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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: collective bargaining

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  • Collective Bargaining - 1,251 words
    Collective Bargaining Collective Bargaining: A Great Social Invention? = "There's strength in numbers" This is a clich, or could even be called a proverb that most of us have heard at some stage in our lives. It also lies at the heart of collective bargaining, and it provides a reasonable, although simplistic reason for the use of collective bargaining, and also gives us an indication of where and for whom it is most useful. Collective bargaining's origins lie in one of man's primary instincts; defence. In an industrial relations context this is defence of proper working conditions, secure employment and proper pay. Collective bargaining allowed this by gaining pay increases through the incr ...
    Related: bargaining, collective, collective bargaining, social issues, industrial relations
  • Collective Bargaining - 1,232 words
    ... al value of those wages dropped. It was during the era of the National Wage Agreements that inflation rose to 20%, days lost through strikes increased and unofficial strikes increased (Gunnigle et al, 1995). Although this may seem that this type of collective bargaining had a bad social influence, it must be noted that the OPEC recessions of the 1970's would have had been a contributing factor to all of the above. In 1987 the government, trade unions and the FUE negotiated the PNR. Other than the provisions for pay increases, social issues were taken into consideration: 'The programme was to cover the period up to the end of 1990 and entailed the following provisions: -The creation of a ...
    Related: bargaining, collective, collective bargaining, social aspects, social welfare
  • Collective Bargaining Agreements - 248 words
    Collective Bargaining Agreements TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction.Page 2 Management RightsPage 3 Union Security.Page 4 Wages and Benefits Page 5 Individual Security (Seniority) Rights..Page 6 Dispute Resolution..Page 7 Bibliography Page 10 COLLECTIVE BARGAINING AGREEMENTS A collective bargaining agreement collectively sets the terms on which an employer offers individual work contracts to each of its employees in the bargaining unit. A bargaining agreement, also herein referred to as a labor agreement, is a legally enforceable written commitment, which states the rights and duties of all parties involved. The labor agreement should be made in good faith and is intended to be observed and not v ...
    Related: bargaining, collective, collective bargaining, contents introduction, national labor
  • Collective Bargaining In The Workplace - 2,202 words
    Collective Bargaining In The Workplace Britain has one of the most developed systems of collective bargaining in the world, especially amongst manual workers. Its sophistication is one of the main reasons why British workers traditionally pressed less for the statutory provision of basic rights in the work place than their Continental colleagues. Most trade unionists prefer to put a grievance through procedure' rather than go to an industrial tribunal. Dubin has described collective bargaining as the great social invention that has institutionalised industrial conflict' and by the Donovan Commission as right which is or should be the prerogative of every worker in a democratic society'. It c ...
    Related: bargaining, collective, collective action, collective bargaining, workplace
  • Collective Bargaining In The Workplace - 2,241 words
    ... d by the parties to be a legally enforceable contract unless the agreement - (a) is in writing, and (b) contains a provision which (however expressed) states that the parties intend that the agreement shall be a legally enforceable contract (2) Any collective agreement which does satisfy these conditions in subsection (1)(a) and (b) above shall be conclusively presumed to have been intended by the parties to be a legally enforceable contract.' There are four main advantages claimed for the legal enforcement of collective agreements: (a) collective agreements would have to become both more comprehensive and more precise in defining the rights and obligations of each party if their meaning ...
    Related: bargaining, collective, collective bargaining, workplace, different levels
  • Strategies In Collective Bargaining - 1,347 words
    Strategies In Collective Bargaining The process of labor-management bargaining has evolved since its beginning in the early years of labor negotiations. Since the parties involved in collective bargaining are negotiating a formal contract that both are to be bound by, there are many stresses and tensions that permeate the process. Most early negotiations were filled with drama and emotionalism. The struggle has continued today to move toward a more rational process, whereby negotiations are conducted and settled on the facts and more concrete, quantitative arguments. In pursuit of this goal, there are strategies and tactics that can be utilized by both management and unionized labor in order ...
    Related: bargaining, collective, collective bargaining, fair labor, public opinion
  • 1994 Baseball Strike - 1,617 words
    1994 Baseball Strike On August 12, 1994 professional baseball players went on strike for the eighth time in the sports history. Since 1972, negotiations between the union and owners over contract terms has led to major economic problems and the absence of a World Series in 1994. All issues were open for debate due to the expiration of the last contract. Until 1968, no collective bargaining agreement had ever been reached between the owners and the players (Dolan 11). Collective bargaining is the process by which union representatives for employees in a bargaining unit negotiate employment conditions for the entire bargaining unit (Atlantic Unbound). Instead, the players were at the mercy of ...
    Related: baseball, baseball players, league baseball, major league baseball, strike
  • 1994 Baseball Strike - 1,626 words
    ... 94, the owners declared the cancellation of the World Series for the first time since 1904 (Atlantic Unbound). In mid-October, President Bill Clinton announced the appointment of William J. Usery, Jr., to mediate the dispute. The President could not have chosen a more able representative. Usery was Secretary of Labor in the Ford administration and before that was director of the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service. Although 70 years old, Usery had remained active after his Government service by privately mediating some of the Nations biggest industrial disputes in recent years. He had the experience to identify common ground and the tenacity to move the parties in that direction, ...
    Related: baseball, strike, labor law, labor review, director
  • Air Traffic Strike - 4,375 words
    Air Traffic Strike The Pressures of PATCO: Strikes and Stress in the 1980s By Rebecca Pels -------------------------------------------------- ---------------------- Note on electronic format: you can access any citation by clicking on the note number. In order to leave citations and return to the main text of the document, press the Back key on your viewer. -------------------------------------------------- ---------------------- On August 3, 1981 almost 13,000 air traffic controllers went on strike after months of negotiations with the federal government. During the contract talks, Robert Poli, president of the Professional Air Traffic Controllers Association (PATCO), explained the union's th ...
    Related: strike, traffic, traffic control, traffic controllers, aviation safety
  • Air Traffic Strike - 4,516 words
    ... emands rested upon prevailing norms of workers' interests and power. Since World War II, labor leaders have placed a disproportionate amount of emphasis on economic gains, and the collective bargaining process has gravitated toward these areas. At the same time, management has carefully guarded its prerogatives from the bargaining process.24 In this context, it seems likely that in envisioning a future strike, controllers felt that wages could and should be one aspect of it. Yet wages were not the decisive factor for most, and their other demands, derived from a far more vital, ideological interest than economic gains, evoked their passionate and surprisingly unified response. Individual ...
    Related: strike, traffic, traffic control, traffic controllers, worlds apart
  • Babyboom - 907 words
    Babyboom During the period between 1929 and 1953, the United States occupational pay ratios and earning inequality is declined, mainly across World War II (Ober 1948, Phelps Brown 1977, Williamson and Lindert 1980, Goldin and Margo 1922b). The evidence showed that the condition of income inequality was occurrence in that period. Moreover, the problem of income inequality is declined. But, the problem of income inequality is existed. The government cannot spread the income distibution evenly. Many reasons obstructed the income distribution evenly. In my discussion, I concentrate to explain five reasons to influence the income distribution in the United States in the 20th century. Changing in ...
    Related: collective bargaining, world war ii, work experience, abandoned, demographic
  • Bolsheviks In Wwi - 1,759 words
    Bolsheviks In Wwi There were several major sources of conflict between the Bolsheviks and the western states in Europe from 1917 to 1921. Conflicting ideologies that each attacked the core of each other's respective society led to the notion that Capitalism and Communism could not coexist. The attempts of both actors to hold control of their own political system and to expand their political ideas internationally led to major conflicts between them. Also, the lack of respect for the upstart of the Bolshevik government by the west led to misperceptions concerning the actions of the Soviets. Russia's unsatisfactory involvement World War I and its abrupt departure from the war, which affected t ...
    Related: bolshevik party, bolsheviks, britain france, private property, imperialist
  • Bus Law - 1,409 words
    Bus law Bus law There was a time when men played for the love of the game; when competition alone satisfied the male ego. This age of basketball featured greats such as Wilt Chamberlain, Bill Russell, and Oscar Robinson. These gladiators, and those like them, battled repeatedly winning league championships, MVPs, scoring titles, and other accolades. Then, the product of James Naismith moved into an era where the love continued, but money was added. Clyde Drexler, Charles Barkely, Reggie Miller and Tim Hardaway have become league "posterboys" for commercials and shoe contracts. Each of them has continued the competitive fires burning while adding a flare of green. Today, the league seems to b ...
    Related: labor unions, economic status, free agency, deserve
  • Bus Law - 1,392 words
    ... rs and emerging superstars entered the league and took it by storm. Earvin "Magic" Johnson and Larry Bird revolutionized the NBA. Magic and Bird defined the new ideal basketball player as the "versatile big man". Both men, six feet - nine inches tall, combined their size with great shooting touch, outstanding ball handling, and tremendous passing. Magic and Bird excited the crowds with their new styles and spectacular plays, as they influenced the rest of the league to change into a league based on their styles of play. More and more fans wanted to see this new style first hand, which garnered more revenue in the ticket office. Following the entrance of Magic and Bird was another individ ...
    Related: collective bargaining, chicago bulls, national basketball association, annually
  • Capitalsim History - 1,137 words
    Capitalsim History Capitalism Capitalism is the name given to the economic system that incorporates free enterprise and a market system by Karl Marx, the founder of communism. By the textbook definition, capitalism is an economic system in which private individuals and business firms carry on the production and the exchange of goods and services through a complex network of prices and markets. (Heilbroner1 13-15) Capitalism is a philosophy that originated in Europe, where it evolved and reached its pinnacle in the nineteenth century. During the nineteenth century capitalism spread throughout the world and to the United States. The United States adopted the ideas of capitalism and put them in ...
    Related: history, industrial revolution, adam smith, franklin d roosevelt, specialized
  • Caryl Churchill - 933 words
    Caryl Churchill Caryl Churchill is one of England's most premier females, modern playwrights. She has strived throughout her career as theatrical personality to make the world question roles, stereotypes and issues that are dealt with everyday, such as violence and political and sexual oppression. Not only has she been a strong force on the stage, but has also had strong influences with radio and television. Overall, this woman can simply be summarized to be a fascinating personality. Especially in a time where women did not have the same rights as women nowadays, we can safely infer that her feats represent her determination as a playwright as well as an actor. Churchill was born in London ...
    Related: churchill, cross gender, sexual discrimination, racial discrimination, column
  • Chilean Economic Shock Therapy - 1,146 words
    Chilean Economic Shock Therapy Chile is seen to be the quintessential model of liberal restructuring in Latin America in the late twentieth century. After the overthrow of the socialist regime of Salvador Allende in 1973, Chiles government has implemented an authoritative economic restructuring program that replaced state intervention with market incentives and opened Chile to the global economy. This four-phase process transformed the economy from highly protective industrialized to an open free market economy based on agricultural exports. The process by which the Chilean economy was stabilized was termed shock therapy. Like other dramatic economic policy changes, the therapy caused the un ...
    Related: chilean, economic benefits, economic change, economic crisis, economic growth, economic policy, shock
  • Economics Of Europe - 1,499 words
    Economics Of Europe The Effects of Post-Industrialism On the Political Economy of Western Europe The Decline of Corporatist Bargaining The sustained, high economic growth in Western Europe during the post-war period until 1973 led to dramatic changes in the region's political economy. As advances in transportation and communication extended the reach of international trade into new areas of the world, as technological advances allowed establishment of manufacturing facilities overseas, and as European real wages climbed to unprecedented heights, the industrial base that had served as the foundation for rapid Western European growth in the 1950's and 1960's increasingly moved to Western Europ ...
    Related: economic conditions, economic growth, economic performance, economics, western europe
  • Evolution Of Labor Unions - 884 words
    Evolution Of Labor Unions What is clearly evident is that the working people of America have had to unite in struggle to achieve the gains that they have accumulated during this century. Improvements did not come easily. Organizing unions, winning the right to representation, using the collective bargaining process as the core of their activities, struggling against bias and discrimination, the working men and women of America have built a trade union movement of formidable proportions. Labor in America has correctly been described as a stabilizing force in the national economy and a bulwark of our democratic society. Furthermore, the gains that unions have been able to achieve have brought ...
    Related: american labor, evolution, labor, labor law, labor movement, labor union, labor unions
  • From Heaven To Hell - 2,058 words
    From Heaven to Hell In the United States we often look to European and African countries for examples of dictatorship, civil war, inequality and genocide. In the 1990s, several countries experienced mass exodus, civil war, race war, religious war, and genocide. Yugoslavias Serbian population attempted to cleanse itself of Muslims and Croats, in Rwanda the Hutu population exterminated almost the entire Tutsi population, while in East Timor and several other countries refugees fled from the tyranny of "their" government. Less often however do we look, or even realize that our neighbors to the south are experiencing remarkably similar acts of violence, hate, and misuse of power. Bordered mostly ...
    Related: working class, collective bargaining, health care, tutsi, surround
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