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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: case history

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  • Affirmative Action - 1,553 words
    Affirmative Action Affirmative Action Affirmative action is one of the more recent and popular civil rights policies that affect today's society. Affirmative action can be described as nothing more than a lower educational standard for minorities. It has become quite clear that affirmative action is unfair and unjust. However, in order to blend race, culture, and genders to create a stable and diverse society, someone has to give. How can this be justified? Is there a firm right or wrong to affirmative action? Is this policy simply taking something from one person and giving it to someone else, or is there more to this policy, such as affirmative action being a reward for years of oppression ...
    Related: action plan, affirmative, affirmative action, duke university, executive order
  • Bell Jar By Sylvia Plath Evaluation - 1,967 words
    Bell Jar By Sylvia Plath Evaluation Integrated into the story of The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath is a "case history" of a depression patient, from it's subtle beginnings to it's terrifying consequences to it's shaky resolution. On the subject of this depression, there is an article written by William Styron which, in the course of describing his own dealings with the disease, he compares it to cancer. It is my own firm opinion that this assertion is perfectly valid, and it can be shown through careful analysis of the causes and effects of both depression and cancer that this is so. In addition, using The Bell Jar as an example of a case of depression, we will see how this comparison makes clear ...
    Related: bell, bell jar, evaluation, plath, sylvia, sylvia plath, the bell jar
  • Catcher In The Rye - 1,339 words
    Catcher In The Rye Although J.D. Salinger has only one novel to his credit, that novel, The Catcher in the Rye, is recognized as an exceptional literary work. The key to the success of The Catcher in the Rye is the main character, Holden Caulfield. There are many different critics that view Holden in many different ways. Some believe Holden to be a conceited snob, while others see Holden as a Christ-like figure. It is my opinion, however, that Holden is somewhere in the middle. Holden Caulfield is a character who has a definite code of honor that he attempts to live up to and expects to as abide by as well. Since the death of his brother Allie, Holden has experienced almost a complete sense ...
    Related: catcher, catcher in the rye, the catcher in the rye, york city, main character
  • Dementiaa - 3,961 words
    ... re senile plaques (SP) and Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT). There are two types of SP, neuritic and diffuse, both plaques share antigenic determinants with the Beta amyloid 4 protein. Neuritic plaques can be distinguished by their abnormally thickened neurites ( i.e., axons or dendrites) arranged around a central core of amyloid (Mirra & Gearing, 1994). By contrast the diffuse plaques lack the thickened neurites and the amyloid core seen in the neuritic plaques (Mirra & Gearing, 1994). Plaques of both types are found in varying degrees in the neocortex, entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and in the amygdala. SP also occur in the brains of healthy people. It is only when they exceed a certain ...
    Related: cerebral cortex, nervous system, carbon dioxide, 1984, diagnosis
  • High Schools Should Not Use Standardized Achievement Scores To Determine - 364 words
    High Schools Should not use Standardized Achievement Scores to Determine Whether Students Should be Promoted, Without Regard to Course Grades High schools should not use standardized achievement test scores to determine whether students should be promoted, without regard to course grades. The major reasons that high schools should not use standardized test scores to determine whether students should be promoted, without regard to course grades are learning disorders, memory disorders, and controversy. One reason that high schools should not use standardized achievement test scores to determine whether students should be promoted, without regard to course grades is learning disorders. One cas ...
    Related: achievement, standardized, attention deficit, long-term memory, accurately
  • Judges - 1,939 words
    Judges The dictionary defines a judge as "a public officer authorized to hear and determine causes in a court of law." The following essay will deal on how to become a judge, the requirements to become a judge, salaries, and the different types of judges and what kind of information they deal with. Judges are some of the most important people in Canada. They are the men and women who sit on the benches in the courtrooms, whose responsibility it is not only to decide the fate of human beings, like themselves, but to steer and control the course of the law itself. The arrival advent of the 1982 Charter of Rights changed many things for judges. Since then, they have been handed the tasks of det ...
    Related: different types, investigative journalism, fundamental rights, interview, operation
  • Mother Love In Infancy Is As Important For Mental Health As Are Vitamins And Proteins For Physical Health Bowlby, 1951 Discus - 1,420 words
    Mother Love In Infancy Is As Important For Mental Health As Are Vitamins And Proteins For Physical Health. (Bowlby, 1951) Discuss. During the 1930s and 1940s John Bowlby, considered one of the most influential child psychiatrics, worked at a clinic for mentally disturbed adolescents. It was in this context that, between 1936 and 1939, he conducted a research on the case history of 44 patients, among whom a few had been convicted for various minor crimes, particularly for theft. The outcome of his research revealed that that 17 of them had been separated from their mother for more than six months, before the age of five. From a later similar research on other 44 adolescents mentally disturbed ...
    Related: health, important role, infancy, mental health, physical health, vitamins
  • Occupational Therapy - 1,631 words
    Occupational Therapy We are a group of occupational therapists and a new client has come to our office with the following case history: Don is a 63 year-old amateur poet. He has several of his poems published in the local newspaper but has not yet been accepted by any literary journals. Three months ago, Don had a cerebellar cerebrovascular accident that has given him significant fine motor control limitations. He is not able to hold a pencil or a pen, and when one is taped in his hand, he can not produce recognizable printing. He is able to reach a range of nearly 5 feet from side to side but cannot pick up a 1-inch cube from the table. When asked to use a keyboard, he is as likely to strik ...
    Related: occupational, occupational therapy, therapy, case history, operating system
  • Pros And Cons Of James Harriots Job - 813 words
    Pro's And Con's Of James Harriots` Job Pro's and Con's of James Harriots' Job as a vet Most people working in the medical field treat human patients, but one common medical field is Complaining about his first experience in the country, James Herriot starts out his book saying, They didn't say anything about this in the books, I thought, as the snow blew in through the gaping doorway and settled on my back. No there wasn't a word in the books about searching for your ropes and instruments in the shadows; about trying to keep clean in a half bucket of tepid water; about the cobbles digging into your chest. Nor about the slow numbing of the arms, the creeping paralysis of the muscles as the fi ...
    Related: cons, pros, case history, horror stories, buildings
  • Psychology: Case Study Eric B - 1,566 words
    Psychology: Case Study - Eric B. Case History of Eric B. Eric is a 6-year old African-american male who was raised in an impoverished inner city neighborhood in Chicago. Drugs and violence surrounded his daily life. With a single-mother who involved herself in a series of relationships with abusive boyfriends, Eric found himself beat with a belt, and may have been sexually assaulted. His mother was not home that often, and he was forced to sit outside on the stoop so that his grandmother, that also lived with them, could sell drugs. His mother was uneducated and supported the family with her public assistance grant. He has never met his father, and his uncles are in jail. His father was conv ...
    Related: case history, case study, eric, television violence, single parent
  • Sudden Infant Death Syndrome - 1,809 words
    Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Imagine the thought of a mother going in to her childs room and kissing her baby good night. Expecting to hear the gentle breath of her baby all that she hears is silence. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) is the sudden death of an infant under one year of age which remains unexplained after a thorough case investigation, including performance of a complete autopsy, examination of the death scene, and review of the clinical history (Willinger, et al., 1991). More children die of SIDS in a year that all who die of cancer, heart disease, pneumonia, child abuse, AIDS, cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy combined. Many researchers now believe that babies who die ...
    Related: infant, infant death syndrome, sudden, sudden infant death syndrome, syndrome
  • Wolf Predation - 1,025 words
    Wolf Predation Effects of Wolf Predation Abstract: This paper discusses four hypotheses to explain the effects of wolf predation on prey populations of large ungulates. The four proposed hypotheses examined are the predation limiting hypothesis, the predation regulating hypothesis, the predator pit hypothesis, and the stable limit cycle hypothesis. There is much research literature that discusses how these hypotheses can be used to interpret various data sets obtained from field studies. It was concluded that the predation limiting hypothesis fit most study cases, but that more research is necessary to account for multiple predator - multiple prey relationships. The effects of predation can ...
    Related: wolf, case history, endangered species, population dynamics, multiple
  • Wolf Predation - 983 words
    ... ates that wolf population regulation is needed when a caribou herd population declines and becomes trapped in a predator pit, wherein predators are able to prevent caribou populations from increasing. The final model that attempts to describe the effects of predation on prey populations is the stable limit cycle hypothesis. This hypothesis proposes that vulnerability of prey to predation depends on past environmental conditions. According to this theory, individuals of a prey population born under unfavorable conditions are more vulnerable to predation throughout their adult lives than those born under favorable conditions. This model would produce time lags between the proliferation of ...
    Related: wolf, north american, case history, literature cited, interference
  • Yankee Doodle Went To Town, Riding On A Pony, - 348 words
    "Yankee Doodle went to town, riding on a pony, Stuck a feather in his hat and called it macaroni." Before beginning my research, I assumed that the song above was a pointless rhyme, with about as much significance as "Mary Had A Little Lamb". However, after much research, I've learned that this poem is a reflection of colonial slang, British fashion, and the classic American tradition of the insult. "Yankee Doodle" was written by British soldiers during the Revolutionary War. While it may be used patriotically today, "Yankee Doodle" was actually a derogatory name given to American colonists by the British. It literally means "Stupid American." In order to understand the rest of this song, yo ...
    Related: riding, little lamb, american colonists, case history, revolutionary
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