Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: constitutional

  • 623 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>
  • Constitutional And Social Development Between 1860 And 1877 That Amounted To A Revolution - 461 words
    Constitutional And Social Development Between 1860 And 1877 That Amounted To A Revolution In what ways and to what extent did constitutional and social development between 1860 and 1877 amount to a revolution? There are many ways that constitutional and social developments caused a revolution. There are a few important developments that will be mentioned. The first one is the secession of 1860, which was a constitutional development. Some other constitutional developments that caused conflict were the Emancipation Proclamation, three civil rights bills, and the reconstruction. Some social developments that caused conflict were the Freedmen's Bureau, the Black Codes, and the Ku Klux Klan. One ...
    Related: constitutional, social development, civil rights act, ku klux klan, codes
  • Constitutional Congress - 554 words
    Constitutional Congress At the Constitutional Congress of 1787, The Delegates frequently used compromise to resolve controversial issues such as, Representation in the Government, Slavery in the new country, and Also the Morality of the Slave Trade. If it wasnt for the ability of the Founders of our country to compromise, Who knows that the United States of America would have existed at all. The constitution that they wrote over two hundred years ago, still is the basis of our government today, with only few changes. The creators were smart enough to allow room for change and growth, they knew that the document would have to change for future problems, and changes. They were aware that with ...
    Related: congress, constitutional, great compromise, central government, count
  • Constitutional Convention: Day By Day Occurrences - 1,789 words
    Constitutional Convention: Day by Day Occurrences May 29, 1787 After these few short days of the convention here in Philadelphia, I realized that it would be important to keep personal records of this convention to assist in future discussion. This will also help me with remembering details of the events. Today the "Virginia Plan" was presented by that state's delegates. They proposed a series of many resolutions that seemed well thought out to me. The plan was written by James Madison but was given to us by Edmund Randolph who was a very effective speaker and clear orator. I enjoyed listening to the resolutions and the fresh new ideas I heard in the Virginia Plan. First, the Virginia Plan r ...
    Related: constitutional, constitutional convention, articles of confederation, electoral college, proceeding
  • Constitutional Father - 1,583 words
    Constitutional Father Emmanuel Joseph Sieyes, better known as Abbe Sieyes, is considered by some scholars, the leader of the early Revolution in France; however, others consider him a selfish, jealous man. No matter what one believes, there are some indisputable facts about Abbe Sieyes. Emmanuel Joseph Sieyes was born on May 3rd, 1748 in Frejus. His father was a postmaster and collector of king's dues, while his mother was connected to the lower ranks of nobility. Sieyes' parents gave him the best education they could afford, first at home under a tutor, then in the Jesuits' College at Frejus. Most graduates of the college attended military academies and Sieyes expected the same, but was for ...
    Related: constitutional, public safety, middle class, early stages, ordination
  • Constitutional Interpretation - 1,307 words
    Constitutional Interpretation Introduction In this essay I will try to explain and critique the two dominant methods of constitutional interpretation. Which are originalism and non-originalism. I will do this by taking help from "How to Read the Constitution" by Christopher Wolfe, and different source's from Internet. I will start by giving what Wolfe says originalism is, and then I will give some background to other ways to interpret the constitution, and the founders and interpretation and I will finish up with my view on originalism and non-originalism and the critics to that. Wolfe on Originalism Wolfe says that originalism is a two-fold doctrine. First, it holds that the constitution is ...
    Related: constitutional, constitutional interpretation, interpretation, free speech, judicial review
  • Constitutional Republic - 1,058 words
    Constitutional Republic Between 1787 and 1791 the Framers of the US Constitution established a system of government upon principles that had been discussed and partially implemented in many countries over the course of several centuries, but never before in such a pure and complete design, which we call a constitutional republic. Since then, the design has often been imitated, but important principles have often been ignored in those imitations, with the result that their governments fall short of being true republics or truly constitutional. The Framers of the Constitution tried very hard to design a system that would not allow any one person or group within the government to gain too much ...
    Related: constitutional, republic, bill clinton, separation of powers, revenue
  • Japan Is A Constitutional Monarchy With A Parliamentary Government The Countrys Constitution Was Made On May 3, 1947 Right Wh - 615 words
    Japan is a constitutional monarchy with a parliamentary government. The country's constitution was made on May 3, 1947 right when the U.S. took control of Japan following World War II. Under the constitution, Japan has universal adult suffrage with a secret ballot for all elective offices. Which basically means that all legal adults in the country can vote privately. Just like the U.S. their government is made up of an executive branch responsible to the legislative branch and an independent judicial branch. The national parliament, a.k.a The Diet, is made up of (somewhat like the U.S.) two houses: a House of Representatives (lower house) of 500 members and a House of Councillors (upper hous ...
    Related: central government, constitution, constitutional, japan, monarchy, parliamentary, parliamentary government
  • Ottoman Period Constitutional Movements - 879 words
    Ottoman Period Constitutional Movements Constitutional Movements During the Ottoman Period Constitutional movements during the Ottoman period commenced towards the end of the 18th century. During the period of the 1789-1808, Sultan Selim the Third envisaged the formation of an advisory assembly, called the Meclis-i Meshveret, within the context of the New System (called the Nizam-i Cedid) that he wanted to have set up, which is seen as a major step towards a constitutional government system. The Sened-i Ittifak, or Charter of Alliance, is seen as the first important document from the point of view of a constitutional order. Whilst the 1808 charter restricted the Sultan's exercise of power, i ...
    Related: constitutional, ottoman, point of view, prime minister, nationalism
  • The Sedition Act Of 1798 For The First Few Years Of Constitutional Government, Under The Leadership Of George Washington, The - 1,196 words
    The Sedition Act of 1798 For the first few years of Constitutional government, under the leadership of George Washington, there was a unity, commonly called Federalism that even James Madison (the future architect of the Republican Party) acknowledged in describing the Republican form of government-- And according to the degree of pleasure and pride we feel in being republicans, ought to be our zeal in cherishing the spirit and supporting the character of Federalists. Although legislators had serious differences of opinions, political unity was considered absolutely essential for the stability of the nation. Political parties or factions were considered evil as Complaints are everywhere hea ...
    Related: constitutional, george washington, leadership, sedition, sedition acts
  • The Sedition Act Of 1798 For The First Few Years Of Constitutional Government, Under The Leadership Of George Washington, The - 1,131 words
    ... enced even intelligent people, What can you expect from the gaping and promiscuous crowd who delight to swallow calumny..? The Federalist needed the Sedition bill to shut down the Republican presses and Bache played right into their hands with his publication of Tallyrands conciliatory letter to the American envoys before the President had even seen it. Republicans insisted that this was a journalistic scoop that would lead to peace because France was willing to negotiate with Edmund Gerry. The Federalist wanted Bache to explain how he had received a letter that the President hadnt even seen yet. They began to accuse him of being in league with France, an agent of Tallyrand and an enemy ...
    Related: constitutional, first amendment, george washington, leadership, sedition, sedition acts
  • 2000 Presidential Campaigns - 1,091 words
    2000 Presidential Campaigns The 2000 Presidential campaigns are going to be a very close according to the recent poles made by CNN with Gore in the lead with 43 percent and Bush with 42 percent. The main Presidential candidates are Vice President Al Gore representing the democrats and Governor of Texas, George W. Bush representing the Republicans. The candidates disagree on some issues including abortion, healthcare and education. However they do agree on some things but they have different methods of obtaining their goals. Abortion, for example is one issue that they have different views about, Bush is pro-life and Gore is pro-choice. Healthcare is going to be an important point because Gor ...
    Related: campaigns, presidential, presidential debate, different ways, health care
  • 5 Most Influential People In American History - 1,556 words
    5 Most Influential People In American History The United Sates has had a short yet complex history in its two hundred and twenty-four years. She has produced millions and millions of great individuals. These great minds have shaped what America is today. Others, however, have personally molded this magnificent nation with their own acts. John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, John Marshall, Henry Clay and Andrew Jackson are the most influential builders of the United States of America. John Adams was born loyal to the English Crown but evolved into the second President of the Free World. As a lawyer, Adams emerged into politics as an opponent of the Stamp Act and was a leader in the Revolutionary gro ...
    Related: american, american congress, american history, american revolution, american system, history, influential
  • A Gold Rush Leads To War - 1,304 words
    A Gold Rush Leads to War A Gold Rush Leads to War The American Civil War (1861-1865) and the Reconstruction period that followed were the bloodiest chapters of American history to date. Brother fought brother as the population was split along sectional lines. The issue of slavery divided the nation's people and the political parties that represented them in Washington. The tension which snapped the uneasy truce between north and south began building over slavery and statehood debates in California. In 1848, settlers discovered gold at Sutter's Mill, starting a mass migration. By 1849, California had enough citizens to apply for statehood. However, the debate over whether the large western st ...
    Related: gold rush, rush, senate race, democratic party, invalid
  • A Living Organization Changes With Time Some Parts Of It May Remain Identical To That Which Was First Constructed Most Parts - 1,785 words
    A living organization changes with time. Some parts of it may remain identical to that which was first constructed. Most parts will adapt to changes in the world, in society, and in mankind itself. If it does not change, it withers and dies. Organizations which fail to adapt to changes, whether they like it or not, tend to become shrunken relics of their original selves. They become mummified images of a once living creation. Such an organization is the Ku Klux Klan, better known as the KKK. The Ku Klux Klan is one of the most hateful groups that still exists today. They are not as strong as they once were, but still pose a threat. I believe that the KKK should have never been formed because ...
    Related: identical, north carolina, after world, small town, threatening
  • A More Perfect Union: - 1,031 words
    A More Perfect Union: The Articles of Confederation The determined Madison had for several years insatiably studied history and political theory searching for a solution to the political and economic dilemmas he saw plaguing America. The Virginian's labors convinced him of the futility and weakness of confederacies of independent states. America's own government under the Articles of Confederation, Madison was convinced, had to be replaced. In force since 1781, established as a league of friendship and a constitution for the 13 sovereign and independent states after the Revolution, the articles seemed to Madison woefully inadequate. With the states retaining considerable power, the central g ...
    Related: more perfect union, circuit court, political machine, political theory, convention
  • A Peoples History Of The United States Chapter Four Summary - 831 words
    A People's History Of The United States Chapter Four Summary As the British and Colonists were engaged in the Seven Years War against the French and Indians, the colonists were slowly building up feelings for their removal from under the British crown. There had been several uprisings to overthrow the colonial governments. When the war ended and the British were victorious, they declared the Proclamation of 1763 which stated that the land west of the Appalachians was to be reserved for the Native American population. The colonists were confused and outraged and the now ambitious social elite's were raring to direct that anger against the English since the French were no longer a threat. Howe ...
    Related: american history, history, peoples history, summary, native american
  • A Report On American Economics - 916 words
    A report on American economics Most of the problems of the United states are related to the economy. One of the major issues facing the country today is social security. The United States was one of the last major industrialized nations to establish a social security system. In 1911, Wisconsin passed the first state workers compensation law to be held constitutional. At that time, most Americans believed the government should not have to care for the aged, disabled or needy. But such attitudes changed during the Great Depression in the 1930's. In 1935, Congress passed the Social Security Act. This law became the basis of the U.S. social insurance system. It provided cash benefits to only ret ...
    Related: american, economic conditions, economics, federal government, united states government
  • Abe Lincoln - 1,072 words
    Abe Lincoln History Essay The United Sates declared its independence from Great Britain on July 4, 1776. Great Britain did not recognize its independence until, the Treaty of Paris, two years after the American forces defeated the Britain army at the siege of Yorktown. Since the Articles of Confederation were replaced by the U.S. Constitution in 1789, the United States has had forty-two different presidents. Among these presidents, two of the best have were George Washington, and Abraham Lincoln. This essay will prove that George Washington was the greatest U.S. president of all time. There are certain attributes that good presidents have. It is said that good presidents are always stubborn ...
    Related: abe lincoln, abraham lincoln, lincoln, george washington, french revolution
  • Aborigines And Their Place In Politics - 1,065 words
    Aborigines And Their Place In Politics For much of their history, Australias major parties did not perceive a need to have Aboriginal affairs policies, but this altered in the 1960s and 1970s as the Aboriginal interest came to occupy a more prominent position. The policies of recent major governments, those being the Australian Labor Party (ALP) and the Coalition, consisting of the Liberal Party and National Party, have changed drastically since the Federation of Australia. The approaches throughout history of these major parties will be discussed briefly in order to gain an understanding of the foundation of each partys beliefs and platforms in regards to Aborigines. The main political issu ...
    Related: aborigines, self determination, international legal, aboriginal people, perceive
  • Abortion - 603 words
    Abortion Shane Woolf Per. B1 9-15-01 "Abortion" What is a human? A human by definition is a biological being that belongs to the species Homo sapiens that is unique from every other being. Now the question that many people are asking is: "Is a baby that is unborn a human?" Many believe that it is, including me. For one, it has 46 human chromosomes. Another thing is that it is ALIVE, meaning it is growing, developing, maturing, and replacing its own dying cells. However, many people don't feel that an unborn baby is a human; they do not feel like it is alive. It is every bit alive. I am Pro-Life, and abortions are morally wrong. There are many people that are Pro-Choice, however, and they bas ...
    Related: abortion, michael jordan, supreme court, court case, communications
  • 623 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>