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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: bubonic plague

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  • Bubonic Plague - 1,122 words
    Bubonic Plague Cantor states that, No one - peasant or aristocrat - was safe from the disease [bubonic plague], and once it was contracted, a horrible and painful death was almost a certainty. The dead and the dying lay in the streets abandoned by frightened friends and relatives (482). This certainly paints an accurate and horrifying picture of the fourteenth century during the plague. The bubonic plague, also known as the Black Death or The Plague, (Hindley 103) was one of the major scourges of the Middle Ages. It killed indiscriminately without remorse or thought of consequences. Because the plague was so widespread, theories about causes, blame and a variety of supposed cures abounded. M ...
    Related: bubonic, bubonic plague, plague, medical technology, medieval europe
  • Bubonic Plague - 577 words
    Bubonic Plague The Bubonic Plague, or Black Death, had many negative as well as positive effects on medieval Europe. While being one of the worst and deadliest diseases in the history of the world, it indirectly helped Europe break grounds for some of the basic necessities for life today. The Black Death erupted in the Gobi Desert in the late 1320s, but one really knows why. The plague bacillus was alive and active long before that; as Europe itself had suffered an epidemic in the 6th century. But the disease had lain relatively dormant in the succeeding centuries. It is believed that the climate of Earth began to cool in the 14th century, and perhaps this so-called little Ice Age had someth ...
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  • Bubonic Plague - 1,197 words
    Bubonic Plague The Bubonic plague is a contagious disease, which can reach epidemic proportions, transmitted to humans by the fleas of an infected rat. The most telltale sign of the plague is the enlarged lymph nodes in the groin, armpit, or neck. The name for the Bubonic plague originated from the name for the swollen lymph nodes: Buboes. The disease is also called the Black Death. The reason for this nickname might have been the black spots on the skin or the purplish tint on an infected persons skin. The Black Death is known as the most fatal disease of the middle ages. The bacteria called Yersinia Pestis causes the disease. The whole cycle begins with an infected rat. A rat flea (Xenopsy ...
    Related: bubonic, bubonic plague, plague, biological warfare, middle ages
  • Bubonic Plague - 396 words
    Bubonic Plague The Bubonic Plague has killed more people than any other plague. During the 1300's, the Black Death, as they called it, killed nearly half the population of Europe. They called it the Black Death because of the dark color the people's faces would turn after they died. It is caused by rod-shaped bacteria, Yersinia Pestis. The Bubonic Plague is an acute and severe infection. It is carried by the fleas on infected rodents(rat, squirrel). If the rodent or flea bites a person then it can be passed from person to person from mucus droplets spread by coughing. When infected, the person becomes ill in a few hours to a few days. The bacteria spread throughout the body. The symptoms inc ...
    Related: bubonic, bubonic plague, plague, health organization, world health
  • The Bubonic Plague - 580 words
    The Bubonic Plague The Bubonic plague .................................................. .................................... The symptoms for the Bubonic Plague are in an order. First the heart beats wildly as it tries to pump blood through swollen tissues. Next your nervous system starts to collapse into itself, causing very great pain and bizarre movements of the arms and legs. Next, as death neared, your mouth would gap open and your skin would blacken from internal bleeding. The end usually would come around the fifth day. Other symptoms are high fever (between 101 and 105 degrees F), aching limbs and the vomiting of blood. In the beginning the blood is slimy and tinted. Then it becomes ...
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  • The Bubonic Plague - 1,400 words
    THE BUBONIC PLAGUE THE BUBONIC PLAGUE Plague, was a term that was used in the Middle Ages to describe all fatal epidemic diseases, but now it is only applied to an infectious, contagious disease of rodents and humans. In humans, plague occurs in three forms: bubonic plague, pneumonic plague, and septicemic plague. The best known form is the bubonic plague and it is named after buboes, or enlarged, inflamed lymph nodes, which are characteristics of the plague in the groin or neck or armpit. Bubonic plague can only be transmitted by the bite of any of numerous insects that are normally parasitic on rodents and that seek new hosts when the original host dies. If the plague is left untreated it ...
    Related: bubonic, bubonic plague, plague, world war ii, good idea
  • The Bubonic Plague - 1,473 words
    THE BUBONIC PLAGUE Rana Kundu Introduction Plague, was a term that was applied in the Middle Ages to all fatal epidemic diseases, but now it is only applied to an acute, infectious, contagious disease of rodents and humans, caused by a short, thin, gram-negative bacillus. In humans, plague occurs in three forms: bubonic plague, pneumonic plague, and septicemic plague. The best known form is the bubonic plague and it is named after buboes, or enlarged, inflamed lymph nodes, which are characteristics of the plague in the groin or neck or armpit. Bubonic plague can only be transmitted by the bite of any of numerous insects that are normally parasitic on rodents and that seek new hosts when the ...
    Related: bubonic, bubonic plague, plague, northern india, world war ii
  • 17th Century Poetry - 543 words
    17Th Century Poetry The seventeenth century was a time of difficult changes and uncertainties. During these chaotic years many poets and philosophers expressed their thoughts and emotions through literature. This paper will briefly describe the seventeenth century and will include quotes and philosophies of poets such as John Donne, John Milton and Richard Lovelace. Life in the seventeenth century can be described as violent. After Queen Elizabeths death, James I, her successor created disorder when he wanted everyone to be Anglican. This soon led to the beheading of his successor, King Charles I. Throughout this century England saw many different rulers and seven civil wars. During the last ...
    Related: century england, century poetry, poetry, seventeenth century, civil wars
  • Aids In Africa - 462 words
    Aids In Africa Horrors in the news Action on AIDS in Africa Imagine 40 million hungry and destitute orphans in sub-Saharan Africa by the year 2010 roaming the streets without schooling and work, prime candidates for the criminal gangs, marauding militias and child armies that have slaughtered and mutilated tens of thousands of civilians in countries like sierra Leone and Liberia in the last decade. This is the kind of nightmare that prompted the united nations security council to convene yesterday for an unprecedented examination of health issue- the global spread of ADIS, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, where experts predict that more people will die off AIDS, in the next decade than have ...
    Related: africa, aids, aids prevention, saharan africa, south africa, sub-saharan africa
  • Aids In Detail - 2,050 words
    AIDS In Detail Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Today, despite the continuing production of better antibiotics since the discovery of penicillin, we are facing an infectious disease against which all these drugs are virtually powerless. This disease is spreading inexorably, killing more people and more people each year. AIDS does not know no national boundaries and does not discriminate by race or sex. It is rampaging not only throughout the United States, but also through Africa, India, China, Russia, Europe, South America, and the Caribbean countries. Even infants and children are at risk. AIDS is similar to the bubonic plague or the "BLACK DEATH" that killed perhaps one-third in ...
    Related: aids, aids epidemic, infectious disease, human immunodeficiency, purple
  • Antibiotics - 1,650 words
    Antibiotics Antibiotics have played a major role in our society thanks to Sir Alexander Fleming's careful observations in 1928. Without it, many lives would be in danger due to infectious diseases. Antibiotics are chemical substances produced by various species of microorganisms and other living systems that are capable in small concentrations of inhibiting the growth of or killing bacteria and other microorganisms. These organisms can be bacteria, viruses, fungi, or animals called protozoa. A particular group of these agents is made up of drugs called antibiotics, from the Greek word anti ("against") and bios ("life"). Some antibiotics are produced from living organisms such as bacteria, fu ...
    Related: medical profession, half lives, printing office, concentration, permanent
  • Antibiotics And Children - 1,429 words
    Antibiotics And Children A very important issue concerning the children of today is the excess prescribing of antibiotics and the dangers that are being created. Everyday, more and more children are being prescribed any easy solution to a very tough problem. There is a constant push from pharmaceutical companies, parents, and massive marketing companies to try the next antibiotic remedy, but as we look towards the future and the diseases that can be created by this quick fix, we should turn to our attention to alternatives remedies. What is so terrible about this situation is that the worst-case scenario of the effects of the mass doses of antibiotics they ingest is an untreatable bacterium ...
    Related: drug administration, immune system, bubonic plague, letting, pneumonia
  • Black Death - 685 words
    Black Death In the 1340s, approximately one third to one half the population of Europe was wiped out by what was called The Black Death. The people of the time were armed with little to no understanding of why and how the plague happened and how to control it; and this allowed for the vast destruction that occurred in little more than three years time. The origin of the epidemic has, with little doubt, been identified as Lake Issyk-Koul in what is now a part of Russian Central Asia. A flood, or some other natural disaster, drove various rodents from their habitats around the lake; and with them they carried fleas infected with the plague. A species of wild rodents normally isolated from huma ...
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  • Black Death - 684 words
    Black Death In the 1340s, approximately one third to one half the population of Europe was wiped out by what was called "The Black Death". The people of the time were armed with little to no understanding of why and how the plague happened and how to control it; and this allowed for the vast destruction that occurred in little more than three years time. The origin of the epidemic has, with little doubt, been identified as Lake Issyk-Koul in what is now a part of Russian Central Asia. A flood, or some other natural disaster, drove various rodents from their habitats around the lake; and with them they carried fleas infected with the plague. A species of wild rodents normally isolated from hu ...
    Related: black death, natural disaster, large numbers, central asia, visiting
  • Black Plague - 1,071 words
    Black Plague Living in Europe in the middle of the 1300s would have been heartbreaking and dreadful. Not only were the living conditions very poor but there was an unknown disease that was wiping out a large percentage of European population. One cannot imagine the fear of wondering whether you or someone you loved was going to catch this deadly disease. No explanation would make a person feel safe from catching it or dying with it. The people of Europe just lived their lives as best they could realizing that nothing they do could ever stop this. They did not have the power to stop this it was far too beyond them. This unknown disease is known as the Bubonic Plague. The plague was passed amo ...
    Related: black death, black plague, bubonic plague, plague, living conditions
  • Brigadoon - 1,095 words
    Brigadoon I recently attended the play, Brigadoon by loewe and lerner, at my local college theater. Through all of the plays mystical events and songs, I noticed some very important details. I chose to compare the ideas in the play to some specific ideas held by a group of people in Italy. The mounted their ideas together to form a period in our history called the Renaissance. This was the first thing that came to my mind when I was thinking about my comparison. A play acts as its own time period as it resembles a mere image of real life. A play could relate to almost any person, place, or thing. The first comparison I would like to talk about deals with themes. The Renaissance period is oft ...
    Related: domestic life, great artists, black death, deeply, fiona
  • Cancer In American - 331 words
    Cancer in American In modern society cancer is the disease most feared by the majority of people throughout the world, supplanting the "white death," or tuberculosis, of the last century; the "black death," or bubonic plague, of the Middle Ages; and the leprosy of biblical times. Cancer has been known and described throughout history, although its greater prevalence today is undoubtedly due to the conquest by medical science of most infectious diseases and to the increased life span of humans. The study of cancer is known as the field of ONCOLOGY. In the mid-1980s nearly 6 million new cancer cases and more than 4 million deaths from cancer were being reported world-wide each year. The most c ...
    Related: american, american cancer, breast cancer, cancer, cancer society, lung cancer, skin cancer
  • Caravans Of Gold - 1,178 words
    Caravans Of Gold MIGHTY PEOPLE OF COLOR: An Essay on "Caravans of Gold" and "Africa: A History Denied" A powerful and peaceful land of trade and scholarship was established in Africa long before European ships even landed there. ereat African Empires flourished from the wealth of Africa's natural resources that marked its rich and lavish history. Though Europeans and Arabs, people who most benefited from the wealth of Africa, denied Africa its legacy, the magnificence of people of color is embedded in the history of powerful empires such as Ghana, Mali, Songhai, Cairo, and Zimbabwe. The gold deposits of West Africa brought great wealth to the surrounding people from which great empires emerg ...
    Related: africa asia, west africa, political power, cairo, intelligent
  • England Latin Anglia, Political Division Of The Island Of Great Britain, Constituting, With Wales, The Principal Division Of - 4,705 words
    ... ion that was to last for 400 years. William was a hard ruler, punishing England, especially the north, when it disputed his authority. His power and efficiency can be seen in the Domesday Survey, a census for tax purposes, and in the Salisbury Oath of allegiance, which he demanded of all tenants. He appointed Lanfranc, an Italian clergyman, as archbishop of Canterbury. He also promoted church reform, especially by the creation of separate church courts, but retained royal control. When William died in 1087, he gave England to his second son, William II (Rufus), and Normandy to his eldest son, Robert. Henry, his third son, in due time got bothEngland in 1100, when William II died in a hun ...
    Related: bank of england, church of england, division, great britain, great schism, latin, political ideas
  • Hawaii By James Michener - 2,131 words
    ... ey to the New Orleans, Colorado, and Nebraska sugar tycoons. Pretty soon they would all be bankrupt. The McKinley Tariff protected the United States sugar producers by penalizing those who imported Hawaiian sugar, and subsidized those who sold American sugar. So Whip and the eight others devised a plan to begin a revolution, seize control of the government, and turn the islands over to the United States. Queen Liliuokalani was the new queen, succeeding her brother after he died. She wished that the non-Hawaiian enterprises would leave; this included Whip and his companions. The coalition planned to begin a revolution, with the help of their friend and relative Micah Hale - a minister. Th ...
    Related: hawaii, point of view, armed forces, social class, sank
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