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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: christian doctrine

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  • A Comparison Of Judaism, Islam, Christianity - 1,507 words
    A Comparison Of Judaism, Islam, & Christianity Religion is one of the driving forces behind many of the events and attitudes that have shaped our world. Throughout the centuries, laws have been enacted; cities and countries have been created and destroyed; and wars have been fought, all to promulgate or protect one religion or another. This paper will examine aspects of the three major Western religions of the world: Judaism, Islam, and Christianity. Topics covered will include the origin of all three religions, the view of God held by each tradition, and conflicts. Several of the beliefs of these religions will be examined, such as judgment, and the Trinity. Origin of Judaism The origins of ...
    Related: christianity, christianity and islam, christianity religion, comparison, great religions
  • Are Science And Religion One - 2,036 words
    Are Science And Religion One? Are Science and Religion One? Introduction I have identified the axiom of mysticism (TAM) as the scientific, religious and philosophical fact that there is only one thing that exists. Because the meaning of mysticism is commonly misunderstood this definition needs some clarification. The dictionary defines mysticism as a personal relationship with God. Given this definition it is easy to see why I have named the theory that, everything existent and non-existent is God, as the axiom of mysticism. If the theory is correct then a personal relationship with God is mandatory because God is all that can be experienced. After being confronted with TAM for the first tim ...
    Related: physical science, religion, science, general relativity, modern physics
  • Are Science And Religion One - 2,121 words
    ... rature if there is only one thing that exists? By definition temperature is the speed and frequency of collisions between particles. Thus we find ourselves once more in a paradoxical situation. On the one hand the equations predict a specific temperature greater than zero but, on the other hand, the unified state must be at temperature zero because there are no particle interactions. This tendency to paradox displayed by the equations of cosmology and built into the foundations of mathematics, if looked at squarely and taken at face value, is telling us something profound about the structure of the world. Paradox is built into the fabric of the universe in a profound and interesting way. ...
    Related: religion, science, face value, moral implications, advent
  • Boethius - 1,879 words
    Boethius Throughout history, every society has searched for some way to express its feelings and beliefs. Music has been an integral part of virtually every culture, so it is quite natural for people to have written about this subject. More literature has survived than actual music, which leaves modern scholars with the job of translating, interpreting, and trying to understand the writings of people prior to modern musical notation. Anicius Manlius Severinus Boethius wrote and translated many books on subjects he felt were important to the education of future generations. Of particular interest is his book, The Fundamentals of Music (De institutione musica). Even though this book is no long ...
    Related: boethius, eighteenth century, ancient world, tudor england, depth
  • Byzantine Empire - 1,969 words
    Byzantine Empire The greatest of medieval civilizations was the Eastern Roman Empire. The Roman Empire was divided in 395. The Western half, ruled from Rome, was ruled by the barbarians in the 5th century. The Eastern half, known as the Byzantine Empire, lasted for more than over 1,000 years. The Byzantine Empire was one of the leading civilizations in the world. In 324, Constantine, the first Christian emperor, became the single ruler of the Roman Empire. He set up his Eastern headquarters at the ancient Greek colony of Byzantium in 330. This city, later renamed Constantinople, was also known as new Rome. It became the capital of the Byzantines after the Roman Empire was divided. Constantin ...
    Related: byzantine, byzantine art, byzantine empire, empire, roman empire
  • Candide: A Critical Analysis - 425 words
    Candide: A Critical Analysis Defining optimism and redefining the philosophies of the fictional Pangloss and the non-fictional Leibniz, Candid embarks on a mishap journey. From the very onset, Voltaire begins stabbing with satire, particularly at religion. Candide, which has been credited the base for the book and movie Forrest Gump, features a main character teeming with naivet. Pangloss says all is for the better and Candide lives by this edict with unaltered optimism. Faced with death and fatigue, Candide is befriended only to be enlisted in the Bulgarian army. Escaping death a few more times, he sees the pains of war and masks the pain with philosophy. Sails are set for Portugal and Jame ...
    Related: critical, critical analysis, forrest gump, christian doctrine, fictional
  • Coming To The New World - 1,119 words
    Coming To The New World Coming to the New World was a major advancement in the lives of many Spanish, French, and English people between the years of 1942-1629. The migration effected the lives dramatically. They will come to see that in the coming years almost everything will change from religion to their types of settlement. The role of religion was very important, for it had an immense power over the European society. Christianity converted all of Europe including the Spanish, French, and English. Christian doctrine provided a common understanding of God. The church provided authority and discipline in the society. Every village had a church, which thought that Satan constantly challenged ...
    Related: religious conversion, catholic church, king phillip, aztec, netherlands
  • Cosmogony - 1,060 words
    ... ot know anything about God or the creation of the universe. The acknowledgement of different religious viewpoints, the establishment of the agnostic position, and the use of the empiricist principle, are new ideas used in the argument for the origin of the universe. The 18th century Enlightenment values are highly evident in Hume's text. It is obvious how the 13th century argument presented by Aquinas has changed in order to accommodate the new viewpoints available in the 18th century. Through the analysis of Hume's work, and put in comparison with earlier views, the development of the argument for the origin of the universe is easily identifiable. John F. Haught in Science and Religion: ...
    Related: cosmogony, changing nature, point of view, big bang theory, mediate
  • Doctrine Of Creation - 1,325 words
    Doctrine Of Creation Doctrine of creation 'What do we mean by creation? How helpful are making, emanation and/or artistic work as analogies? Is it a doctrine about the world's beginnings or origin, or about its present or future existence, or what? Creation is often referred to as a 'mystery' and this is due to its perhaps ambiguous nature. Christian theology defines creation in many different ways, which differ greatly as viewpoints on the same theme. John Macquarrie tries to make the mystery clearer by using two analogies to try to describe what creation actually is. The first of these is that of 'making'. This is best understood alongside the literal understanding of creation, which can b ...
    Related: christian doctrine, doctrine, free will, natural law, affinity
  • Four Cardinal Virtues - 1,618 words
    Four Cardinal Virtues In our study of the four cardinal virtues we have been learning many ideas and theories on how to live "the good life." It was very difficult in the beginning of this semester to define what "the good life" means. After studying the virtues and their theories it became very clear to us what "the good life" is all about. Josef Pieper, the author of the book we have been studying, has made it very simple to understand how to be a good human being. Christian thinking and morality has played a major role in the understanding of the four virtues. The so-called four cardinal virtues that we have been studying are prudence, justice, fortitude, and temperance. According to Piep ...
    Related: cardinal, human beings, christian ethics, christian doctrine, prototype
  • Hate Crimes - 1,181 words
    Hate Crimes Homosexual people make up ten percent of the population; that means if you are sitting in a classroom of thirty, then more than likely three of those people are gay. However, this overwhelmingly large minority group continues to be one of the least protected by the government as well as most heavily targeted by discrimination and hate crimes. Regardless of the powerful shift in public opinion on homosexuality during the last twenty years and the outcry for more government intervention in the case of hate crimes and other such atrocities, the laws have remained invariable. A hate crime is an act of aggression against an individual's actual or perceived race, ethnicity, religions, ...
    Related: crime statistics, hate crime, hate crimes, public opinion, freedom of speech
  • History Paper - 971 words
    HISTORY PAPER "The Spanish Debate on the Americas" Juan Gins de Sepulveda, Bartolom de las Casas, and Francisco de Vitoria arguments pertaining to the settlement and colonization of the native people of America, while presented in different manors, are all the same. All three Spaniards believed that the barbarians had to accept the rule of the Spanish because the Spanish were mentally superior, and divine and natural laws gave the Spanish the right to conquer and enslave the native people of America. The foundation for Spanish conquests was their interpretation of the bible. Ironically, it was the teachings of the bible they were all trying to bring to the newly found infidels. Sepulveda sta ...
    Related: history, the bible, native people, use of force, conquer
  • Martin Luther - 495 words
    Martin Luther Martin Luther In this paper I will write about Martin Luther and how I agree with what he did for our religious beliefs. I feel that any person who will stand up for what he or she believes in is best thing you could do. If no one ever stood up for what they believed in then we wouldn't be free like we are today. I will include some quotes from my readings to give a brief description as to why I agree. I would first like to say that when Martin Luther was hit by a bolt of lightning and decided that he would have to enter a monastery, because he hoped that a penitential life would help him overcome his sense of guilt. This makes it obvious that he believes in god and doing right ...
    Related: luther, martin, martin luther, christian doctrine, brief description
  • Martin Luther And Bible Translation - 635 words
    Martin Luther And Bible Translation Martin Luther was born on November 10, 1483. He lived on a farm where his parents raised seven children. He began his schooling at age four and he later entered the monastery when he was twenty-two in 1505. After entering the monastery a good friend of Luthers passed away. This traumatic experience made Luther start thinking about life, death, and his destiny. Pondering these new thoughts led Luther to focus on Christian studies. On April 4, 1507 Luther was ordained a priest. With his new status among the church Luther was cautious because not only did he respect the power of God he also feared it. There were many scholars that translated the bible from Gr ...
    Related: bible, luther, martin, martin luther, the bible, translation
  • Mere Christianity By Lewis - 2,910 words
    ... ves his life. C.S. Lewis begins his book, "Mere Christianity", by introducing the Law of Right and Wrong or the Laws of Nature. This, however, arises a question. What is the Law of Nature? The Law of Nature is the known difference between right and wrong. That is, mans distinction between what is right and what is wrong. "This law was called the Law of Nature because people thought that everyone knew it and did not need to be taught it"(18). Lewis relates the law to how we treat others. We treat others the way we want to be treated and if they treat us poorly in return we become agitated and annoyed with them. He states that we become a society of excuses when something goes wrong. He go ...
    Related: c. s. lewis, christianity, lewis, mere, mere christianity
  • Purpose - 514 words
    Purpose Essentially, The Grapes of Wrath is a novel of social protest. It was designed to inform the public of the migrant's plight. It is a plea for the land owners of California and the banks in the dust bowl states to be more tolerant. It shows how the migrants were made to starve by the California land owners and banks just so they could turn a profit. It shows many of the methods that they used to cheat the migrants out of money and keep them from organizing. Ma Joad Ma Joad is the backbone of the Joad family. When things were really bad the family turned to her and not to Pa. The family gauged their own emotions by looking at her reaction. She knew that if she faltered then the whole f ...
    Related: first half, christian doctrine, grapes of wrath, casy, fallen
  • Responsibility Of Sharing Godgiven Light - 1,766 words
    Responsibility Of Sharing God-Given Light Romans 3:1-24: Responsibility of sharing God-given light. The law requires perfect righteousness. All people on the same level Righteousness in man. Having knowledge without knowing God is not worth while . Paul states that setting aside one's Body is of no use: chapter 3:1-4. Paul asks what kind of advantage do the Jews have. God gave them many promises of responsibilities. The prophet Abraham was called for the special task of doing God's work. His children and their children found special with God because God loved Abraham. To these people God showed special blessings. God has given these people gifts and talents so they in turn can influence othe ...
    Related: sharing, chosen people, the bible, human nature, wicked
  • Sir Gawain And The Green Knight: The Role Of Women - 1,194 words
    ... the rules of carving and distributing the days spoils. While the hunt is going on Gawain is lying in bed, and this is mentioned in each hunting scene to emphasize the contrast. In contrast to the hunt scenes, Gawain's situation seems too pleasurable, bordering on the sin of luxury and representing a private world outside of the traditional hierarchies, rules and loyalties. The Lady is not just suggesting certain moral associations to the reader; she is a real temptress testing his chastity and a real object of courtly love, testing his courtesy. As she presses him more and more aggressively as each day passes, the conflict between his spiritual love and courtly love becomes apparent, fo ...
    Related: gawain, green chapel, green knight, sir gawain and the green knight, virgin mary
  • The Crucible - 5,762 words
    The Crucible ARTHUR MILLER: THE AUTHOR AND HIS TIMES In Salem, Massachusetts, a dozen teen-age girls and a black slave woman are caught dancing in the woods around a bubbling cauldron. Today, you wouldn't even use the word caught. You might think these girls were strange, but you'd hardly call the cops on them. But it's 1692, and Salem isn't just an ordinary small town; it's a religious community of the strictest kind. The people and their laws are as harsh as the Massachusetts winter. When two of the girls pass out from fright and can't be revived, the others find themselves in serious trouble. Women who dance with the Devil are witches; and witches, when they are caught, are hanged. To get ...
    Related: crucible, the crucible, off broadway, reverend samuel parris, senator
  • The Crucible - 5,780 words
    ... nothing of sticking a needle two inches into her own belly in order to bring about the murder of Elizabeth Proctor. And she gets away with most of it. But Abigail isn't a child. She's had a grown-up love affair with John Proctor, and has lost her childish faith in the lying lessons I was taught by all these Christian women and their covenanted men. A child, when hurt, may strike back in anger. But only an adult could so coolly plot and execute the ingenious revenge Abigail plans for Elizabeth. The important thing to decide about Abigail is whether you think she's evil or not. Without doubt, almost all her actions have evil consequences, and if there is good in her, we don't get to see m ...
    Related: crucible, the crucible, point of view, real world, goodness
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