern Italy to the front, where he served in the Italian ambulance corps. The war was still leaning toward victory for the Italians. During dinner, Lieutenant Rinaldi, Frederic's jovial surgeon friend needl ...
    Related: a farewell to arms, ernest, ernest hemingway, farewell, farewell to arms, hemingway
  • A Good Man Is Hard To Find By Flannery Oconnor - 1,311 words
    "A Good Man Is Hard To Find" by Flannery O'Connor "A Good Man Is Hard To Find," by Flannery O'Connor, presents many topics that can be discussed and debated. Christianity is one of the main topics that influence this paper and its meaning. The exploration for the meaning of the Christian faith is continuous throughout O'Connor's paper. Christianity is filled with sin and punishment, good and evil, belief and unbelief, but grandmother fully tells her opinion as she tries to convince "The Misfit" that he is a good Christian man before he kills her. Foreshadowing, personification, and the meaning of religion are all main points effecting the reader as they interpret this story. Foreshadowing is ...
    Related: flannery, flannery o'connor, good and evil, good man is hard to find, oconnor
  • A Man For All Seasons - 802 words
    A Man For All Seasons In the play A Man For All Seasons by Robert Bolt the audience learns about the extraordinary life of Sir Thomas More. Sir Thomas is faced with a moral dilemma that will determine the outcome of his life. More, chancellor of England , and a strong Christian believer is forced to choose between his close friend, King Henry VIII, and the supreme lord his God. More is a man of moral integrity because he refuses to submit to external pressures to sign the oath condoning the Act of Supremacy. He follows his heart and soul in doing what he believes to be right no matter what the consequence. More is told by King Henry VIII to sign the Act of Supremacy. The Act gives Henry VIII ...
    Related: seasons, thomas more, the duke, sir thomas more, catholic
  • A Modest Proposal By Swift - 1,196 words
    A Modest Proposal By Swift A Modest Proposal was a satirical essay written by Jonathan Swift depicting the horrific conditions of Ireland and the lives of the Irish people in 1729. The author portrays and attacks the cruel and unjust oppression of Ireland by its oppressor, the mighty English and ridicules the Irish people at the same time. However, Swift's opposition is indirectly presented. Jonathan Swift is able to do so by using the persona, irony, and wit in order to expose the remarkable corruption and degradation of the Irish people, and at the same time present them with practicable solutions to their unscrupulous and pathetic lives. The author uses a satire to accomplish his objectiv ...
    Related: jonathan swift, modest, modest proposal, proposal, swift
  • A Separate Peace: Chapter 1 - 5,644 words
    ^^^^^^^^^^A SEPARATE PEACE: CHAPTER 1 Have you ever in your life gone through an experience so intense, so joyful, so painful, or just so important at the time, that you could only understand much later what truly happened? Isn't it a fact that when we're in the middle of an experience, we are often unable to think clearly about it because we're too busy feeling the moment's thrill or sadness to stop and come to sensible conclusions? Our high school years are just such a time: of quick growth and self-discovery, of forging as well as breaking friendships, of proving ourselves to others, in the classroom and on the sports field, and a time when we want very much to be individuals and to stick ...
    Related: separate peace, competitive edge, power over, john knowles, legs
  • A Steercar Named Desire Blanches Psychological Breakdown - 1,469 words
    A Steercar Named Desire - Blanche's Psychological Breakdown In Tennesse Williams' play, "A Streetcar Named Desire" the readers are introduced to a character named Blanche DuBois. In the plot, Blanche is Stella's younger sister who has come to visit Stella and her husband Stanley in New Orleans. After their first meeting Stanley develops a strong dislike for Blanche and everything associated with her. Among the things Stanley dislikes about Blanche are her "spoiled-girl" manners and her indirect and quizzical way of conversing. Stanley also believes that Blanche has conned him and his wife out of the family mansion. In his opinion, she is a good-for-nothing "leech" that has attached itself to ...
    Related: blanche dubois, breakdown, named desire, psychological, streetcar named, streetcar named desire
  • A Textual Analysis - 1,314 words
    A Textual Analysis of Nothing Else Matters by Metallica: An Open Mind and True Heart "Metallica plays heavy metal music." This is a common stereotype of the band. "Their songs consist of nothing but meaningless screaming, while banging their guitars as loud as possible. Hordes of incomprehensible fans jump around in circles flailing their arms in the air screaming the so-called lyrics to their songs. It is not music." Numerous people believe this in all sincerity. The song "Nothing Else Matters," by no means falls under the heavy metal category. It is the type of song that would be played for a slow dance. Through the use of ethos and pathos, the author, James Hetfield, connects with his aud ...
    Related: textual, textual analysis, people believe, music industry, expressing
  • A Traveler Is Resolute And Independent - 1,973 words
    A Traveler is Resolute and Independent Tenets of Wordsworth in Resolution and Independence Romanticism officially began in 1798, when William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge anonymously published Lyrical Ballads. This work marked the official beginning of a literary period which had already begun many years before 1798. A work is defined to be of a certain period by its characteristics, therefore to be considered a Romantic work, the work must contain aspects which are termed "Romantic." A few typical "Romantic" aspects are: love of the past; sympathy to the childs mind; faith in the inner goodness of man; aspects of nature having religious, mystic, and symbolic significance; and reco ...
    Related: traveler, william wordsworth, role model, lyrical ballads, sleepless
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