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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: california gold rush

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  • California Golden Rush - 1,379 words
    ... week and often seven. Often men would be removing the sand knee deep in ice-cold water for hours on end. One miner summarized the labors of mining in these terms: "Mining is the hardest work imaginable and an occupation which very much endangers health. A weakly man might about as well go to digging his grave as to dig gold."(Rohrbough, 138). Few forty-niners were prepared for the incredibly hard work. Working fifty pans of dirt in a ten hour day was a reasonable goal. But digging the dirt to fill those pans, sorting it out, and panning for the gold became more work than most gold seekers had anticipated. For a man who could endure hardships, could handle the incredible amount of labor, ...
    Related: angeles california, california, california gold rush, california press, california university, gold rush, golden
  • Clipper Ships - 288 words
    Clipper Ships Clipper ships were extremely fast sailing ships developed primarily by the United States between the 1830's and 1860's. Clippers' did not have a final definition written in stone, but did share certain characteristics such as a sharp hull (designed for speed, not for cargo capacity) and a heavy and lofty square rig. The origin of the clipper is debatable. Some believe that it was descended from the French frigate of the late 1700's. Other's believe that it originated from the early Baltimore clipper's. It is highly probable that it was designed by many ship builders who combined their experience. The first American clippers like the Rainbow and the Sea Witch, were built in New ...
    Related: san francisco, california gold rush, gold rush, sharp, mckay
  • Indian Tribe - 919 words
    Indian Tribe The Southwest Region Native American tribe that is discussed in the following focuses on the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community. The Pima-Maricopa Indians have struggled and endured a constant hardship of events in its background, history, and location. Thomas Dobyns, the author of The Pima and Maricopa stated, "they have suffered through their worst years at the hands of ruthless investors and land grabbers, and the fight to undo the damage will never end. Descendants of the regions original inhabitants are, however, gaining skills in law, business, farming, and community organization that they are utilizing to win back the water and land that was once theirs." The Salt ...
    Related: american tribe, indian, indian tribe, tribe, california gold rush
  • The Erie Canal - 570 words
    The Erie Canal In the days before Alexander G Bells invention news and other topics of interest traveled across America quite slowly, usually becoming distorted as a result of the number of times it changed hands before the invention reached its final destination. An example of this that best exemplifies the proceeding statement is the California Gold Rush. When this news finally reached the central and eastern Americas California was made out to be a promise land with gold for the taking. As result towns popped up literally over night peppering the western United States. Although the California Gold Rush is an extreme example people of the pre phone era were also quite creative with their m ...
    Related: canal, erie, erie canal, lake erie, boarding school
  • The Robber Barons Of The 19th Century - 1,045 words
    THE ROBBER BARONS OF THE 19TH CENTURY Cornelius Vanderbuilt... ... an ill educated, ungrammatical, coarse, and ruthless, but clear-visioned man. He started his millions in the steamboat industry. As a young boy he went to work for a small steamboat owner, Thomas Gibbons. After learning how to operate a steamboat, he designed one and persuaded Gibbons to build it. Vanderbuilt's slogans of low prices for superior rates attracted many customers. But an unknown to the passengers was that the food and drink on the boat was extravagantly overpriced. Later Vanderbuilt saw that real money was in the railroad business. He established a shipping-land transit across Nicaragua, in response to the Califo ...
    Related: robber, robber barons, vertical integration, federal government, baron
  • What Made The Americans Expand Westward - 1,043 words
    What Made The Americans Expand Westward? WHAT MADE THE AMERICANS EXPAND WESTWARD? After the Louisiana Purchase in 1803, a large amount of land west of the original 13 states and the Northwest Territory was acquired. The open land, additional benefits and other existing problems encouraged Americans to expand westward. The American people began to realize that the future of the country lay in the development of its own western resources. There were many reasons that made the people face the grueling and dangerous movement west, but the primary reason was economy. "Like the Spanish conquistadors before them, the Americans looked beyond the Mississippi, they saw an open beckoning. Despite the p ...
    Related: american empire, american people, expand, westward, great lakes
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