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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: burma

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  • 1984 - 1,015 words
    1984 1. Biography George Orwell is the pen name of Eric Arthur Blair, a British writer with political conscience. He was born in India but educated in England at Eton College. He served the Indian Imperial Police in Burma from 1922 to 1927. In sick health, he returned to Europe to live in poverty as a struggling writer. Orwell joined the Republican forces in the Spanish civil war, and wrote a chilling account of this experience. He went on to write many books, mostly autobiographical, and achieved successes as a brilliant writer. 2. Synopsis The novel takes place in a theoretical and fictional dystopian totalitarian society. The story begins in London on April 4, 1984 after an atomic world w ...
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  • 1984 - 834 words
    1984 "Few novels written in this generation have obtained a popularity as great as that of George Orwells 1984." George Orwells popular and powerful novel was not just a figment of his imagination, it was spawned from many experiences from childhood to early adulthood, as well as from events circa World War II. At age eight, he was shipped off to boarding school where he was the only scholarship student among aristocrats. This was Orwells first taste of dictatorship, of being helpless under the rule of an absolute power. Unlike his classmates, Orwell was unable to afford to go to Oxford or Cambridge and his grades kept him from winning any more scholarships (Scott-Kilvert, 98). Therefore, he ...
    Related: 1984, early adulthood, marshall cavendish corporation, methods used, police
  • Ancestor Worship - 1,174 words
    Ancestor Worship 4. Compare and contrast Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism. How are they similar? How are they different? 5. Describe the Chinese tradition of ancestor worship. -Question 4. Buddhism Has over 300 million members, and was founded around 2, 500 years ago in India. The founder is Gautama Siddhartha, the Buddha, or referred to as the Enlightened One. Their major scripture are The Triptaka, Anguttara-Nikaya, Dhammapada, Sutta-Nipata, Samyutta-Nikaya and many others. Buddhism today is divided into three main sects: Theravada, or Hinayana (Sri Lanka, Thailand, Burma, Cambodia), Mahayana (China, Japan, Vietnam, Korea), and Vajrayana (Tibet, Mongolia and Japan). Their Life goal is Ni ...
    Related: ancestor worship, worship, everyday life, famous people, hunting
  • Animal Farm As Animal Satire - 2,302 words
    Animal Farm as Animal Satire Let American Consumer Counseling Help you Get Out of Debt! Animal Farm as Animal Satire This study aims to determine that George Orwell's Animal Farm is a political satire which was written to criticise totalitarian regimes and particularly Stalin's practices in Russia. In order to provide background information that would reveal causes led Orwell to write Animal Farm, Chapter one is devoted to a brief summary of the progress of author's life and significant events that had impact on his political convictions. Chapter one also presents background information about Animal Farm. Chapter two is devoted to satire. In this chapter, definition of satire is presented an ...
    Related: animal farm, farm, satire, spanish civil, nikita khrushchev
  • Animal Farm Compared To The Russian Revolution - 1,172 words
    ... ty. If they were hungry, it was because their human master didn't feed them. When the pigs wethey were with Mr. Jones as their master. With a human as their master, all of the animals' plights were caused by humans' cruelty. If they were hungry, it was because their human master didn't feed them. When the pigs were masters, the animals themselves, unawares, permitted their own downfall. Though they were hungry, they still trusted the pigs who told them that they were being fed twice as much as Mr. Jones had fed them. By trusting in the pigs, their "fellow comrades" The prosperity that the animals had hoped to achieve after the Rebellion was reached but in a different way than they had pl ...
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  • Animal Farm: Animal Satire - 2,305 words
    Animal Farm: Animal Satire A Research Paper Table Of ContentS ABSTRACT i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ii 1. CHAPTER THE AUTHOR: GEORGE ORWELL 1 1.1. PRESENTATION 1 1.2. HIS LIFE 1 1.3. HIS TIME: POLITICAL BACKGROUND 4 1.3.1. THE RUSSIAN REVOLUTION 5 1.3.2. THE SPANISH CIVIL WAR 7 1.4. ORWELL AND THE SPANISH CIVIL WAR 8 1.5. ANIMAL FARM 9 2. CHAPTER SATIRE 13 2.1. PRESENTATION 13 2.2. WHAT IS SATIRE? 13 2.2.1. DEFINITION 13 2.2.2. CHARACTERISTICS OF SATIRE 14 2.2.3. TECHNIQUES OF SATIRE 17 3. CHAPTER METHOD OF RESEARCH 19 3.1. PRESENTATION 19 3.2. PROCEDURE 19 4. CHAPTER ANIMAL FARM AS SATIRE 21 4.1. PRESENTATION 21 4.2. ELEMENTS OF SATIRE IN ANIMAL FARM 21 4.2.1. SUMMARY OF THE PLOT 22 4.2.2. SATIRICAL ...
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  • Asia - 290 words
    Asia Asia Asia is the largest of all the continents and includes within its limits an area of 17,159,995 sq mi, or about 33% of the world's total land surface and the greater part of the Eurasian land mass. The border between Europe is traditionally drawn as an imaginary zigzag line passing down the spine of the Ural Mountains and through the Caspian Sea, Caucasus Mountains, and Black Sea. The boundary dividing Asia and Africa is generally placed along the Suez Canal, and the boundary between Asia and Australasia is usually placed between the island of New Guinea and Australia. Asia is by far the most populous of all the continents, with an estimated population in 1992 of 3,275,200,000, or m ...
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  • Bansonyi - 1,021 words
    Bansonyi Art can be used to study the progression of a civilization through time. Art is usually used to express ones beliefs religiously, politically, and sometimes as a source of communication, which is accomplished through imagery. Symbols in works of art can be related to nature and myths.1 From the beginning of Chinese history, art and philosophy worked hand-in-hand with the creation of a work of art. Chinese art was used as evidence of a persons behavior and attitude towards nature and other beings (e.g. the nicer the painting the better the person.)2 During the seventh and eighth centuries Chinese art was at its peak. China at this time was under the jurisdiction of the Tang Dynasty. ...
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  • Birth Stones - 767 words
    Birth Stones From prehistoric shamans to modern consumerism birth stones have been a part of human life. Beginning as magical talismans, they have been used for thousands of years to cure the sick, strengthen the weak, and decorate the rich. Birth stones are a modern fad powered by the wisdom of history. In prehistoric times, every village had a shaman, or witch. The shaman would cast spells to do all sorts of things within the village. After time, shamans discovered that different rocks and minerals did different things. Gold would give energy and strength, while silver would grant love. The same thing worked with gems. Each was presented with a different quality in life that the stone coul ...
    Related: ancient times, human life, ten commandments, africa, emerald
  • Brief History Of Buddhism - 1,385 words
    Brief history of Buddhism Buddhism is one of the major religions of the world. It was founded by Siddhartha Guatama (Buddha) in Northeastern India. It arose as a monastic movement during a time of Brahman tradition. Buddhism rejected important views of Hinduism. It did not recognize the validity of the Vedic Scriptures, nor the sacrificial cult which arose from it. It also questioned the authority of the priesthood. Also, the Buddhist movement was open to people of all castes, denying that a person's worth could be judged by their blood. The religion of Buddhism has 150 to 350 million followers around the world. The wide range is due to two reasons. The tendency for religious affiliation to ...
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  • Buddhism - 1,347 words
    Buddhism Buddhism is probably the most tolerant religion in the world, as its teachings can coexist with any other religions. Buddhism has a very long existence and history, starting in about 565 B.C. with the birth of Siddhartha Gautama. The religion has guidelines in two forms in which Buddhist followers must follow. These are the "Four Noble Truths" and the "Eightfold Path. It all started in about 565 B.C. when Siddhartha Gautama was born. He was a young Indian prince born to the ruler of a small kingdom that is now known as Nepal. Gautama's father was said to have been told by a prophet that if Gautama saw the sick, aged, dead, or poor he would become a religious leader. If he didnt see ...
    Related: buddhism, moral code, fold path, right speech, macmillan
  • Buddhism - 1,231 words
    Buddhism Buddhism has a very long drawn out origination starting in about 565 B.C. with the birth of Siddhartha Gautama. The religion has guide lines in two forms in which Buddhist followers must follow the "Four Noble Truths" and the "Eightfold Path" There are many aspects of this religion that can be explored but the one that is most interesting seems to be it origination and it's beliefs. In about 565 B.C. Siddhartha Gautama was born, a young Indian prince born to the ruler of a small kingdom that is now known as Nepal. Gautama's birth is described as a miraculous event, his birth being the result of his mother's impregnation by a sacred white elephant that touched her left side with a lo ...
    Related: buddhism, religious life, right speech, siddhartha gautama, fold
  • Buddhism - 1,718 words
    Buddhism Buddhism is one of the major religions of the world it was founded by Siddhartha Gautama, the Buddha, who lived in northern India from c.560 to c.480 BC. The time of the Buddha was a time of social and religious change, the development of trade and cities, the breakdown of old tribal traditions, and the rise of many new religious movements that answered the demands of the times. These movements came from the Brahmanic tradition of Hinduism but were also reactions against it. Of the new sects, Buddhism was the most successful and eventually spread throughout India and most of Asia. Today Buddhism is divided into two main branches. The Theravada, or "Way of the Elders," the more conse ...
    Related: buddhism, mahayana buddhism, tantric buddhism, tibetan buddhism, changing world
  • Buddhism - 1,086 words
    Buddhism BUDDHISM INTRODUCTION There are four noble truths upon which all Buddhist teaching is based. It is said that if you do not understand these truths it is impossible for you to practice Buddhism. Buddhism, like most other religions has the potential to serve the community and produce good well-natured people. To be a successful Buddhist you must understand the interdependent nature of reality. All of Buddhist Philosophy rests on this one basic truth. In addition to this, you must also practice non-violence, this is at the very least refraining from harming others, but more specifically it means that you should do your best to help other people. When you decide to become Buddhist, you ...
    Related: buddhism, zen buddhism, siddhartha gautama, grove press, korea
  • Causes Of World War I With Relationship To Current Conflicts - 1,269 words
    Causes Of World War I With Relationship To Current Conflicts As the war of the worlds collide between the more democratic Allies and the orthodox Central powers, there were numerous causes to the war in which they can be summed up into the - isms of modern analysis. In the 19th, 20th, and even the 21st century, almost all of the conflicts can be categorized in either one or a combination of those - isms. Nationalism and Extreme Nationalism One of the causes of World War I can be linked to the use of extreme nationalism. An easily abused method, nationalism proved worthy of a war during the Napoleonic Era. Extreme nationalism was one of the causes of World War I because of the unification of ...
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  • Clash Of Civilizations - 2,240 words
    ... ed to the Western impact in one or more of three ways: rejecting both modernization and Westernization, embracing both, or embracing modernization and rejecting Westernization. In the twentieth century improvements in transportation and communication and global interdependence increased tremendously the costs of exclusion. Except for small, isolated, rural, communities willing to exist at a subsistence level, the total rejection of modernization as well as Westernization is hardly possible in a world becoming overwhelmingly modern and highly interconnected. Kemalism, which is the embrace of both concepts, is based on the assumptions that modernization is desirable and necessary, that the ...
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  • Culture Of India - 2,020 words
    Culture of India Matchmaker.com: Sign up now for a free trial. Date Smarter! Culture of India Nearly one sixth of all the human beings on Earth live in India, the world's most populous democracy. Officially titled the Republic of India, it's 1,269,413 sq. mi. lie in South Asia, occupying most of the Indian subcontinent, bordered by Pakistan (W); China, Nepal, and Bhutan (N); and Myanmar (E) and Bangladesh forms an enclave in the NE. Its borders encompass a vast variety of peoples, practicing most of the world's major religions, speaking scores of different languages, divided into thousands of socially exclusive castes, and combining the physical traits of several major racial groups (Compton ...
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  • Gandhifighter Without A Sword - 631 words
    Gandhi-Fighter Without A Sword Gandhi Fighter Without a Sword Gandhi, one of the worlds greatest figures, has already become a legend. In this book Jeanette Eaton shows him as a human being. While still a young man, Gandhi adopted the austere way of living that was until the day he died. He did not want comforts and luxuries when so many of his countrymen lived in terrible poverty. He ate only the most frugal diet and in his later years wore a peasants costume. But he himself was anything but austere. Laughter was to him lifes most healing gift, even when it was directed against himself. When young Indian children become a certain age and their body is mature enough they are allowed to get m ...
    Related: sword, small town, british empire, british army, burma
  • Genghis Khan The Terrible Mongols - 1,020 words
    ... towards Cathay. The tactics he had learned in Hsi Hsia did not helped him conquer the large fortified towns of Cathay. Genghis Khan and his army were not used to laying siege to a town so he found it difficult to conquer the Chinese. He had to slowly develop new tactics of conquering these largely fortified towns. As Genghis Khan proceeded through Cathay he laid waste to many cities and villages and utterly destroyed everything in his path. Animals were captured, treasures were stolen and the Cathayan citizens were left empty handed. After many years of fierce fighting, Genghis Khan finally conquered the city of Peking which was the center of Cathay. With this accomplished he turned bac ...
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  • George Orwell Research - 1,106 words
    George Orwell Research annon Eric Arthur Blair was born in 1903 at Motihari in British-occupied India. While growin up, he attended private schools in Sussex, Wellington and Eton. He worked at the Imperial Indian Police untill 1927 when he went to London to study the poverty stricken. He then moved to Paris where he wrote two lost novels. After he moved back to England he wrote Down and Out in Paris and London, Burmese Days, A Clergyman’s Daughter and Keep the Apidistra Flying. He published all four under the psuedonym George Orwell. He then married Eileen O’Shaughnessy and wrote The Road to Wigan Pier. Orwell then joined the Army and fought in the Spanish civil war. He became a so ...
    Related: george orwell, orwell, modern society, working class, oxford
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