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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: compulsive

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  • Obsessive Compulsive Disorder - 1,466 words
    Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Obsessive Compulsive Disorder- pg. 1 Introduction and Thesis Introduction When I was young, I used to constantly hum one solitary note every few seconds or minutes throughout the day. I also used to glide the tips of my fingers right behind my ear just so I could be assured that my hair was in place. It was almost impossible to avoid. I was continually asked the question, "why do you do that," from my classmates and friends. It was sometimes embarrassing. Then one day, my "habit" disappeared. Today, my cousin R.J. coughs for no reason every minute. My friend Brian V. constantly picks his rear end, only when driving, thinking he's playing it off. I'm always told ...
    Related: compulsive, compulsive disorder, disorder, obsessive, obsessive compulsive disorder
  • Obsessive Compulsive Disorder - 1,388 words
    ... ng and waning course. That is, symptoms may get somewhat better for months or even years, only to get worse again before returning to a lower level of severity. "Only about 5 to 10 percent of OCD sufferers enjoy a spontaneous remission in which all symptoms of OCD go away for good (Wayne K. Goodman, MD, University of Florida Brain Institute, 1999). Another 5 to 10 percent experience progressive deterioration in their symptoms." Stress can make OCD worse, but trying to eliminate all stress is unlikely to quell OCD. In fact, it is better for most people with OCD to keep busy. Idleness can be the breeding ground for increased obsessional thinking. Changes in the severity of OCD may be relat ...
    Related: compulsive, compulsive disorder, disorder, obsessive, obsessive compulsive disorder
  • Obsessive Compulsive Disorder - 760 words
    Obsessive Compulsive Disorder The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual defines obsessions and compulsions as follows; Obsessions are persistent ideas, thoughts, impulses, or images that are experienced as intrusive and inappropriate and that cause marked anxiety or distress. Compulsions are repetitive behaviors (e.g., hand washing, ordering, checking) or mental acts (e.g., praying, counting, repeating words silently) the goal of which is to prevent or reduce anxiety or distress, not to provide pleasure or gratification. The Symptoms associated with OCD are severe and easily recognizable. One generally accepted causes of OCD is stress. Stress is a term used by many, is somewhat misunderstood, an ...
    Related: compulsive, compulsive disorder, disorder, obsessive, obsessive compulsive disorder
  • Obsessive Compulsive Disorder - 450 words
    Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is an illness that traps people in endless cycles of repetitive thoughts (obsessions) and behaviors (compulsions). Although we all have habits and routines that help us organize our daily lives, people with OCD develop patterns of behavior that take up too much time and interfere with their daily lives. Obsessions are unwanted and intrusive ideas, images and impulses that run through the person's mind over and over again. Sometimes these thoughts come only once in a while and are only mildly annoying, but at other times the thoughts come constantly and cause great distress. A compulsion is a behavior that is performed on purpo ...
    Related: compulsive, compulsive disorder, disorder, obsessive, obsessive compulsive disorder
  • Obsessive Compulsive Disorder - 1,780 words
    Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Are you the type of person who has a phobia of germs, dirt, or contaminated bodily fluids? Is the only way to feel safe and pure is for you to cleanse yourself countless times a day? Or maybe you`re the type of person who has to check things twice, three times or more. Perhaps you`re the type of person who has to do everything twice, or by a fixed number. Maybe you are the type of person who must have everything neatly placed, and if misplaced at all you throw a tantrum. If you are a person who happens to do any of these things then maybe you have OCD, the acronym for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (formerly known as obsessive neuro ...
    Related: anxiety disorder, compulsive, compulsive behavior, compulsive disorder, disorder, obsessive, obsessive compulsive disorder
  • A Comparison Of Freud And Fromm - 1,277 words
    A Comparison Of Freud And Fromm Sigmund Freud was born in Monrovia on May 6,1856. He entered the University of Vienna in 1873 at the age of 17. He finished his degree in 1881. Freud died in England in 1939. He was an active therapist, theorist and writer to the very end. ( Ewen 19-20) Erich Fromm was born four years after Freud in 1900 in Frankfurt, Germany. Unlike Freud, Fromm had no medical training in his background. He received his PHD from the University of Heidelberg and later studied at Berlin Psychoanalytic Institute. Erich Fromm died March 16, 1980 in Switzerland. (Ewen 187) While Freud and Fromm were contemporaries and shared some basic beliefs, their approach to most issues varied ...
    Related: comparison, erich fromm, freud, fromm, sigmund freud
  • A Streetcar Named Desire - 1,095 words
    A Streetcar Named Desire While it can be argued that all of the characters in Tennese Williams' play, A Streetcar Named Desire are living in an illusion, I do not think that all the characters are living an unreal existence, however some are, in particular Blanche, Stella and Stanley. Blanch, to some extent, is living in her own fantasy world plagued with delusions and outbursts. It is quite obvious that she is living an illusion. Stella is living an unreal existence in regards to the way in which she likes to pretend she is living in a happy home. Stanley is also, however to a much lesser extent, living an unreal existence. He is very self-centered and towards the end he seems to be living ...
    Related: named desire, streetcar, streetcar named, streetcar named desire, upper class
  • A Thematic Analysis Of Alfred Hitchcocks Psycho - 1,465 words
    A Thematic Analysis of Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho Arts- Movies A Thematic Analysis of Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho has been commended for forming the archetypical basis of all horror films that followed its 1960 release. The mass appeal that Psycho has maintained for over three decades can undoubtedly be attributed to its universality. In Psycho, Hitchcock allows the audience to become a subjective character within the plot to enhance the film's psychological effects for an audience that is forced to recognise its own neurosis and psychological inadequacies as it is comp  elled to identify, for varying lengths of time, with the contrasting personalities of the film's m ...
    Related: alfred, alfred hitchcock, psycho, thematic, thematic analysis
  • A Worn Path - 1,078 words
    A Worn Path Annonymous The search for justice causes one to act blindly through anger, rather than through reason. In Shakespeare's Hamlet, young Fortinbras, Laertes, and Hamlet were all looking to avenge the deaths of their fathers. They all acted on emotion, and this led to the downfall of two, and the rise to power of one. Since the Heads of the three major families were each murdered, the eldest sons of these families swore vengeance, and two of the three sons died while exacting their acts of vengeance. The central plot of Hamlet concerns a search for justice. There were three major families in the Tragedy of Hamlet. These were the family of King Fortinbras, the family of Polonius, and ...
    Related: a worn path, worn, worn path, king hamlet, uncle claudius
  • Alcoholism - 1,188 words
    Alcoholism I am sitting at home playing Nintendo with my roommate, jake, when I hear a knock at the door. I wonder who in the world would be coming over this late at night, because it's after midnight. As I open the door, the tired, bloodshot eyes of my upstairs neighbor, Steve, stare at me. "Hi Sam," Steve says. As he attempts to enter my apartment, he stumbles on the slight rise where the weather strip runs under the door. As he trips, his forehead smashes onto the edge of the coffee table leaving a deep and bloody gash. I run in the bathroom and grab a towel while Jake tries to help Steve. It doesn't take us long to realize that Steve is going to need stitches and is in no condition to dr ...
    Related: alcoholism, alcohol addiction, national academy, public health, concentration
  • Alcoholism - 1,581 words
    Alcoholism Alcoholism is a disease of epidemic proportions, affecting 9.3 to 10 million Americans, and many professionals believe the figures are closer to 20 million (Weddle and Wishon). Alcoholism is a "physiological or physiological dependence on alcohol characterized by the alcoholics inability to control the start or termination of his drinking"(Encyclopedia Britannica 210). It consists of frequent and recurring consumption of alcohol to an extent that causes continued harm to the drinker and leads to medical and social problems. Alcoholism, however, does not merely cause harm to the alcoholic, but to the entire family as well, affecting an estimated 28 million children in this country ...
    Related: alcoholism, high school, human beings, social problems, fail
  • Alcoholosm - 1,165 words
    ... ven a small head size. Furthermore, FAS children may develop hearing problems, heart defects and physical and behavioural problems. Researchers have also found that some children who were exposed to alcohol during fetal development show only some of the characteristics of FAS, these children are diagnosed as having fetal alcohol effects (FAE). However, both FAS and FAE individuals may have some degree of brain damage (Brent, 1991). Clearly, in addition to physiological, social, and psychological factors which all play a role in contributing to alcoholism, recent studies reveal that there may be a genetic predisposition to alcoholism. More specifically, medical research indicates that alc ...
    Related: natural history, university press, york oxford university press, science, abnormal
  • Anorexia - 1,543 words
    Anorexia It would seem today that eating disorders are on the rise. While this may be true, the numbers may appear to grow only because more cases are being brought out into the open. One interpretation of an eating disorder is termed as a relationship between the person and food that appears abnormal. Anorexia Nervosa is one of the most prevalent eating disorder diseases. The word Anorexia itself means, "lack of appetite," and as for the definition of Anorexia, Anorexia is an all encompassing pursuit of thinness, occurring most often in adolescents and young adult women. This is accomplished by avoidance of eating by any means possible. The person affected by Anorexia has an absolutely terr ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, blood pressure, fashion industry, relief
  • Anorexia - 670 words
    Anorexia In today's society, we often hear of people who suffer daily from illnesses such as cancer, AIDS, obsessive-compulsive disorder, phobias, tuberculosis, downs syndrome and many other types of illness both communicable and non-communicable. What about the illness that consumes the life of over eight million Americans, 90% being women? "Anorexia nervosa, in medicine a condition characterized by intense fear of gaining weight or becoming obese, as well as a distorted body image, leading to an excessive weight loss from restricting food intake and excessive exercise. Anorexia nervosa is not associated with any preexisting physical illness. It is found chiefly in adolescents, especially y ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, obsessive compulsive disorder, sports medicine, distorted
  • Anorexia Nervosa - 1,281 words
    ... r parents and teachers no longer sustain her. She is unable to acknowledge her sexual desires and may regard her developing woman's body as an alien invasion. Her fear of adult femininity may also be a fear of becoming like her mother. According to this theory, fasting restores a sense of order to her life by allowing her to exert control over herself and others. She is proud of her ability to lose weight, and self-imposed rules about food are a substitute for genuine independence. Some students of anorexia believe that these girls starve themselves to suppress or control feelings of emotional emptiness. They struggle for perfection to prove that they need not depend on others to tell th ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, nervosa, grolier multimedia encyclopedia, young woman
  • Anorexia Nervosa - 1,685 words
    Anorexia Nervosa Eating disorders are a cause for serious concern from both a psychological and a nutritional point of view. They are often a complex expression of underlying problems with identity and self concept. These disorders often stem from traumatic experiences and are influenced by society`s attitudes toward beauty and worth (Eating Disorder Resource Center, 1997). Biological factors, family issues, and psychological make-up may be what people who develop eating disorders are responding to. Anyone can be affected by eating disorders, regardless of their socioeconomic background (Eating Disorder Resource Center, 1997). Anorexia nervosa is one such disorder characterized by extreme we ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, nervosa, body image, serious concern
  • Anorexia Nervosa - 1,098 words
    Anorexia Nervosa Anorexia Nervosa is a very serious disease that is plaguing many young people in our society. This is something that is becoming more and more prevalent. It is something that should not be taken lightly. I have chosen to do my Science report on this topic, because it is something intriguing and it is found in many teens. This is a topic that is too foreign to many people and they need to be educated on the subject. I hope to help that in anyway I can. In the following paragraphs I will discuss the warning signs of anorexia, the people affected by the disease, the disease itself, and certain types of treatments for the disorder. Firstly, I would like to discuss the warning si ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, nervosa, common sense, eating disorder
  • Anorexia Nervosa - 1,038 words
    ... ted by mental problems. That is why it is more commonly found in teens. If a person is experiencing a lot of problems or stress it could cause them to stop eating and stay away from people. Many people are forced to this by the attitudes of other people. As I previously said, anorexia can develop by comparing yourself to super models. The bodies people see are nearly unobtainable, yet people will strive to look like them. This is when young girls will usually develop the disease. It sometimes will happen as a group. A bunch of girls will develop anorexia after watching a movie or reading a magazine with a thin girl that makes millions of dollars. Males will usually develop the disease wh ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, nervosa, eating disorder
  • Anorexia Nervosa Is Refusal To Maintain Body Weight At Or Above A Minimally Normal Weight For Age And Height Intense Fear Of - 1,280 words
    ... ers no longer sustain her. She is unable to acknowledge her sexual desires and may regard her developing woman's body as an alien invasion. Her fear of adult femininity may also be a fear of becoming like her mother. According to this theory, fasting restores a sense of order to her life by allowing her to exert control over herself and others. She is proud of her ability to lose weight, and self-imposed rules about food are a substitute for genuine independence. Some students of anorexia believe that these girls starve themselves to suppress or control feelings of emotional emptiness. They struggle for perfection to prove that they need not depend on others to tell them who they are and ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, body weight, height, intense, lose weight, nervosa
  • Attention Deficit Disorder - 1,480 words
    Attention Deficit Disorder Attention Deficit Disorder Five year old Danny is in kindergarten. It is playtime and he hops from chair to chair, swinging his arms and legs restlessly, and then begins to fiddle with the light switches, turning the lights on and off again to everyone's annoyance--all the while talking nonstop. When his teacher encourages him to join a group of other children busy in the playroom, Danny interrupts a game that was already in progress and takes over, causing the other children to complain of his bossiness and drift away to other activities. Even when Danny has the toys to himself, he fidgets aimlessly with them and seems unable to entertain himself quietly. To many, ...
    Related: attention deficit, attention deficit disorder, compulsive disorder, conduct disorder, defiant disorder, deficit, deficit disorder
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