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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: chorus

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  • Life In Dithyrambic Chorus - 1,240 words
    Life In Dithyrambic Chorus Upon the setting sun I, Hecubus, fondly recall the days of pride and honor I felt in my tribe, as a member of a dramatic, dithyrambic chorus. Acting was not simply my occupation, but a lifestyle highly revered and respected by my fellow Athenian citizens. We entertained, taught moral lessons of the past, illustrated human flaw, but most importantly, we gave the audience a release. During the time I preformed with my chorus, drama was closely tied to the polis, joining the people, the government, and the Gods through public festivals. I felt immense pride to have played and active role in the community bond that was created. The most important of these festivals was ...
    Related: chorus, macmillan publishing company, military service, political power, interaction
  • Medea And Chorus - 529 words
    Medea And Chorus The exchange that takes place between Medea and the Chorus serves several purposes in Euripides' tragedy, The Medea. It allows us to sympathize with Medea in spite of her tragic flaws. It also foreshadows the tragic events that will come to pass. Finally, it contrasts rationality against vengeance and excess. The Chorus offers the sane view of the world to the somewhat insane characters of Medea, Jason, and Creon. As the passage begins on page 176, the leader of the Chorus reveals that she has high regards for Medea despite the fact that she is "savage still." She acknowledges Medea as a foreigner and an outsider and yet is sympathetic towards her. This alliance is apparentl ...
    Related: chorus, medea, human nature, tragic hero, supporting
  • Medeas Plan Is To Kill Jasons New Bride And His Two Children She Had Bore For Him And Then Flee For Athens The Chorus Tries T - 231 words
    Medea's plan is to kill Jason's new bride and his two children she had bore for him and then flee for Athens. The chorus tries to console Medea and tell her not to do such horrid things to other people particularly her children. Medea ignores their request and is stuck with the decision of whether or not to kill her children. She loves them and does not want to but she knows she must kill them to get back at her husband who had wronged her though she had done so much for him. She goes through with the act of killing Jason's new bride - Medea's children bring her a poisoned gown, which also ends up killing the King of Corinth. - And then faces the tough act of murdering her own children who s ...
    Related: athens, bride, chorus, greek tragedy, deed
  • The Greek Chorus - 482 words
    The Greek Chorus Greek tragedy and comedy originated with the chorus, the most important part of the performance space was the orchestra, which means 'a place for dancing' (orchesis). A typical tragic Greek chorus was a group of some twelve to fifteen masked men just about to enter military service after some years of training (Athenians were taught to sing and dance from a very early age.) An old comedic chorus consisted of up to twenty four men. The effort of dancing and singing through three tragedies and a satyr play was likened to that of competing in the Olympic Games. Like in Elizabethan theatre, the men portrayed women. They made the transitions between scenes, giving actors the chan ...
    Related: chorus, greek, greek tragedy, female characters, olympic games
  • The Personality Of The Chorus In Terms Of Oedipus - 835 words
    The Personality Of The Chorus In Terms Of Oedipus In Oedipus the King, Sophocles utilizes the chorus to function as the embodiment of the reasoning process. Throughout the play, the chorus personality gradually evolves as information pertaining to Oedipus becomes disclosed. The progression of the chorus personality can be divided into three distinct stages: supportive and reliant on Oedipus, uncertain about the circumstances presented against Oedipus and commiserating Oedipus fall. In each stage, the chorus serves a background to all interactions and provides the prospective Sophocles desires the audience (or readers) to grasp. The chorus also creates a sense of unity and cohesiveness which ...
    Related: chorus, oedipus, oedipus the king, personality
  • A Fairy Tale - 1,199 words
    ... the forest; he greeted the seven occupants like old friends, as they were. He handed over the bag, they had all been given instructions from 'The leader' ('O Great Master of Evil, Satan, King of Darkness, Beelzebub, Lucifer the Dragon, Slayer of Heaven, Serpent of Eden, Devil of hell', or what ever every one was calling him today). The baby was to be brought up in the forest; she should stay hidden from all. She was to have no contact with witches, humans, good fairies or elves; above all she was to be brought up evil or at least tainted, and be included in their satanic worship. She was also never to learn about her fate, and no one was to be told her whereabouts, as this could clearly ...
    Related: fairy, fairy tale, tale, the prince, tall
  • A Reflection On Paul Hindemith - 1,231 words
    A Reflection On Paul Hindemith Paul Hindemith was revolutionary and a musical genius. Many people who lived around the same time saw him as nothing more than an untalented noisemaker. Granted, these people didnt have all of the various forms of music that we have today, but untalented would not be a word I would use to describe Paul Hindemith. He helped begin the last great change in classical music from the Romantic Era, which was very tonal and diatonic, to 20th Century Modern Music, which is extremely atonal. Diatonic means within in the key. In other words, everything sounds nice and pretty. There are no weird noises, no funny pitches. Atonal itself is defined as the avoidance of the tra ...
    Related: reflection, emory university, heart attack, yale university, zurich
  • A Separate Peace: Chapter 1 - 5,644 words
    ^^^^^^^^^^A SEPARATE PEACE: CHAPTER 1 Have you ever in your life gone through an experience so intense, so joyful, so painful, or just so important at the time, that you could only understand much later what truly happened? Isn't it a fact that when we're in the middle of an experience, we are often unable to think clearly about it because we're too busy feeling the moment's thrill or sadness to stop and come to sensible conclusions? Our high school years are just such a time: of quick growth and self-discovery, of forging as well as breaking friendships, of proving ourselves to others, in the classroom and on the sports field, and a time when we want very much to be individuals and to stick ...
    Related: separate peace, competitive edge, power over, john knowles, legs
  • A Touch Of Elegance - 1,997 words
    A Touch Of Elegance "What is needed in order to really become a star is an extra element which God gives you or doesn't give you. You're born with it. You cannot learn it. God kissed Audrey Hepburn on the cheek and there she was" (Harris 11). Seen as an angel by all those who adored her, Audrey Hepburn portrayed the true image of a Hollywood star. Her grace and elegance touched all those whom she met and her death brought sorrow to millions. Living her life as a princess, Audrey had everything she had ever dreamed of. But her journey to such an end was not easy. Living through the devastation of World War II was only one of the many struggles and triumphs Audrey had to face throughout her li ...
    Related: formal education, latin america, real world, purple, learner
  • Adrienne Rich - 1,719 words
    Adrienne Rich "What I know, I know through making poems" Passion, Politics and the Body in the Poetry of Adrienne Rich Liz Yorke, Nottingham Trent University, England This paper is largely extracted from my book Adrienne Rich, which is to be published by Sage in October this year...What I have tried to do for the paper is to track one thread explored by the book, which I feel runs through the whole span of Rich's thought, a thread which links desire, passion, and the body - to politics, to activism, and to the writing of poetry. Writing poetry, above all, involves a willingness to let the unconscious speak - a willingness to listen within for the whispers that tell of what we know, even thou ...
    Related: adrienne, adrienne rich, natural order, unconscious mind, feminism
  • Agamemnons Clytemnestra - 1,254 words
    Agamemnon's Clytemnestra Analysis of Clytemnestra's Character in Agamemnon In Aeschylus' tragedy Agamemnon the character of Clytemnestra is portrayed as strong willed woman. This characteristic is not necessarily typical of women of her time. As a result, the reader must take a deeper look into the understanding of Clytemnestra. In Agamemnon she dominates the action. Her most important characteristic is like the watchman calls it, male strength of heart. She is a strong woman, and her strength is evident on many occasions is the play. Later in the play after Clytemnestra murders her husband, Agamemnon, and his concubine, Cassandra, she reveals her driving force and was has spurned all of her ...
    Related: clytemnestra, in exile, trojan war, impending, ashamed
  • Alighieri, Dante The Divine Comedy - 1,760 words
    Alighieri, Dante The Divine Comedy The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri (1265 - 1321) Type of Work: Allegorical religious poem Setting Hell, Purgatory and Paradise; A.D. 1300 Principal Characters Dante, the Pilgrim Virgil, the Poet, and Dante's guide Beatrice, Dante's womanly ideal and religious inspiration Story Overview Prologue: Dante, realizing he has strayed from the "true way,. into worldliness, tells of a vision where he travels through all the levels of Hell, up the mount of Purgatory, and finally through the realms of Paradise, where he is allowed a brief glimpse of God. The traveler sets out on the night before Good Friday, and finds himself in the middle of a dark wood. There he e ...
    Related: comedy, dante, dante alighieri, divine, divine comedy
  • Allegory Of American Pie By Don Mclean - 1,202 words
    Allegory of American Pie by Don McLean A Piece of the "Pie" Ask anyone what was the defining moment in the rock history of the 1960s was and all you will get is a one word answer: Woodstock. The three day rock festival that defined an era was only one of many music festivals of the 60s. But Woodstock has come to symbolize, "an era of peaceful, free- loving, drug- taking hippie youth, carefree before harsher realities hit..." (Layman 40). The Woodstock festival ended a century filled with many metamorphoses of rocknroll, from the era of pop music to the rebirth of folk music to the invention of acid rock. But some cynics say that rocknroll died with the death of Buddy Holly before the 60s eve ...
    Related: allegory, american, american art, folk music, the courtroom
  • Alvin Ailey - 537 words
    Alvin Ailey Every company has what is known as a "signature piece," that is, a work which expresses something about the artistic direction and the spirit of the company. For the Alvin Ailey Dance Theater that piece is Revelations. Choreographed and set to traditional music, Revelations was first performed at the Ninety-second Street YM-YWHA New York, NY., January 31, 1960. The lead dancers were Joan Derby, Minnie Marhsall, Merle Derby, Dorene Richardson, Jay Fletcher, Nathaniel Horne, and Herman Howell and the soloists were Nancy Redi and Gene Hobgood. The music was performed by the Music Masters Guild Chorus of the Harlem Branch YMCA under the direction of Frank Thomas. The piece as origina ...
    Related: alvin, los angeles, young people, martha graham, continuing
  • Analysis Of Haydns Emperor And Mozarts Requiem - 1,268 words
    Analysis of Haydn's Emperor and Mozart's Requiem On February 8, 2000 I attended a concert presented by the Festival Chamber Music Society. The performers were a string quartet and a French horn. Eriko Sato is a violinist who has won the Tibor Varga International competition and has appeared as a soloist with the Louisville and Tokyo Imperial orchestras. Laurie Smukler is also a violinist. She is a graduate of Juliard where she studied with Ivan Galamian. She was also a founding member of the Mendelssohn String Quartet. Ruth Sommers was the director and the cellist. She too is graduate of Julliard and studied with Leonard Rose and Harvey Shapiro. Steven Taylor play the oboe. He is a member of ...
    Related: amadeus mozart, emperor, joseph haydn, requiem, wolfgang amadeus mozart
  • Ancient Greek Theater And Drama - 1,400 words
    Ancient Greek Theater And Drama Ancient Greek Theater and Drama Ancient Greek Theater and Drama Jennifer Mills Theater has been an integral part of almost every society for thousands of years. Starting in the last Sixth century B.C. Theater has been evolving into the glitzy, whirlwind productions of today. But in the beginning, theater was a simple affair. Originating in Greece, theater tradition was derived from religious rituals. The ceremonies of the cult of Dionysus were exuberant; much story telling took place in the form of song and dance. Everyone would partake in the story telling, forming what is known as the chorus. The first man to step out of the chorus and take a role of a chara ...
    Related: drama, greek, greek theater, theater, excellent education
  • Ancient Greek Theatre - 817 words
    Ancient Greek Theatre Ancient Greek Theater Imagine this following scene: You are sitting in a dark, fairly crowded large room. There are hundreds of other people, in hundreds of other seats surrounding you. In front of you, there is a large stage, with people acting out a play. Lights, music, and different sound effects set the mood of the play for you to understand more clearly what is going on. With these certain conventions, viewer can get a real grasp of a story in which several actors are trying to portray. However, it hasn't always been this easy to enjoy a play in a theater. Theatre and plays go back as far as "b.c." times. In the Greek theater, the conventions are very different. Un ...
    Related: early greek, greek, greek life, greek theater, greek tragedy, theatre
  • Angels - 1,361 words
    Angels Angels When hearing the word angel, there is a wide choice of common images one can think of. One might think of a loved friend, a beautiful woman, or even a holiday. The image in which I plan to discuss in is that of a guardian. Musician Sarah Mclachlan recently released a new hit song entitled, angel. This song represents individuals who have a sense of loneliness and suffer from various types of depression. Whether regarding a job, schoolwork, parenting, etc., I believe that anyone, in some shape or form, can relate to this song personally. In order to provide a thorough rhetorical criticism, I find it necessary to perform Kenneth Burke's dramatistic pentad. Burke states, "the job ...
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  • Antigone - 507 words
    Antigone Antigone This poem is quite successful in getting the plot across to the reader. Unfortunatly, that is all he can get across because of his beleif that, "inside every fat book is a skinny book trying to get out." Sargoff cannot have character descriptions, themes, or any real detail in his "skinny book" because of his beleifs. Sargoff leaves off why Polynices should not be burried and why his brother, who is not even menchoned, can be burried. This is important to building the feelings of contempt towards Creon and an understanding of what Antigone is doing. Also, because this is a "Humorous Distillation," the tone of the play is lost. Instead of being a dramatic play about obeying ...
    Related: antigone, point of view, tragic hero, greek tragedy, mend
  • Antigone - 890 words
    Antigone In Ancient Greece, new ideals surfaced as answers to lifes complicated questions. These new beliefs were centered on the expanding field of science. Man was focused on more than the Gods or heavenly concerns. A government that was ruled by the people was suggested as opposed to a monarchy that had existed for many years. Freedom of religion was encouraged to be exercised in city-states. These new ideals, though good in intentions, often conflicted with each other creating complex moral dilemmas. Such was the case in Antigone a play written by Sophocles during this era of change. In the play, Antigone and Creon battle a philosophical war dealing with the controversy of the Greek idea ...
    Related: antigone, freedom of religion, city states, ancient greece, haemon
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