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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: chile

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  • Chile - 350 words
    Chile The first European to visit what is now Chile was the Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan, who landed at Chilo Island following his voyage, in 1520, through the strait that now bears his name. The region was then known to its native population as Tchili, a Native American word meaning "snow." At the same time of Magellan's visit, most of Chile south of the Rapel River was dominated by the Araucanians, a Native American tribe remarkable for its fighting ability. The tribes occupying the northern portions of Chile had been subjugated during the 15th century by the Incas of Peru. In 1535, after the Spanish under Francisco Pizarro had completed their conquest of Peru, Diego de Almagro, ...
    Related: chile, urban population, pablo neruda, native american, portuguese
  • Chile Political Parties And Organizations - 1,471 words
    Chile Political Parties And Organizations Taking a look at Chile's government and institutions it gives the idea that the average person is represented. Chilean people have a history of strong political ties and many private associations and organizations. This has been helpful in taking care that many interests and needs are expressed within the government. Perhaps even more helpful is the development of many different political parties, whom, for the most part represent many of these organizations and associations in the government. In order to evaluate these institutions a closer look must be taken at each to understand fully the amount of organization that is in place. In the 1990's Chil ...
    Related: chile, organizations, political parties, political spectrum, collapse of the soviet union
  • Chile Political Parties And Organizations - 1,401 words
    ... ition parties to propose far-reaching amendments to the constitution. The National Renewal party, however, could not impose its own party president, having to concede the presidential candidacy of the right to the UDI's Bchi. After the 1989 congressional race, the National Renewal party emerged as the dominant party of the right, benefiting strongly from the electoral law and electing six senators and twenty-nine deputies. Its strength in the Senate meant that the Aylwin government had to compromise with the National Renewal party to gain support for key legislative and constitutional measures. The National Renewal party saw much of its support wane in the wake of party scandals involvin ...
    Related: business organization, chile, organizations, political issues, political parties
  • A Reaction To Clive Pontings A Green History Of The World - 1,810 words
    A Reaction To Clive PontingS A Green History Of The World A Green History of the World has been very educational reading and has given me a new prospective on the environment. While I do disagree with some of Clive Pointings views I have learned a lot from his work. A Green History of the World was a very in-depth look at the past and the future of our environment. Pointing raised my consciousness regarding the trials we face as inhabitants of this great planet and left me with some food for thought. After reading Chapter One I found myself entranced by the mystery of Easter Island and excited about the information A Green History of the World had to offer. I had virtually no understanding o ...
    Related: clive, history, third world, third world countries, world countries
  • Alcoholism - 2,059 words
    Alcoholism alcoholism Definitions and causal factors of alcoholism Alcoholism consists of a repetitive intake of alcoholic beverages to an extent that the drinker is harmed. The harm may be physical or mental; it may also be social or economic. Implicit in the conception of alcoholism as a disease is the idea that the person experiencing repeated or long-lasting injury from his drinking would alter his behaviour if he could. His failure to do so shows that he cannot help himself, that he has lost control over drinking. This conception incorporates the idea of addiction or dependence. Formal definitions of alcoholism vary according to the point of view of the definer. A simplistic, old-fashio ...
    Related: alcoholism, affective disorder, social factors, world war ii, relation
  • Antidumping - 1,990 words
    ... increase in price. Griswold in his article "Industry Sets Steel Trap for US Economy" feels that domestic car buyers would be hurt by this increase in steel prices. Also, he believes that an increase in steel prices would make it tougher for huge industries such as General Motors and Caterpillar to compete in world markets. Plus, as the graph indicates, the US as whole incurs a net loss of b and d. This loss may or may not be made up with the net gain of e, the terms of trade gain. While tariffs might benefit the steel industry, they hurt steel consuming industries. They may or may not hurt the US in general. Although most developing countries believe that antidumping can be legitimate i ...
    Related: developed countries, international trade, steel industry, subsidy, sabotage
  • Antidumping And The Wto - 1,965 words
    ... uction industries, and the food packaging industries are all other large industries that consume a fair amount of steel. Thus, they would suffer from the increase in price. Griswold in his article Industry Sets Steel Trap for US Economy feels that domestic car buyers would be hurt by this increase in steel prices. Also, he believes that an increase in steel prices would make it tougher for huge industries such as General Motors and Caterpillar to compete in world markets. Plus, as the graph indicates, the US as whole incurs a net loss of b and d. This loss may or may not be made up with the net gain of e, the terms of trade gain. While tariffs might benefit the steel industry, they hurt ...
    Related: economic growth, policy studies, global trade, injurious, competitive
  • Aquaculture - 1,393 words
    Aquaculture Aquaculture is the farming of aquatic organisms in fresh, or salt water. A wide variety of aquatic organisms are produced through aquaculture, including fish, crustaceans, mollusks, algae, and aquatic plants. Unlike capture fisheries, aquaculture requires deliberate human intervention in the organisms' productivity and results in yields that exceed those from the natural environment alone. Stocking water with (juvenile organisms), fertilizing the water, feeding the organisms, and maintaining water quality are common examples of such intervention. Most aquacultural crops are destined for human consumption. However, aquaculture also produces bait fishes, ornamental or aquarium fish ...
    Related: aquaculture, thermal energy, natural environment, atlantic coast, concrete
  • Argentinas Economy - 1,095 words
    Argentina`s Economy Argentina lives in a democracy since 1986. Before this year lived it under a military regime. In the nineties under the presidency of Menem the country experienced a great increase in the liberalization of trade. Argentina has a free market economic system. Due to the recent privatization program, the State now has a very limited role in the economy. According to the Competitiveness Report of the World Economic Forum Argentina is classified as one of the most open, least protectionist countries in the world. Its currency is convertible to the US dollars and there is total freedom for moving capital internationally. Argentina has conducted one of the most intensive privati ...
    Related: economy, united kingdom, south america, world bank, telephone
  • Argentinas Economy - 1,071 words
    ... Mercosurs GDP; Brazil share exceeds 70 percent. Each country in the Mercosur has preferential agreements with each other. The average trade-weighted external tariff is 17 percent. 85 percent of goods are included in Mercosurs common external tariff, with the balance to be phased into he common external tariff by 2006. Mercosur members countries expect to implement a common auto policy by 2000, which is to replace the current quota and tariff system. Argentinas trade with its other neighbor countries is not as significant as the trade it has with Brazil. Nevertheless, Trade between Argentina and Bolivia (56.4 percent), Peru (20 percent), Uruguay (12.8 percent), and Chile (8.3 percent) has ...
    Related: economy, foreign direct, duty free, intelligence unit, urge
  • Arsenic - 1,849 words
    ... arsenic and toxicology are interested in the pending crisis in India because of the wealth of information to be gained. It would be possible to discover what diseases arsenic causes and the information learned could help countries such as Taiwan, Chile, and Mongolia, where there are large problems with arsenic contamination. (Bagla and Kaiser 1996) Response from the Indian government to the crisis is low. They had approved a project that costs $25 million in 1995 that would supply piped water to the Malda district, but there has been scant improvement. In fact, the problem has grown more widespread. Tube wells that were not previously contaminated are now tainted and the federal governme ...
    Related: arsenic, protection agency, problems caused, indian government, stomach
  • Astronomers - 1,780 words
    Astronomers Part One Brief Descriptions of the Following Astronomers: Walter Baade : Baade was a German-born American, whose work gave new estimates for the age and size of the universe. During the wartime, blackouts aided his observatons and allowed him to indentify and classify stars in a new and useful way, and led him to increase and improve Hubble's values for the size and age of the universe (to the great relief of geologists.) He also worked on supernovae and radiostars. Milton Humason : Humason was a colleague of Edwin Hubble's at Mt. Wilson and Palomar Mtn. who was instrumental in measuring faint galaxy spectra providing evidence for the expansion of the universe. Jan Oort : In 1927 ...
    Related: catholic church, isaac newton, solar system, holland, medieval
  • Australia And Apec - 1,202 words
    Australia And Apec Economics assignment: APEC When the Asian-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) was established in 1989 in response to the growing interdependence among Asia-Pacific economies, its goal was to advance Asia-Pacific economic dynamism and sense of community. When the cooperation was established, there were 12 founding member economies, namely Australia, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Indonesia, Japan, Republic of Korea, Malaysia, New Zealand, Republic of the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and the United States. Since then there has been more countries/economies joining APEC. APEC has come a long way since 1989. It has built steadily on the efforts of the past and looks forward to ...
    Related: apec, australia, national product, economic growth, taipei
  • Block Buster - 1,028 words
    Block Buster BLOCKBUSTER ENTERTAINMENT David P. Cook created the first Blockbuster Video store in October 1985 in Dallas, Texas. Mr. Cook intended to establish video superstores that would respond to the on going trends in the video industry during the 1980's because the number or households buying VCRs was increasing very much and so was the number of film titles. He wanted to create a store that would respond to the customer's needs such as: nice facilities, wide selections of videos, fast service, and convenience. A computer system was developed so that the company was able to track specific demographic data, customer's renting patterns, and the number of times a cassette has been rented, ...
    Related: block, block buster, buster, business world, executive officer
  • Brazilian Economy - 1,016 words
    ... mption, although this will lag behind the other drivers of growth. Industrial production grew in February for the fifth time in seven months, the first time Brazil has posted such a broad expansion since late 1997 (LaitnFocus) Public debt growth accelerated after mid-1995 due to the need to stabilize short-term capital inflows drawn by high domestic interest rates. This policy together with the need to extend central bank credit to the financial sector to help troubled banks has also led to a growing quasi-fiscal deficit. The Real's value has held well below its weakest point early in 1999 (around R2: $1), ending 1999 at R1.79: $1. Although debt repayments are forecast to be higher in th ...
    Related: brazilian, brazilian economy, economy, open economy, world economy
  • Causes Of Poverty In The Developing World - 707 words
    Causes Of Poverty In The Developing World The causes of poverty in the developing world Wars Many LDC's have been badly affected by wars. There have been many civil wars in Africa, caused by European empire-building in the nineteenth century. Several African races were joined into one country, but half a race was left in another country. These countries were still artificial countries after they achieved independence. One race was often badly treated by the ruling race, which resulted in civil war. This also happened in Europe since the various parts of Yugoslavia were given independence. LDC's also suffer from wars between different countries, such as: Ethiopia and Somalia, Afghanistan and ...
    Related: developed world, developing world, modern world, poverty, second world, world leaders, world market
  • Central America - 1,356 words
    Central America Central America, just south of Mexico and North of Panama, consists of just six countries; Guatemala, Belize, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica. Of those six, all share a distinct common history except for Belize. Belize for one is incredibly small, and while Spanish is the official language of other Central American countries, in Belize English is spoken. So throughout this paper as I carelessly say 'Central American' I am not including Belize whose history and development was far different than the others. Although Central America is located close to the United States in relation to the Eastern Hemisphere, our ways of life are indescribably different. When we ...
    Related: america, central america, central american, latin america, labor unions
  • Charles Darwin - 1,851 words
    Charles Darwin Charles Robert Darwin was a man of many hats. He was a friend, colleague, son, father, husband; but above all, he was a naturalist. Through his dedication and perseverance did he manage to, in less than a generation, establish the theory of evolution as a fact in peoples' minds. In fact, [t]oday it is almost impossible for us to return, even momentarily, to the pre-Darwinian atmosphere and attitude (West 323). Darwin formed the basis of his theory during the voyage of the H.M.S. Beagle, on which vessel he was posted as it travelled around the globe. During that five-year span, this young man saw foliage, creatures, cultures that he had never known first-hand before. He was exp ...
    Related: charles darwin, charles robert darwin, darwin, robert darwin, animal science
  • Charles Darwin - 1,133 words
    Charles Darwin Charles Robert Darwin was the fifth child of Robert Waring Darwin and Susannah Wedgewood. He was born on February 12, 1809 in Shrewsbury, England where his father practiced medicine. He attended Shrewsbury Grammar School which was a well-kn own secondary school which concentrated on teaching classic languages. Even as a boy Darwin loved science and his enthusiasm for chemical studies earned him the name "Gas" from his friends. The headmaster at Shrewsbury, Dr. Samuel Butler noted, "Here's a boy, plays around with his gases and the rest of his rubbish and works at nothing useful." He was also an avid collector. Anything he could get his hands on- shells, eggs, minerals and coin ...
    Related: charles darwin, charles robert darwin, darwin, robert darwin, natural selection
  • Charles Darwin - 372 words
    Charles Darwin Darwin was born in Shrewsbury, Shropshire. He was the son of Robert Waring Darwin and his wife Susannah; and the grandson of the scientist Erasmus Darwin, and of the potter Josiah Wedgwood. His mother died when he was eight years old, and he was brought up by his sister. He was taught classics at Shrewsbury, then sent to Edinburgh to study medicine, which he hated, and a final attempt at educating him was made by sending him to Christ's College, Cambridge, to study theology (1827). During that period he loved to collect plants, insects, and geological specimens, guided by his cousin William Darwin Fox, an entomologist. His scientific inclinations were encouraged by his botany ...
    Related: charles darwin, charles lyell, darwin, erasmus darwin, coral reefs
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