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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: aboriginal people

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  • The Aboriginal People Of Newfoundland Bibliography Grabowski, Jan Lecture His 2401, October 4, 1996 Email Address: Howley, Ja - 1,092 words
    The Aboriginal People of Newfoundland Bibliography Grabowski, Jan. Lecture His 2401, October 4, 1996. Email address: Howley, James Patrick. The Beothuks or Red Indians: The Aboriginal Inhabitants of Newfoundland. University of Cambridge Press., Cambridge, England. Marshall, Ingeborg. History and the Ethnography of the BeothukMcGill)Queens University Press.: 1996, Canada. Marshall, Ingeborg C.L.. Reports and Letters by George Christopher Pulling: Relating to the Beothuk Indians of Newfoundland Breakwater Books.: 1989, St.John's, Newfoundland. Marshall, Ingeborg. The red Ochre People: How Newfoundland'sBeothuk Indians Lived. J.J. Douglas Ltd.: 1977, Vancouver. Rowe, Frederick W.. EXTINCTION: T ...
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  • Aborigines And Their Place In Politics - 1,065 words
    Aborigines And Their Place In Politics For much of their history, Australias major parties did not perceive a need to have Aboriginal affairs policies, but this altered in the 1960s and 1970s as the Aboriginal interest came to occupy a more prominent position. The policies of recent major governments, those being the Australian Labor Party (ALP) and the Coalition, consisting of the Liberal Party and National Party, have changed drastically since the Federation of Australia. The approaches throughout history of these major parties will be discussed briefly in order to gain an understanding of the foundation of each partys beliefs and platforms in regards to Aborigines. The main political issu ...
    Related: aborigines, self determination, international legal, aboriginal people, perceive
  • Australia - 1,551 words
    Australia AUSTRALIA Australia is an island continent located southeast of Asia and forming, with the nearby island of Tasmania, the Commonwealth of Australia, a self-governing member of the Commonwealth of Nations. The continent is bounded on the north by the Timor Sea, the Arafura Sea, and the Torres Strait; on the east by the Coral Sea and the Tasman Sea; on the south by the Bass Strait and the Indian Ocean; and on the west by the Indian Ocean. The commonwealth extends for about about 2500 miles from east to west and for about 2300 miles from north to south. Its coastline measures some 22,826 miles. The area of the commonwealth is 2,966,150 square miles, and the area of the continent alone ...
    Related: australia, south australia, federal government, food and drink, exporter
  • Australia Day - 453 words
    Australia Day Australia Day Australia Day is a day set aside to commemorate the arrival of Captain Arthur Phillip and the First Fleet at Sydney Cove on the 26 January 1788. On the day of his arrival, Captain Arthur Phillip declared the area that became the colony of New South Wales to be a British possession. This landing started the first permanent European settlement on this island continent. Australia Day, January 26, is celebrated with a public holiday and celebrations in every State. The choice of the 26 January as the day of celebration for all Australians has been queried and argued by many people. That the day might symbolize invasion, dispossession and death to many Aboriginal peopl ...
    Related: australia, south wales, aboriginal people, indigenous people, notion
  • Australian Immigration Law - 1,059 words
    Australian - Immigration Law Australia is similar to America in many ways. They are both industrialized nations, they were both settled by the British, and they both have multi-ethnic societies. However, the two countries have vastly different immigration laws. In America, we will let almost anyone move here and work. An American immigrant can be from (almost) any country, race, or religion. Australia on the other hand, has had a much stricter policy determining who can move to their country. Australia's immigration law is ethnocentric in nature because it excludes anyone who is not of Anglo-Saxon descent. The policy is in the best interest for the British settlers, rather than in the best i ...
    Related: australian, australian government, immigration, immigration laws, immigration policy
  • Comparisons Of Greek And Oceanic Mythology - 1,363 words
    Comparisons Of Greek And Oceanic Mythology Jeff Cressy Cressy1 The purpose of myths is to answer questions, to educate, and to entertain. How was man created? Why does the earth do the things it does? Cultures all throughout the ancient world tried to answer these questions in the form of myth. In Greece, Australia, and New Zealand, ancient storytellers created unique stories that entertained taught values and helped explain their worlds. Even though the people of these countries were separated by thousands of miles, there are an astonishing amount of similarities between their myths. While the inhabitants of these regions may have looked totally different from each other, their myths showed ...
    Related: greek, greek myth, greek mythology, mythology, oceanic, world mythology
  • Euthanasia In Australia - 1,294 words
    ... mmonwealth parliament considered the Rights of the Terminally Ill Act to represent a basic shift in Australia's ethos and social fabric. It had additional national significance as all Australians, indeed all people, could have used the Act. It therefore became not just a matter for the people of the Northern Territory, but a matter concerning all people of Australia. The Constitutional framework of Australia divides legislative responsibility between the States and the Commonwealth. The Territories derive their legislative capacity from the Commonwealth, whereas the States do not. States therefore, are different to Territories. Territorians are consequently subjected to a different legis ...
    Related: active euthanasia, australia, euthanasia, voluntary euthanasia, doctor patient relationship
  • Halucenigenic Plants - 1,588 words
    Halucenigenic Plants Man has used hallucinogenic plants for thousands of years, probably since he began gathering plants for food. The hallucinogens have continued to receive the attention of civilized man through the ages. Recently, we have gone through a period during which sophisticated Western society has "discovered" hallucinogens, and some sectors of the society have taken up, for some reason or another, the use of such plants. This trend may be destined to continue. It is important for us to learn a much as we can about hallucinogenic plants. A great amount of scientific literature has been published about their uses and effects, but the information is locked away in technical journal ...
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  • Humans And Fauna In Australia - 1,501 words
    Humans And Fauna In Australia In 1830 Mr. Rankin tied a rope around a projection out of a rock face in order to lower himself into Wellington Cave (Horton, 1980). The projection turned out to be the bone of a giant extinct marsupial. It was to be the first discovery of a great range of giant marsupials. Were these animals extinct?? Horton (1980), describes how Leichhart believed that on his journeys to northern Australia he would find Diprotodon still roaming over the land. We now know that he was probably only about 20,000 years to late (Flood, 1995). In general, all the animals greater than 40 kg in body weight became extinct at the end of the last Ice Age. By the mid 19th century scientis ...
    Related: australia, fauna, human evolution, northern australia, northern territory
  • Humans And Fauna In Australia - 1,503 words
    ... 1994). This drop in sea level resulted in much of the Australian continental shelf becoming dry land. This made it possible to walk between Australia and New Guinea, and between Victoria and Tasmania. Flood, (1995), describes how there was probably only a 90 km gap of open ocean between Australia and Asia when the sea level was low. It is thought that this enabled the first Australian's to 'island hop' their way through Asia to the north-west of Western Australia. Regardless of the actual colonisation date, it is believed that Aboriginal people occupied most of Australia by 35,000 (at least all favourable environments) (Flood, 1995). Therefore, Aboriginal people would have of the environ ...
    Related: australia, fauna, flora and fauna, galapagos islands, world wide
  • In The Following Assignment, I Will Discuss The Issue Of Native Sovereignty In Canada, And Address The Question Can Native So - 1,257 words
    In the following assignment, I will discuss the issue of native sovereignty in Canada, and address the question; "Can native sovereignty coexist with Canadian sovereignty?" To answer this question I will summarize two articles that discuss the issue. The first by John A. Olthius and Roger Townshend entitled "The Case for Native Sovereignty", and the second, by Thomas Flanagan, entitled "Native Sovereignty: Does Anyone Really want an Aboriginal Archipelago?" I will be taking the position against the coexistence of native sovereignty with Canadian sovereignty. These two articles will help me support my position on the issue. Olthius and Townshend are in favour of native sovereignty within Cana ...
    Related: native, native people, sovereignty, aboriginal people, european nations
  • Japan - 879 words
    Japan The island of Japan (145,826 sq. mi.) is located in the North Pacific Ocean. It is bounded by on the north by the Sea of Okhotsk, on the east by the Pacific Ocean, on the south by the Pacific Ocean and the East China Sea, and on the west by the Korea Strait and the Sea of Japan. I. Geography a.) Land Japan is made up of four islands: Hokkaido, Kyushu, Honshu, and Shikoku. The Entire country is smaller than the state of Montana. Honshu is the largest island of the four. It is a very mountainous island and features the Japanese Alps, which is home to Mount Fuji, Japans highest peak. These Alps also harbor many active and inactive volcanoes. The Kanto Plain, the largest lowland in the cou ...
    Related: japan, east china, international relations, national museum, soccer
  • Mike Hunt - 1,457 words
    Mike Hunt The Inuit I. Intoduction The Inuit are people that inhabit small enclaves in the coastal areas of Greenland, Arctic North America, and extreme northeastern Siberia. The name Inuit means the real people. In 1977 the Inuit Circumpolar Conference officially adopted Inuit as the replacement for the term "Eskimo." There are several related linguistic groups of Arctic people. Many of these groups prefer to be called by their specific "tribal" names rather than as Inuits. In Alaska the term "Eskimo" is still commonly used. I. Physical Characteristics and Regional Groupings The Inuit vary within about 2 inches of an average height of 5 foot 4 inches, and they display metabolic, circulatory ...
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  • Power In Society - 1,098 words
    Power In Society A world of system designed to keep people in unjust and unequal positions is held in place by several interrelated expression of power over: political power, economic power, physical force, and ideological power (Bishop, 1994: 36). So, we can say power is defined as a possession of control, authority or influence over others. In terms of power of dominant groups over subordinate groups, we define power as domination of one group of people over another in major important spheres of life. Power inequities have been in existence throughout the history of humanity and the ways of manifestation evolved from extreme overt oppression to subtle, covert oppression. Three major forms ...
    Related: bargaining power, canadian society, political power, power over, media control
  • Power In Society - 1,133 words
    ... ecognizing the diversity of various tribes. To justify their actions toward Aboriginal people, British used stereotypes to label them as uncultured and uncivilized, and decided that it is their job to bring Aboriginal people to the greater states of civilization by enforcing European norms in Canadian society (Frances, 2000: 121-123). One of the policies in 1857 even allowed for the voluntary release from the Indian status for the individuals of good character, which was a direct attack on the integrity of the Aboriginal community. This attempt to destroy the identity and the firm land base of the Aboriginal community was recognized and was resisted by Aboriginal people through a non-par ...
    Related: canadian society, south asian, canadian history, higher level, discussing
  • The Arctic Circle - 1,126 words
    The Arctic Circle Ditions enclose roughly the same territory, which is somewhat larger than the region bounded by the Arctic Circle, and will be used as the basis for this article.The largest Arctic tundra areas are in Canada, Russia, Greenland (Kalatdlit-Nunat), Scandinavia, Iceland and Alaska.Climate and Land Formation Tundra climate is characterized by harsh winters, low average temperatures, little snow or rainfall, and a short summer season (Goudie 1993). The arctic tundra, in particular, is influenced by permafrost, a layer of permanently frozen subsoil in the ground. The surface soil, which tends to be rocky, thaws in summer to varying depths. The combination of frozen ground and flat ...
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  • The Marshall Decision - 661 words
    The Marshall Decision Who: Donald Marshall (a Mikmaq fisherman), Native and non-native fisherman, Supreme Court of Canada and Herb Dhaliwal (minister of Fisheries and ocean). Where: Burnt Church, Miramichi Bay Issue: Donald Marshall, a mikmaq fisherman took a case to the Supreme Court of Canada arguing that a treaty from 1760 gave him aboriginal fishing rights and he won the trail justifying three conviction he had on fishing with out a license, fishing off season and fishing with illegal nets. After the Court ruled in Marshalls favor, many native fisherman started fishing off season as well. The Minister of Fisheries and Ocean, Herb Dhaliwal, than banned fishing from the Miramichi Bay to co ...
    Related: marshall, supreme court, life cycle, natural resources, rating
  • Whos Home And Native Land - 1,478 words
    Who's Home And Native Land? Over the past decades, Aboriginal people (the original people or indigenous occupants of a particular country), have been oppressed by the Canadian society and continue to live under racism resulting in gender/ class oppression. The history of Colonialism, and Capitalism has played a significant role in the construction and impact of how Aborignal people are treated and viewed presently in the Canadian society. The struggles, injustices, prejudice, and discrimination that have plagued Aboriginal peoples for more than three centuries are still grim realities today. The failures of Canada's racist policies toward Aboriginal peoples are reflected in the high levels o ...
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