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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: cherokee

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  • Apache And Cherokee Indians - 631 words
    Apache and Cherokee Indians Apache and Cherokee Indians The Apache Indians of North America prospered for years throughout Kansas, New Mexico, and Arizona. They were a religious society who believed in a "giver of life". As any complex society today, The Apache had many inter-tribal differences, although the tribe as a whole was able to see through these conflicts. Women and the extended family played an important role in the society and also in the lives of young children. Groups of different extended families, called bands, often lived together and functioned democratically. The Apache also evolved as the coming of the white man changed their lives. These Indians became adept at using hors ...
    Related: apache, cherokee, cherokee people, indian culture, written language
  • Cherokee Indian Tribe - 472 words
    Cherokee Indian Tribe The Cherokee Indians first lived in Tennessee. The name Indian first came from Christopher Columbus, who thought that America was part of the Indies, Asia. The first person to come across Indians was Hernando de Soto, in 1540. In wintertime the Indian men wore long sleeved shirts, loose fitting leggings, and moosehide moccasins. Women wore skin dresses tied at the waist and long, fitted leggings. Indians would hunt deer, elk, moose and buffalo. They would also eat rabbits, raccoons and birds. The women would sometimes make a stew with the meat. They also ate berries, nuts, fruit and beans and corn. Indian houses were made of stone, wood, skins, twigs and mud. There were ...
    Related: cherokee, cherokee indian, cherokee nation, indian, indian children, indian tribe, tribe
  • President Jackson And The Removal Of The Cherokee Indians - 1,390 words
    President Jackson and the Removal of the Cherokee Indians "The decision of the Jackson administration to remove the Cherokee Indians to lands west of the Mississippi River in the 1830's was more a reformulation of the national policy that had been in effect since the 1790's than a change in that policy." The dictum above is firm and can be easily proved by examining the administration of Jackson and comparison to the traditional course which was carried out for about 40 years. After 1825 the federal government attempted to remove all eastern Indians to the Great Plains area of the Far West. The Cherokee Indians of northwestern Georgia, to protect themselves from removal, made up a constituti ...
    Related: andrew jackson, cherokee, cherokee indian, cherokee nation, jackson, president jackson, removal
  • Slavery And Evolution Of Cherokee - 220 words
    Slavery And Evolution Of Cherokee In this well-written book by Theda Perdue, he discloses much of the history of slavery among the Cherokee people and their evolution during this 326 year period. He begins with their abduction by the Spanish. Perdue gives a remarkable comparison of the two very different views of slavery experienced by two very different cultures. He states that even though the Spaniards captured the Cherokee for use as slaves, they misunderstood that the Indians had an egalitarian social system. The Cherokee system also included distribution of power and labor. Thus, the Cherokee accepted their slavery as a natural part of domination by the strongest. The Cherokee misunders ...
    Related: cherokee, cherokee people, evolution, slavery, african people
  • The Cherokee Indians - 1,019 words
    The Cherokee Indians The Cherokee Indians were one of the four civilized tribes in the United States during colonial times. The Cherokee people were interested in the white men and their ways, and even using some of the new mens ways. The Cherokee played an important role in Colonial American history with help from Sequoyah and learning the ways of white men. The Cherokee were originally located in the southeast United States. This area included: the western sides of the Carolinas, the northern parts of Georgia and Alabama, southwest Virginia, and the Cumberland Basin. Around 1781 the Cherokee population was around 25,000. They had just lost around half of their population due to smallpox an ...
    Related: cherokee, cherokee people, important role, wild turkey, ripe
  • The Cherokee Indians - 1,013 words
    ... was the males against the females. The females did get to choose one male to be on their team(Brown 35-6). The Cherokee were divided into seven clans half of which were peace and the other half were war. The different clans did not all live together(Microsoft). The Green Corn Ceremony was the most important ceremony. It did not have a certain date because it occurred when the corn became ripe. This ceremony marked the end of the old year and the beginning of a new year for the Cherokees(Mails 196). The ceremony was the time of thanksgiving and spiritual renewal(Microsoft). Any mysterious diseases were blamed on a human or animal spirits caused by a witch. Priest tried to heal the disease ...
    Related: cherokee, cherokee people, indian removal, indian removal act, indian territory
  • The Trail Of Tears, Was It Unjust And Inhumane What Happened To The Cherokee During That Long And Treacherous Journey They We - 957 words
    The Trail of Tears, was it unjust and inhumane? What happened to the Cherokee during that long and treacherous journey? They were brave and listened to the government, but they recieved unproductive land and lost their tribal land. The white settlers were already emigrating to the Union, or America. The East coast was burdened with new settlers and becoming vastly populated. President Andrew Jackson and the government had to find a way to move people to the West to make room. President Andrew Jackson passed the Indian Removal Policy in the year 1830. The Indian Removal Policy which called for the removal of Native Americans from the Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia area ...
    Related: cherokee, cherokee nation, trail, trail of tears, unjust
  • 5 Most Influential People In American History - 1,556 words
    5 Most Influential People In American History The United Sates has had a short yet complex history in its two hundred and twenty-four years. She has produced millions and millions of great individuals. These great minds have shaped what America is today. Others, however, have personally molded this magnificent nation with their own acts. John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, John Marshall, Henry Clay and Andrew Jackson are the most influential builders of the United States of America. John Adams was born loyal to the English Crown but evolved into the second President of the Free World. As a lawyer, Adams emerged into politics as an opponent of the Stamp Act and was a leader in the Revolutionary gro ...
    Related: american, american congress, american history, american revolution, american system, history, influential
  • Abstract On Rose Diseases - 2,160 words
    abstract on Rose diseases title = abstract on Rose diseases Disease Control Multi-Purpose Fungicide Daconil 2787 Plant Disease Control This product is widely used for broad spectrum disease control on lawns, ornamentals and listed fruits and vegetables. Controls many foliar diseases such as: rust, black spot, leaf spot, blights, anthracnose and powdery mildew as listed on the label. Also controls conifer diseases and lawn diseases such as brown patch, red thread, rust and dollar spot. Can be mixed with insecticides as specified on the label to make a multi-purpose spray. WHAT IS POWDERY MILDEW? Powdery Mildew looks like white fuzzy powder that accumulates on leaves and stems predominantly in ...
    Related: abstract, disease control, disease prevention, florida state, cultural practices
  • As A Young Child I Had A Most Favorite Place It Was A Tree Fort That I Built With My Big Brother On Our Wooded Property Up No - 455 words
    As a young child I had a most favorite place. It was a tree fort that I built with my big brother on our wooded property up north near a cedar swamp. Back in those days I would play all sorts of games there with friends that I would bring up to our cabin. Behind the island there is a swamp with little islands that we give nicknames to. It is a great place to play and forget schoolwork. The tree fort is not big. It is about 10 feet off the ground. That was high then but not any more. It is about 10 by 10. The walls are only 3 tall. I could easily fall out of that now. There is a small inside ladder built to climb into it. I can even remember the day like it was yesterday that we built it. It ...
    Related: big brother, favorite, fort, tree, young child
  • Barbara Kingsolvers The Bean Trees - 968 words
    Barbara Kingsolver's The Bean Trees The Bean Trees: Lessons in Life Our paths never would have met if it weren't for a bent rocker arm. Such chance meetings are often the very events that turn a person's world upside down and set it on an entirely new course. Taylor Greer, plainclothes heroine of Barbara Kingsolver's first novel The Bean Trees (copyright 1988. 232 pages. Softcover, HarperPerennial. $11.00), leaves home to look for a better life, and has motherhood dropped in her lap at a roadside service station. Taylor (born Marietta) grew up in Pittman, Kentucky, a small rural town where families had kids just about as fast as they could fall down the well and drown, and a boy with a job a ...
    Related: barbara, bean, trees, cherokee nation, real life
  • Cults Jonestown: The Terror Within - 1,055 words
    Cults - Jonestown: The Terror Within Jonestown: The Terror Within. Cults have existed throughout history since the beginning of time. A cult is defined in Webster's dictionary as a "system of religious worship with a devoted attachment to a person, principle, etc." Over the past thirty years numerous religious cults have caused " tens of thousands to abandon their families, friends, education's, and careers to follow the teaching of a leader they will never meet"(Beck 78). Opinions vary as to why people are drawn to cults. "Martin Marty, professor of religious history at the University of Chicago, attributes the growth of cults to the frustrations of seemingly rootless people"(U.S. News and ...
    Related: religious cult, terror, family ties, nursing home, devoted
  • Georgia - 1,414 words
    Georgia Georgia The state of Georgia has a total area of 152,750 sq km (58,977 sq mi), including 2618 sq km (1011 sq mi) of inland water and 122 sq km (47 sq mi) of coastal waters over which the state has jurisdiction. The state is the 24th largest in the country and has the largest land area of any state east of the Mississippi River. Georgia has a top range north to south of 515 km (320 mi) and east to west of 441 km (274 mi). The mean elevation is about 180 m (about 600 ft). Georgia occupies parts of six natural regions, or physiographic provinces. They are the Atlantic Coastal Plain, the Gulf Coastal Plain, the Piedmont, the Blue Ridge province, the Ridge and Valley province, and the App ...
    Related: georgia, georgia state, municipal government, political issues, planters
  • Indian Removal - 1,356 words
    Indian Removal INTRODUCTION On May 26, 1830, the Indian Removal Act of 1830 was passed by the Twenty-First Congress of the United states of America. After four months of strong debate, Andrew Jackson signed the bill into law. Land greed was a big reason for the federal government's position on Indian removal. This desire for Indian lands was also abetted by the Indian hating mentallity that was peculiar to some American frontiersman. This period of forcible removal first started with the Cherokee Indians in the state of Georgia. In 1802, the Georgia legislature signed a compact giving the federal government all of her claims to western lands in exchange for the government's pledge to extigiu ...
    Related: cherokee indian, indian, indian removal, indian removal act, indian territory, removal
  • Indian Removal - 1,378 words
    ... ibes wanted toprotect it so they fought for it. The soldiers from Fort Gibson began to make boundaries, construct roads, and escort delegates to the region. The soldiers also started to implement the removal process in other ways to. The soldiers of Fort Gibson were fiercly hated by the Indian tribes of that region. Yet during the many years of the indian removal, there was never a alsh between the soldiers or the tribes. An Indian was never killed by the Army. The soldiers at Fort Gibson served as a cultural buffer between the whites and the indians. The Fort was established in the 1820's by General Matthew Arbuckle. He served and commanded it through most of it's two decades during the ...
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  • Ireland Irishes - 873 words
    Ireland Irishes Like most Americans, my family is made up of many different ethnic groups. My moms side is Irish Protestant descent. My dads side is mostly English descent and a little of Native American descent from his mother. There is some in which I do not know because my dad does not know who his dad is. He was adopted by a man named David Mitchell, this is where my last name comes from. My grandmother died and never told my dad who his dad was. My dad could find out from his birth certificate, which is sealed in Albany, who his dad is. He has no desire to do that though. Over the summer, I tried to find out about my familys ancestry. I only searched on my moms side since it is easier. ...
    Related: ireland, northern ireland, ethnic groups, old world, presbyterian
  • Irland - 876 words
    Irland Like most Americans, my family is made up of many different ethnic groups. My mom's side is Irish Protestant descent. My dad's side is mostly English descent and a little of Native American descent from his mother. There is some in which I do not know because my dad does not know who his dad is. He was adopted by a man named David Mitchell, this is where my last name comes from. My grandmother died and never told my dad who his dad was. My dad could find out from his birth certificate, which is sealed in Albany, who his dad is. He has no desire to do that though. Over the summer, I tried to find out about my family's ancestry. I only searched on my mom's side since it is easier. This ...
    Related: civil war, first wave, seventeenth century, native, alcoholism
  • Jimi Hendrix - 1,647 words
    Jimi Hendrix A legend was born on November 27, 1942 in Seattle with the name of James Allen Hendrix. He was a true American of Black, White and Cherokee blood. As a child, James who later changed his name to Jimi, was very shy and was raised by friends and family. He grew up in different homes that ranged from city life to living on the Cherokee reservation with his grandmother. With all of the difficulties that he struggled with in his early life he found refuge in music. His father bought him a guitar at the age of 13 and his love for music had begun. He grew up he listening to the music of the 40's and 50's and became well aquatinted with the sounds of other eras preserved in his father's ...
    Related: hendrix, jimi, jimi hendrix, freedom of expression, true love
  • John Marshall - 463 words
    John Marshall John Marshall was born on September 24, 1755 in Prince William County, Virginia. When John was ten, his father decided that they were going to move into a valley in the Blue Ridge Mountains, almost thirty miles from the house they lived. John's parents were not well educated but they could read and write. The books were very hard to take care of and were very expensive. Marshall had a house bible but other than that they have almost no books to refer to. John's father Thomas was good friends with George Washington. Washington had a library and he let John use and was the books were very helpful. The Marshall family had decided that John would be a lawyer. John went to William a ...
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  • Lacrosse - 1,179 words
    Lacrosse Lacrosse is one of many varieties of stickball games being played by American Indians when Europeans began coming to America. Almost totally a male team sport, it is different from the others, like field hockey or roller hockey, by the use of a netted racquet with which to pick the ball off the ground, catch and throw it into or past a goal to score a point. The rules of lacrosse are simply that the ball, with few exceptions, can not be touched with the hands. Early info on lacrosse, from missionaries like French Jesuits in Huron country, is vague and often different from source to source. Their information is mostly about team size, equipment used, and the length of games and lengt ...
    Related: lacrosse, english speaking, new england, american indians, attendance
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