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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: chronic pain

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  • 32 Doctors Later Still No Cure - 316 words
    32 Doctors Later Still No Cure Theres no way to describe the feeling of helplessness. Since I was a little girl, I can remember my mothers illness. I can remember her playing with us, regardless of how much pain she was in, just because she cared that much. Now Im eighteen, and the same woman still pushes aside her health to be a part of my life. I cannot describe the frustrations! 32 doctors later, still there is no cure, for her illness. After her diagnosis was read, she was referred to a chronic pain therapist. My mothers goals consist of getting out of bed, and eating. If she can accomplish these few things, her day is complete. The feeling is unsurpassable to me that my mother must live ...
    Related: cure, chronic pain, unfortunate, pray
  • Chinese Medicine - 1,489 words
    Chinese Medicine Acupuncture, Qigong, and Chinese Medicine Stephen Barrett, M.D. Chinese medicine, often called Oriental medicine or traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), encompasses a vast array of folk medical practices based on mysticism. It holds that the body's vital energy (chi or qi) circulates through 14 channels, called meridians, that have branches connected to bodily organs and functions. Illness is attributed to imbalance or interruption of chi.. Ancient practices such as acupuncture and Qigong are claimed to restore balance. Traditional acupuncture, as now practiced, involves the insertion of stainless steel needles into various body areas. A low-frequency current may be applied t ...
    Related: chinese, chinese medicine, herbal medicine, medicine, oriental medicine, traditional chinese, traditional chinese medicine
  • Chinese Medicine - 1,419 words
    ... tions. A parallel survey of 197 acupuncturists, who are more apt to see immediate complications, yielded 132 cases of fainting, 26 cases of increased pain, 8 cases of pneumothorax, and 45 other adverse results [10]. However, a 5-year study involving 76 acupuncturists at a Japanese medical facility tabulated only 64 adverse event reports (including 16 forgotten needles and 13 cases of transient low blood pressure) associated with 55,591 acupuncture treatments. No serious complications were reported.The researchers concluded that serious adverse reactions are uncommon among acupuncturists who are medically trained [11]. Questionable Standards In 1971, an acupuncture boom occurred in the Un ...
    Related: alternative medicine, chinese, chinese medicine, holistic medicine, medicine, oriental medicine, traditional chinese
  • Euthanaisa - 1,254 words
    Euthanaisa Euthanasia Euthanasia is, according to Webster dictionary, the act of killing an individual for the reason of mercy. This paper will examen the issue of active and passive euthanasia. Active euthanasia is an intervention that would cause death to take place when it would not otherwise happen. Passive euthanasia is the decision to withold help from an individual, ultimately leading to the death of the individual. This paper is supposed to deal with the circumstances, if any, that euthanasia, active or passive, would be morally permissible. Before I build the wall of moral delineation between these two scenarios, consider that they are but two possible choices on a broad continuum o ...
    Related: morally acceptable, natural process, webster dictionary, intervene, morally
  • Euthanasia - 626 words
    Euthanasia Euthanasia, which means "good" or "peaceful" death, has been practiced through the ages. Doctors have always been dedicated to the task of easing pain and suffering, to make dying easier. Adding the adjective "active" alters the meaning of euthanasia. The emphasis shifts from comforting the dying to inducing death. The practice of voluntary euthanasia and assisted suicide would cause society to devalue all life, especially the lives of the dying, the disabled, and the elderly. We should not understate the agonies involved in chronic pain and suffering. Nobody wants to see a loved one suffer or make the decisions that accompany medical science's ability to prolong life. The same te ...
    Related: active euthanasia, euthanasia, voluntary euthanasia, human life, human beings
  • History Of Depression - 1,829 words
    History Of Depression HISTORY OF DEPRESSION: Depressive illness has been known since biblical times. The word depression comes from the Latin word deprimere (to press down). Thus it means feeling pressed down, sad or low. In the late Middle Ages, religious leaders believed depression was caused by posession of evil spirits. The German religious reformer Martin Luther wrote All heaviness of the mind and melancholy comes of the Devil. Through the years depression has been treated with such remedies as whipping, bloodletting, exorcism and soothing baths. By the 1960s, antidepressant medications were discovered that relieved depression by correcting chemical imbalances in the brain and because o ...
    Related: history, major depression, manic depression, president abraham lincoln, high school
  • Holistic Medicine - 918 words
    Holistic Medicine In a lot of conditions, medical cures and treatments have proven more harmful than the disease itself. In looking for other options, people all over the world have been turning back to the holistic way of health and healing. Holistic medicine is the art and science of healing the WHOLE person, or in holistic terms, the mind body and spirit. The practice of holistic medicine integrates conventional and alternative therapies to prevent and treat diseases and promote optimal health. This condition of holistic health is defined as the ultimate free flow of life energy force throughout the mind, body, and spirit. As I mentioned before, three parts make up the whole person. Based ...
    Related: environmental medicine, holistic, holistic medicine, medicine, energy flow
  • Legalization Of Drugs - 1,061 words
    Legalization of Drugs Each year 1,600 innocent people are needlessly killed each year at the hands of drug criminals (Ostrowski 27). Enormous amounts of money are spent each year in the fight against drugs. Furthermore, there are actually sick people that need marijuana to ease their suffering. These are a few of the reasons why I believe that the legalization of marijuana would not only improve society, but the economy as well. Before writing this paper, I was under the impression that all drugs and anything that has to do with them are bad. However, as my research deepened, I found that there are more positives than negatives that would arise from the legalization of marijuana. First of al ...
    Related: drug enforcement, drug legalization, drug war, drugs, illegal drugs, legalization, war on drugs
  • Legalization Of Medicinal Marijuana - 603 words
    Legalization Of Medicinal Marijuana Legalization of Marijuana During the Carter, Reagan, and Bush administrations, eight people in the United States were allowed to use marijuana for medicinal purposes under the Compassionate Investigative New Drug program. However, since the Clinton administration no new applications have been accepted. Therefore, other patients who need marijuana to alleviate the nausea and loss of appetite associated with the AIDS viruses and cancer chemotherapy, as well as to treat glaucoma, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, chronic pain, and other ailments must continue to suffer without the use of marijuana. Is this fair? What could the reasoning behind this needless suffe ...
    Related: legalization, marijuana, marijuana legalization, medical use of marijuana, medicinal, medicinal marijuana
  • Legalize Pot - 985 words
    Legalize Pot There is no denying that the drug problem in our country today has reached epidemic proportions. The problem has gotten so out of hand that many options are being considered to control and/or solve it. Ending the drug war may not seem to be the best answer at first, but the so-called war on drugs has actually accomplished very little. Different options need to be considered. Legalization is an option that hasn't gotten much of a chance, but should be given one. It is my position that marijuana should be legalized. Although many people feel that the legalization of marijuana would result in an increase in the amount of crime and drug abuse, I contend that the opposite is true. Wh ...
    Related: legalize, crime rate, acquired immune deficiency, criminal prosecution, participation
  • Lumbar Disc Problems - 1,622 words
    Lumbar Disc Problems Summary The lumbar region of the human spine is a location that is very susceptible to injury and trauma. A majority of the population experience back pain at some time during their life, and although in most cases the pain subsides after a time of rest, there is an enormous need for treatment of this malady. The various types of treatment for lumbar disc herniations include a more conservative method of rest, physical therapy, and anti-inflammatory or non-steroidal drugs. A more extreme condition would require surgery to try to alleviate the symptoms. The older, more traditional surgery is a posterior laminotomy, however, newer less invasive microscopic and endoscopic s ...
    Related: disc, lumbar, positive effects, physical activity, unhappy
  • Marijuana And Its Legalization - 890 words
    Marijuana And Its Legalization : Marijuana: The legalization ***************************** Their Side: After the sustaining vote in November of 1996 and coming into effect the beginning of this year, marijuana is now legal to medical patients in California and Arizona. Proposition 215 reads as follows: The people of the State of California hereby find and declare that the purposes of the Compassionate Use Act of 1996 are as follows: (A) To ensure that seriously ill Californians have the right to obtain and use marijuana for medical purposes where that medical use is deemed appropriate and has been recommended by a physician who has determined that the person's health would benefit from the u ...
    Related: legalization, marijuana, medical purposes, more work, arizona
  • Marijuana Should Be Legal - 1,205 words
    Marijuana Should Be Legal Seven Leaves Aren't Bad: Marijuana Should Be Legal Thesis: Should marijuana be legalized and can it be used in positive ways? In 1937, the Marijuana Tax Stamp Act prohibited the use, sale, and cultivation of hemp/marijuana in the United States. Marijuana is a drug that is highly used through out the world. It comes from the cannabis plant. THC which stands for delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol is the major psychoactive ingredient. Over sixty five million Americans today use marijuana. Today it is a lot stronger than how it used to be in the 1970's because of careful cultivation. It can be smoked threw a pipe, joint, or it can even be used as an ingredient in food. Althou ...
    Related: marijuana, marijuana prohibition, health risks, drug war, advice
  • Medical Marijuana - 1,182 words
    Medical Marijuana Medical Marijuana Marijuana prohibition applies to everyone, including the sick and dying. Of all the negative consequences of prohibition, none is as tragic as the denial of medical marijuana to the tens of thousands of seriously ill patients who could benefit from its therapeutic use. It is clear from available studies and rapidly accumulating anecdotal evidence that marijuana is therapeutic in the treatment of a number of serious ailments and is less toxic and costly than many conventional medicines for which it may be substituted.1 Most recently, a federally commissioned report by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) determined that, Marijuanas active components are ...
    Related: legalize marijuana, marijuana, marijuana prohibition, medical marijuana, medical use of marijuana
  • Medical Marijuana - 1,260 words
    Medical Marijuana One of the most controversial issues in the United States is over medical marijuana. Many experiments test the validity of the drug as a medicine, and results of these experiments receive much praise but also some critique. The DEA and the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML) are battling over the issue. The underlying matter that cannot be ignored is that marijuana proves to be a useful medication for many patients, especially those with wasting diseases such as AIDS and cancer. In 1996 California passed Proposition 215, which allowed the use of medical marijuana (4444). Since then, six other states have made medical marijuana legal; Alaska, Arizo ...
    Related: marijuana, marijuana laws, medical college, medical marijuana, medical use of marijuana
  • Music Therapy - 1,527 words
    Music Therapy Music Therapy During the past thirty years, concepts in the mental health profession have undergone continuous and dramatic changes. A relatively new type of therapy is musical therapy, which incorporates music into the healing process. Music therapy also is changing, and its concepts, procedures, and practices need constant reevaluation in order to meet new concepts of psychiatric treatment. The idea of music as a healing influence which could affect health and behavior is as least as old as the writings of Aristotle and Plato. The 20th century discipline began after World War I and World War II when community musicians of all types, both amateur and professional, went to Vete ...
    Related: american music, background music, music, music therapy, therapy
  • Music Therapy - 1,096 words
    Music Therapy Music therapy is the prescribed use of music and musical interventions in order to restore, maintain, and improve emotional, physical, physiological, and spiritual health and well-being (Lindberg). So one finds the selections under the New Age/Relaxation section of the record store about as relaxing as water torture? Just because one's taste runs more to Sousa than to soothing doesn't mean one can't reap all these relaxation benefits music is supposed to have. Music therapy works primarily by changing moods, which alters brain chemistry. This can have many effects--making concentration easier, easing anxiety and fostering patience(Hendrick-16). "Music," as the old saying goes, ...
    Related: music, music therapy, therapy, different kinds, mental illness
  • Obedience - 1,110 words
    Obedience Psychologists, social scientists and writers have long been interested in the whys of obedience and disobedience; many experiments have been conducted to help in understanding these issues and the influences exerted by outside forces on individuals in their decision making processes. Unthinking obedience can be as dangerous as unthinking rebellion in any society, neither is done with self-reflection as a part of the process; however, care must be used in determining the appropriate time for thoughtful disobedience so that society is not destroyed by the dissention. In a short story by Shirley Jackson entitled The Lottery, reprinted in Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum (382) ...
    Related: obedience, chronic pain, decision making, general psychiatry, partial
  • Pain Medicine - 865 words
    Pain Medicine IMPLANTABLE INFUSION DEVICES FOR LONG TERM PAIN MANAGEMENT; EXAMINATION OF ITS EFFECTIVENESS AGAINST OTHER MEASURES I reviewed 36 available articles up to date in order to answer the above question. In my presentation I will start by giving background information about chronic pain. I will discuss different types of delivery systems available, their benefits to the patient, as well as disbenefits, and cost. Chronic pain reduces the quality of life in many patients and restricts their ability to engage in normal daily activities. Although many pain patients may be managed in the long term on oral medications, there is percentage of this population that needs additional or altern ...
    Related: chronic pain, medicine, pain management, side effects, life expectancy
  • Pain Theories - 1,460 words
    Pain Theories Pain has been experienced by everyone regardless of age, gender or economic status. Pain is usually described as unfavorable experience that has a lasting emotional and disabling influence on the individual. Theories that explain and assist in understanding what pain is, how it originates and why we feel it are the Specificity theory, Pattern Theory and Gate theory. In this paper I will attempt to demonstrate my understanding of the theories and also will be critically analyzing the theories about the experience of pain by incorporating relevant concepts from literature and relating it to psychology. Pain has been described with a wide range of different words. McCaffery (cited ...
    Related: chronic pain, major theories, economic status, significant impact, liner
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