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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: african art

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  • African Art - 419 words
    African Art The traditional art of Africa plays a major part in the African society. Most ceremonies and activities (such as singing, dancing, storytelling, ect.) can not function without visual art. It can also be used as an implement and insignia of rank or prestige, or have a religious significance.African art consists mainly of sculptures, paintings, fetishes, masks, figures, and decorative objects. Sculptures are considered to be the greatest achievement for African art. A majority of the sculptures are done in wood but are also made of metal, stone, terra-cotta, mud, beadwork, ivory, and other materials. It is found in many parts of Africa but mainly in western and central Africa. Many ...
    Related: african, african art, african culture, musical instruments, central africa
  • Aaron Douglas - 1,128 words
    Aaron Douglas People may ask, what other than a tornado can come out of Kansas? Well, Aaron Douglas was born of May 26, 1899 in Topeka, Kansas. Aaron Douglas was a "Pioneering Africanist" artist who led the way in using African- oriented imagery in visual art during the Harlem Renaissance of 1919- 1929. His work has been credited as the catalyst for the genre incorporating themes in form and style that affirm the validity of the black consciousness and experience in America. His parents were Aaron and Elizabeth Douglas. In 1922, he graduated from the University of Nebraska School of Fine Arts in Lincoln. Who thought that this man would rise to meet W.E.B. Du Bois's 1921 challenge, calling fo ...
    Related: aaron, douglas, negro history, american experience, breath
  • African American Culture - 957 words
    African American Culture African American Culture Culture is not a fixed phenomenon, nor is it the same in all places or to all people. It is relative to time, place, and particular people. Learning about other people can help us to understand ourselves and to be better world citizens. One of the most common ways of studying culture is to focus on the differences within and among cultures. Although their specifics may vary form one culture to another, sociologists refer to those elements or characteristics that can be found in every know society as cultural universals. For example, in all societies, funeral rites include expression of grief, disposing of the dead, and rituals that define the ...
    Related: african, african american, african american culture, african art, american, american community, american culture
  • African Museum - 1,576 words
    African Museum Wesam Berjaoui April. 01, 2000 Professor Gloster-Coates History 132 CRN# 24386 Museum Project The first museum I went to was my favorite. I went to the Museum for African Art displaying the Hair exhibit. The name of the exhibit sounded very uninteresting, but I was proven wrong. The first thing that I learned from this exhibit is that in Africa the way your hair is done represents your position in society. Your hair was probably one of the most important if not thee most important thing to an African person. A person was distinguished into which clan or group he or she was in by his or her hair style. If you were a very wealthy person your hair was extremely well done to make ...
    Related: african, african art, african people, metropolitan museum, museum
  • Art Of Portraiture - 843 words
    Art Of Portraiture The three works that I chose that are art of portraiture are Head of a King, Mask of an Lyoba, and Mother Goddess. The first two portraits are West African Art from two different tribes, Ife, who created the Head of a King and Benin, whom created the Mask of an Lyoba. The Mother Goddess is an Aztec piece. These groups of people are from different cultures, time periods, and share different religious beliefs. The similarity of the groups is the symbolic meaning the portraitures brought to its people. The first work is the Head of a King. This Ife creation altered the perception that scholars had of the tribe. It was known that the Ife tribes did not do portraits because of ...
    Related: portraiture, aztec empire, mother goddess, different cultures, drew
  • Cubism - 1,295 words
    Cubism Cubism is one of the first forms of abstract art. Cubism was a movement in painting that sought to break down objects into basic shapes of cubes, spheres, cylinders, and cones. Cubism originated in France and was influenced by African sculptures and by Paul Cezanne. The first cubist works were those in which objects, landscapes, and people are represented as many-sided solids. This enables you to see various views of the object at the same time. Later, cubism changed using a flatter type of abstraction, in which the complete pattern, becomes more important, and the objects represented are largely indecipherable. At first, most artists painted with little color. Most paintings were eit ...
    Related: cubism, modern technology, more important, modern times, cezanne
  • Ernie Barnes: Research Of The Football Artist - 1,739 words
    Ernie Barnes: Research Of The Football Artist Ernie Barnes was and still is one of the most popular and well-respected black artists today. Born and raised in Durham, North Carolina, in 1938, during the time the south as segregated, Ernie Barnes was not expected to become a famous artist. However, as a young boy, Barnes would, "often [accompany] his mother to the home of the prominent attorney, Frank Fuller, Jr., where she worked as a [housekeeper]" (Artist Vitae, The Company of Art, 1999). Fuller was able to spark Barnes' interest in art when he was only seven years old. Fuller told him about the various schools of art, his favorite painters, and the museums he visited (Barnes, 1995, p. 7). ...
    Related: american football, artist, college football, ernie, famous artist, football, football league
  • Expressionism Is A Much Less Important Current In Sculpture Than In Painting, Since The Ethnographic Sculpture By The Fauves - 1,580 words
    Expressionism is a much less important current in sculpture than in painting, since the ethnographic sculpture by the Fauves might have evoked a strong response among sculptors Only one important sculptor shared in this rediscovery Brancusi, a Rumanian, moved to Paris to study advanced art around 1904 But he was more interested in the formal simplicity and coherence of primitive carvings than in their savage expressiveness; this is evidenced in The Kiss which was executed in 1909 Brancusi had a 'genius of ommission' - to Brancusi a monument is an upright slab, symmetrical and immobile - a permanent marker like the styles of the ancients and he disturbed the basic shape as little as possible ...
    Related: ethnographic, expressionism, modern sculpture, sculpture, african culture
  • Faith Ringolds Biography - 417 words
    Faith Ringold`S Biography FAITH RINGOLD`S BIOGRAPHY Who was Faith Ringold ? Born in New York , Faith Ringold was an African American artist who started school in 2nd grade . While she was at home , her mother taught her the basic skills . She knew how to read before she went to school . In her early childhood she use to be sick every so often , she could not attend school regularly ; however, her mother use to bring her drawing books and pencils . Therefore , she spent most of her time drawing . So, as she grew older and began to go to school , one day her teacher asked her to draw a mountain. Because she was born and raised in New York, she had never seen a mountain before; therefore, she c ...
    Related: biography, african american, harriet tubman, american art, tubman
  • How Art Improves Our Lives - 822 words
    How Art Improves Our Lives Art is a deliberate recreation of a new and special reality that grows from one's response to life. It improves our existence by enhancing, changing and perpetuating our cultural composition. "The great artist knows how to impose their particular illusion on the rest of mankind," proclaimed Guy de Mauspassant. Art improves our lives by directly and indirectly lift the morale of individuals, creating unity and social solidarity. Art creates awareness of social issues. Art may express and reflect the religious, political, and economical aspects of cultures. Art is and can be what ever a culture says it is or what ever they want it to be. It involves all people, those ...
    Related: human life, art history, great artists, acceptable, illusion
  • Les Demoiselles De Avignon - 1,418 words
    ... as very aware that people look at objects and capture the image in their minds from many different perspectives. The object?s important qualities then melt together in a single memory. Many visual perspectives become one perspective of the mind. Cezanne influenced Picasso heavily in this sort of thought. Cezanne once said ?I think of art as personal apperception. I place this perception in sensation , and I require that the intelligence organize it into a work or art.?10 Cezanne is speaking of perceiving an object or scene in ones mind , then using your memories and logic to paint what you saw. Unfortunately Cezanne knew that he had not achieved what he preached , although he did recogni ...
    Related: avignon, demoiselles, random house, different cultures, perceive
  • Pablo Picasso And His Artistic Life - 1,403 words
    ... 1973. Bibliography Pablo picasso And his Artistic Life A report by terra hardman Introduction Pablo Picasso was a Spanish painter and sculptor, generally considered the greatest artist of the 20th century. He was unique as an inventor of forms, as an innovator of styles and techniques, as a master of various media, and as one of the most prolific artists in history. He created more than 20,000 works. Picasso's genius manifested itself early: at the age of 10 he made his first paintings, and at 15 he performed brilliantly on the entrance examinations to Barcelona's School of Fine Arts. Family life Born in Mlaga on October 25, 1881, Picasso was the son of Jos Ruiz Blasco, an art teacher, a ...
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  • The Art Of Influence - 1,038 words
    The Art Of Influence THE ART OF INFLUENCE; Africa And Its' Influence On Western Art Between The Mid-Nineteenth Century and The First World War During the mid 19th century up until the Great War of 1914, European countries began to heavily colonize and come into contact with African nations. This was called "new imperialism". During this contact, European culture was influenced by Africa. The influence of the African people can be seen in the European society of the time. In the 19th and 20th centuries, modern artists embraced African art for its lack of pretension or formal qualities. In the latter part of the 19th century, the "scramble for Africa," consolidated at the Berlin Conference, di ...
    Related: first world, rain forest, african people, visiting, arranged
  • The Art Of Influence - 1,035 words
    ... , this composition is done in the celebrated cubist structure. Picasso's portrait of Gertrude Stein includes mask like treatment of her face, which was influenced by African artists. Other Picasso paintings indicating African influence include, Seated Nude done in 1907, Nude Figure of 1910, and Man with Mandolin completed in 1911. Head of a Woman, done in 1909, as well as Mandolin and Clarinet, 1913 illustrates Pablo Picasso's interest in the sculptural form of African sculptures. Picasso was not the only European artist to find inspiration from ethnic art. Another artist, whose work exemplifies African influence, is Paul Gauguin. After being drawn into Impressionism, Gauguin realized th ...
    Related: van gogh, german expressionism, paul gauguin, couch, comprehensive
  • The History Of The Smithsonian Institution And Its Founder, Has Truly Had An Impact On What The Elaborate, Extensive, And Com - 1,465 words
    ... reality. Ripley envisioned the Smithsonian as a 'society of scholars,' a 'university without classes.' In other words, he wanted to have vast buildings enclosed with shops, restaurants, and rest areas. He wanted events to entertain and educate the public. To reach these goals, he got another 50 scientists, developed an Office of Education and Training to make programs for students and young professionals. Ripley also extended the evening hours in the galleries and the museums. Luckily, Ripley's plans coincided with those of President Lyndon B. Johnson's plans of "Great Society" programs of the late 1960's. Johnson sought to improve the lives' of all Americans. So, on Ripley's first missi ...
    Related: african american history, american history, history, institution, natural history, smithsonian, smithsonian institution
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