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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: cholera

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  • Cholera - 595 words
    Cholera Cholera is an infectious intestinal disease common in Southern Asia. Cholera is caused by a comma-shaped bacterium called Vibrio Choleras. The microorganism is transmitted by water or food that has been contaminated with the feces of people who have the disease. Cholera occurs when Vibrio Cholera enters the intestines and releases Cholera toxin. The toxin causes the intestine to secrete large amounts of water and salt. Because the intestine cannot absorb the water and salt at the rate they are secreted, the patient suffers severe diarrhea. This loss of fluid causes severe dehydration and changes in the body chemistry. If untreated, the illness can lead to shock and eventually death. ...
    Related: cholera, food products, west africa, western hemisphere, practically
  • Cholera The Forgotten Disease - 475 words
    Cholera The Forgotten Disease Cholera the Forgotten Disease It seems every time we hear of a major flood or earthquake in a developing country, we hear once again about cholera. Cholera has been very rare in industrial nations, such as the USA, for the last 100 years, however, what we do not realize is that cholera is endemic in many small countries which have limited drinking water and sewage treatment facilities. Caused by an infection of bacterium Vibrio Cholerae in the intestine, a cholera infection is often mild or without symptoms, but sometimes is severe. Symptoms appear 2 to 3 days after initial exposure. Approximately one in 20 infected persons display symptoms of water diarrhea, vo ...
    Related: cholera, forgotten, developing country, drinking water, immunity
  • Angola - 735 words
    Angola Geography Angola is located in southern Africa, boarding the South Atlantic Ocean and is between Namibia and Democratic republic of the Congo. The area is 1,246,700sq km. For size comparative Angola is less than twice the size of Texas. For the geographic coordinates they are 12 30 s 18 30 E. The coastline is 1,600km long. The highest point in elevation is Morro de Moco witch is 2,620 miles high. The population of Angola is 11,177,537. The Capital and its largest city is Luanda witch has 2,000,000 people. Some other large and main cities are Huambo that has 400,000 people and one more main city is Lubango, 105,000. The birth rate is 43.1/1000; infant mortality rate is 129.2/1000; dens ...
    Related: angola, civil war, south atlantic, water pollution, railroads
  • Bacteria Are Often Maligned As The Causes Of Human And Animal Disease Like This One, Leptospira, Which Causes Serious Disease - 793 words
    Bacteria are often maligned as the causes of human and animal disease (like this one, Leptospira, which causes serious disease in livestock). However, certain bacteria, the actinomycetes, produce antibiotics such as streptomycin and nocardicin; others live symbiotically in the guts of animals (including humans) or elsewhere in their bodies, or on the roots of certain plants, converting nitrogen into a usable form. Bacteria put the tang in yogurt and the sour in sourdough bread; bacteria help to break down dead organic matter; bacteria make up the base of the food web in many environments. Bacteria are of such immense importance because of their extreme flexibility, capacity for rapid growth ...
    Related: bacteria, food poisoning, carbon dioxide, organisms, streptococcus
  • Bacteria Outline - 1,338 words
    Bacteria Outline Bacteria - Oldest, structurally simplest, most abundant forms of life - Only organism with prokaryotic cellular organization - The only members of the kingdom Monera (4800 different kinds) - Characteristics change depending on growth conditions - Maintenance of life depends on them - play vital role of productivity and as decomposers - Capable of fixing atmospheric N for use by other organisms - Used in production and fermentation of various food and as antibiotics and is being tested for insect control - Prokaryotes vs. Eukaryotes - Multi-cellularity - All bacteria fundamentally single celled - Sometimes cells adhere within a matrix to form filaments - Activities of bacteri ...
    Related: bacteria, outline, food poisoning, flowering plants, acid
  • Bram Stoker Report - 1,073 words
    Bram Stoker Report Bram Stoker was born in Dublin, Ireland on November 8th, 1847. His father was a civil servant in Dublin Castle, and his mother, Charlotte, was a women's lib advocate. They had seven children in nine years; the third of which was Bram. The first seven years of his life he was bedridden with an undiagnosed disease which may have been anything from rheumatic fever, asthma or a form of nonparalytic polio. During these first years of his life as he laid in his bed he listened to stories his mother told him of the cholera epidemic of 1832; people buried alive, and entire families dying in a matter of days. At the age of 12 Bram left his home to attend school at Dublin's Rutland ...
    Related: bram, bram stoker, stoker, merchant of venice, masters degree
  • California Golden Rush - 1,350 words
    California Golden Rush Shortly after the acquisition of California from Mexico a man by the name of John Sutter arrived in East San Francisco Bay in 1839. Born in Germany he had to leave because he was unable to pay his creditors. With plenty of charm and letters from friends he convinced the Mexican governor of California to award him a land grant of more than 50,000 acres. John Sutter built a stockade and a fort and soon after became referred to as Captain Sutter, and his riverbank establishment Sutters Fort. Sutter chose a location on the south fork of the American River, 50 miles to the south of his fort, to build a sawmill. (Pic. 1) A millrace was dug and wooden gates were opened period ...
    Related: california, gold rush, golden, rush, american history
  • Culture And Music Of The 70s - 1,240 words
    Culture And Music Of The 70'S Term Paper Music is an outlet to all aspects of life and culture is a significant way of forming people and the way they live. Although not always seen directly culture has an overbearing influence on the music that is produced and made popular. The political Climate of the early seventies was full of fire with issues such as Vietnam and constant protest throughout the county. Later in the 70's the end of the Vietnamese conflict brought the rise of the Watergate scandal and Iran Contra. These issues swept headlines and ingrained people's thoughts. Social issues also played a big role in the developing culture of the seventies. Protests and constant outbreaks abo ...
    Related: music, music industry, popular music, rock music, american history
  • During The Victorian Era - 1,688 words
    During The Victorian Era Characteristics During the Victorian Era When imagining the Victorian Age, royalty, fancy lifestyles, and elaborate living often come to mind. However, during this same era, other lifestyles and conditions of a completely different nature were occurring. Many of the English people lived in poverty. Charles Dickens, one of the great writers of this period, described how it was to live during the Victorian Era. Although England grew from an agricultural to an industrial society, not all citizens benefited from this change. In addition, the undesirable health and medical environment plagued both the wealthy and the poor. Charles Dickens was a profound British writer who ...
    Related: victorian, victorian england, industrial society, ebenezer scrooge, bacteria
  • Ecology And Plague - 528 words
    Ecology And Plague Ecology is a branch of science concerned with the interrelationships of organisms and their environment. An ecosystem is a community, together with its nonliving factors existing together. Scientifically, a community consists of a collection of creatures that live in a particular place together. The Coming Plague was a novel that outlined how each epidemic has been a direct result of each step of human progression. The diseases covered in laymans terms were Machupo, Marburg, Yellow Fever, Meningitis, Lassa Fever, Ebola, Swine, Flu, Legionaires Disease, HIV/AIDS, Toxic Shock Syndrome, Hantavirus, Malaria, Seal Plague, Tuberculosis and Cholera. Humans have not been exempt fr ...
    Related: ecology, plague, yellow fever, cretaceous period, intense
  • Environmental Effects Of Global Warming - 1,713 words
    Environmental Effects Of Global Warming Environmental Effects of Global Warming The greenhouse effect and global warming are issues that are talked about by geologists all the time. The greenhouse effect is a natural process that keeps the earth at temperatures that are livable. Energy from the sun warms the earth when its heat rays are absorbed by greenhouse gasses and become trapped in the atmosphere. Some of the most common greenhouse gasses are water vapor, carbon dioxide, and methane. If there were no greenhouse gasses, very few rays would be absorbed and the earth would be extremely cold. When too many rays are absorbed, the earth's atmosphere starts to warm, which leads to global warm ...
    Related: environmental, environmental effects, global warming, greenhouse effect, stop global, warming
  • Freshwater Resources: Tapped Out By Peter Gleick - 1,173 words
    Freshwater Resources: Tapped Out By Peter Gleick The article being discussed was entitled Tapped Out and was written by Peter Gleick. It focuses on the depleting supply of our Earth's freshwater resources. How it effects the human population, and how the problem will develop in years to come. The question being asked is will we be able to sustain enough freshwater to satisfy all the world's needs? And what will we do about the present lack of clean freshwater in many underdeveloped countries all around the world. The reason why is quite obvious. We need to reevaluate our distribution of freshwater, and find a way to conserve and preserve it for generations to come. An astounding half of the ...
    Related: freshwater, peter, latin america, drinking water, solve
  • History - 772 words
    History And Cultures By Thomas Sowell "History and Cultures" by Thomas Sowell surveys many different cultures and explains why cultures have differences in productivity, income, wealth, education, occupation and industry. A reason for these differences is due primary to geography, rather than to the individual or ethnic group. History has proven that because of geography that no one society has developed equally and that the size of a person's cultural world will influence how far a person or an ethnic group can develop, technologically and culturally. Immigrants can thrive almost everywhere because they must. As outsiders immigrants tend to work harder than natives, starting with most menia ...
    Related: history, american population, preferential treatment, different cultures, culturally
  • History Of Middle America - 1,469 words
    ... d assembly from all of the provinces gathered in Guatemala and declared its independence from Spain under the name United Provinces of Central America. In 1824 it adopted the Constitution of the Federal Republic of Central America, a document similar to the Spanish Constitution of 1812, providing for a federation of Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica. Chiapas decided to stay with Mexico, and Panama had become part of the Republic of Columbia in 1821. In 1824 the constitution provided a single-house legislature and reserved considerable autonomy to the states, yet it offered an adequate framework for a union. Different provincial ideologies began to show themselve ...
    Related: america, central america, history, middle america, less developed countries
  • Human Disease Research - 2,297 words
    Human Disease Research Human Disease IINTRODUCTION Human Disease, in medicine, any harmful change that interferes with the normal appearance, structure, or function of the body or any of its parts. Since time immemorial, disease has played a role in the history of societies. It has affected-and been affected by-economic conditions, wars, and natural disasters. Indeed, the impact of disease can be far greater than better-known calamities. An epidemic of influenza that swept the globe in 1918 killed between 20 million and 40 million people. Within a few months, more than 500,000 Americans died-more than were killed during World War I (1914-1918), World War II (1939-1945), the Korean War (1950- ...
    Related: alzheimer's disease, disease research, heart disease, human disease, huntington's disease, infectious disease, liver disease
  • Immigration - 1,103 words
    Immigration The Canadian Immigration Policy and the Racial Discrimination it Induced The laissez faire approach to immigration that Canada had inherited over its lifetime began to fade away in 1884. British Columbia had become very concerned with the number of single male Chinese that had emigrated to the province since the 1860's when the American gold fields dried up. Thus, the provincial government took political action over the next year to finally impose a head tax of $50, on each Chinese immigrant who flocked to the region. In addition, Clifford Sifton, a struggling young lawyer from Winnipeg and the youngest member of the Cabinet of Sir Wilfrid Laurier, was obsessed by a dream of prom ...
    Related: immigration, immigration policy, canadian history, laissez faire, peril
  • Ireland - 1,355 words
    Ireland The Great Starvation of Ireland I. The starvation in Ireland: 1845-1852 Over the years, the people of Ireland have suffered many hardships, but none compare to the devastation brought by the Irish potato famine of 1845-1857. A poorly managed nation together with ideally wicked weather conditions brought Ireland to the brink of disaster. It was a combination of social, political and economic factors that pushed it over the edge. After a long wet summer, the potato blight first appeared in Wexford and Waterford in September of 1845. The phytophora infestans were carried in on ships from Europe and America. Less than a year later, in August of 1846, virtually the entire potato crop in I ...
    Related: ireland, british government, economic system, british army, target
  • Life Of Peter Tchaikovsky - 1,245 words
    ... tended to regard Tchaikovsky-the glibness of whose poor moments indeed give them some excuse-as a featureless eclectic. Some of them, notably Cui, were scarcely civil in the things they said of him. He, on the other hand, describes in his letter their merits as well as their defects with surprising freedom from bias. For example: The young Petersburg composers are very gifted, but impregnated with the most horrible presumptuousness and a purely amateur conviction of their superiority. Rimsky-Korsakoff (Korsakov) is the only one among them who discovered. . . . that their doctrines had no sound basis, that their denial of authority and of the masterpieces was nothing but ignorance. . . . ...
    Related: peter, tchaikovsky, piano concerto, good luck, ignorance
  • Medical Ethics - 1,445 words
    ... conditions or not, but that is the problem with written guidelines, they work on paper, but not necessarily in life (Levine 173). Must we experiment on human beings? If so, what human experiment categories are ethically correct? Human experimentation falls into three divisions, the first of which is, ? Experiments that the researcher carries out on him or herself ? (Weiss 34). A traditionally excepted example of this was conducted over one-hundred years ago by a scientist set on disproving the fact germs cause disease, The way he decided to prove his idea was to swallow a beakerful of cholera germs. However, he had a natural immunity to cholera; he did not become ill. It was concluded t ...
    Related: ethics, medical ethics, medical profession, medical science, medical technology
  • Moving Through Change - 534 words
    Moving Through Change Brandon Spelling May 12, 2000 Essay for Exam III Moving Through Change Common people have been through many changes in history such as technological change, economic change, and political change. Common people define history as a period of change. Technology will always change history for the common people as time goes on. Technological advancements in medicine have contributed to change. Many diseases such as smallpox, measles, cholera, plague and influenza were fatal. The changes in technology have made these fatal diseases disappear. For example, the invention of penicillin and a better understanding of microbiology have advanced Western medicine and public health th ...
    Related: economic change, political change, technological change, united states civil, first century
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