Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: young adulthood

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  • Anerexia Nervosa - 769 words
    Anerexia Nervosa ANOREXIA NERVOSA In this paper, we will be describing a crucial disorder that affects many teenagers. This disorder is Anorexia Nervosa, better known as Anorexia. Anorexia Nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by constant dieting, rapid weight loss and the feeling of being to fat during weight loss. Most anorexics are women and teenage girls, who see their self as being overweight even though they are deathly underweight. The term "Anorexia Nervosa" means loss of appetite due to nerves, but the people with anorexia do not actually lose their appetite until the late stages of their starvation. Until then they just do feel hungry but they will not eat. There are numerous ...
    Related: anorexia nervosa, nervosa, social changes, family therapy, starvation
  • Anorexia: A Problem We All Must Face - 1,569 words
    ... and mental health problems and their development usually have a number of different contributing and perpetuating factors, as stated by organizations around the world dedicated to eating disorders. These factors could be any, or a combination of physical, emotional or sexual trauma, cultural emphasis or preoccupation with body image ideals, peer influences, loss and grief, starvation, brain chemistry, purging behaviors, physiological effects of dieting, relationships, stress, coping styles. It is this list that is generally understood universally as the possible causes of all eating disorders, and they apply directly to anorexia. Society plays a role without a doubt, constant pressures s ...
    Related: anxiety disorder, third stage, body image, degradation, plain
  • Argumetative Single Gender Schooling - 855 words
    Argumetative Single Gender Schooling Single Gender Schooling: A better learning environment For years, educators have searched for better and more effective ways of teaching. Their efforts have resulted in the specialization of instruction according to the specific needs of different students. We have seen therefore, specific classes for dyslexic children, special instruction for visual learners, teaching methods, which target non-native English speakers etc. At a more basic level however, the separation of our educational efforts by gender, has proven to be controversial at best. I believe that grouping young students according to sex, provides a better learning environment and is more cond ...
    Related: gender, schooling, talk shows, native english, peer
  • Biography Malcolm X - 1,023 words
    Biography Malcolm X Malcolm X The name Malcolm X still stirs emotions of fear and hatred in many Americans. When he was murdered in the Ballroom in Harlem on February 21, 1965, he was world-famous as the angriest black man in America. This is true because unlike Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X advocated freedom for blacks by any means necessary. For him, even the use of violence was a viable solution to fight racial discrimination. Because of such views some people still associate Malcolm X with the Black Panther movement of the sixties which they believe was a radical and violent organization. But portraying Malcolm X simply as a violent black activist fails to represent the whole picture ...
    Related: biography, malcolm, malcolm x, racial discrimination, junior high school
  • Biography Malcolm X - 1,033 words
    ... the membership reached approximately 30,000 by 1963. Malcolm X was very outspoken. He was never afraid to speak to the public about what he believed in even if it was dangerous to do so. Especially during the sixties, it was very dangerous for the blacks to speak unpleasant things about the whites. Although the American society was out of slavery, the social atmosphere was negative for blacks and the whites were very abusive to the blacks physically and mentally. Regardless of perilous surroundings, Malcolm X made lots of shocking statements in his speeches. Those statements aroused the blacks and encouraged them to think and recognize how discriminated their lives were. He gathered hug ...
    Related: biography, malcolm, malcolm x, elijah muhammad, afro american
  • Carl Gustav Jung - 1,811 words
    ... driving force to be a complete person! The self is the central archetype in the col lective unconscious, much as the sun us the center of the solar system. It unites the personality. When a person says he feels in harmony with himself and with the world, we can be sure that the self archetype is performing its work effectively. There are three ways how your psyche works together. One structure may compensate for the weakness of another structure, one component may oppose another component, and two or more structures may unite to form a synthesis. Compensation may be illustrated by the contrasting attitudes of extraversion and introversion. If extraversion is the dominant or superior att ...
    Related: carl, carl gustav jung, gustav, gustav jung, jung
  • Carl Gustav Jung 18751961 Was A Son Of A Minister In Switzerland He Was Born On July 26, In The Small Village Of Kesswil On L - 1,358 words
    ... reasons for passionate attraction or aversion. So, for example, if I always thought that women were nagging, then I would project that notion onto my wife, and think that she is nagging, although she is perfectly customary. If he experience a "passionate attraction," then the woman undoubtedly has the same traits as his anima-image of woman. Western civilization seems to place a high value on conformity and to disparage femininity in men and masculinity in women. The disparagement beings in childhood when "sissies" and "tomboys" are ridiculed. Peter was expected to be kind and gentle, which would bring derision. Boys are simply expected to conform to a culturally specified masculine role ...
    Related: carl, carl gustav jung, gustav, gustav jung, jung, minister, switzerland
  • Charles Dickens - 548 words
    Charles Dickens Charles *censored*ens charles *censored*en's early life was greatly influential in his most famous novels. his childhood was full of tragedies and problems. *censored*ens needed to overcome several obstacles so that he could have a chance at an education. after defeating these hurdles, *censored*ens wrote the novels that have entertained many people for many generations. most of the obstacles that *censored*ens had to face were in his childhood. as a very young child, his father began to go into debt. eventually john *censored*ens was jailed for excessive debt and charles had to work at a boot blackening factory. *censored*ens was able to continue his education after hsi fath ...
    Related: charles dickens, young adulthood, christmas carol, education after, relative
  • Cinema Paradiso - 1,121 words
    Cinema Paradiso Cinema Paradiso In the film "Cinema Paradiso", Toto, the main character, is a lost child without a father to provide a male role model. The story begins after Toto is informed of the death of his dearest friend, Alfredo. At this point, Toto is a mature man and a successful film director, having long ago left his home town, Giancaldo. Throughout the movie, however, Toto is a young boy with little parental support and direction. The young Toto develops a friendship with Alfredo, the film projectionist at Giancaldo's only cinema, the Cinema Paradiso. Alfredo takes Toto under his supervision and eventually agrees to take him as an apprentice. As Toto becomes familiar with the ins ...
    Related: cinema, paradiso, main character, world war ii, nice
  • Confucius - 1,912 words
    Confucius FOUNDERS Confucius is the founder of Confucianism. The name Confucius is the Latin name for Kong Qiu-zi. Confucius was born in the village of Zou in the country of Lu in 551 BC. He was a poor descendant of a disposed noble family. As a child, he held fake temple rituals; as a young adult, quickly earned a reputation for fairness, politeness, and love of learning, and he was reputed to be quite tall. When he was 35 years old, Duke Zhao of Lu led his country to war, this was routed and fled to Qi. While he was there, Duke Zhao would frequently go to him for advice, but after the counsel of one of his minister, Zhao was unable to give Confucius land and eventually stopped seeking advi ...
    Related: confucius, young adult, chinese culture, young adulthood, poems
  • Cystic Fibrosis - 1,215 words
    Cystic Fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis Cystic fibrosis is the most common lethal inherited disease, affecting about 30,000 patients worldwide. In the past decade, strides in patient management and the development of new pharmacological agents, coupled with scientific and technologic advances, have increased the mean life expectancy of CF patients to approximately 30 years of age (approximately 50% of CF patients live to the age of 30). As early as 30 years ago, the median survival age was 8 years. Chronic lung infections, which lead to declines in lung function, remain the major cause of morbidity and mortality. While several pathogens have been implicated, Pseudomonas aeruginosa - an opportunistic ...
    Related: cystic, cystic fibrosis, fibrosis, men and women, physical therapy
  • Eating Disorders - 1,123 words
    Eating Disorders 11-2-01 Eating Disorders Bulimia is an illness characterized by uncontrolled episodes of overeating usually followed by self-induced vomiting or other purging. Alternative names for Bulimia are Bulimia Nervosa, Binge-Purge Behavior, and also Eating Disorders. In bulimia, eating binges may occur as often as several times a day. Induced vomiting known as purging allows the eating to continue without the weight gain; it may continue until interrupted by sleep, abdominal pain, or the presence of another person. The person is usually aware that their eating pattern is abnormal and may experience fear or guilt associated with the binge-purge episodes. The behavior is usually secre ...
    Related: binge eating, disorders, eating disorder, eating disorders, eating habits, mental disorder
  • Ericsons Theory - 390 words
    Ericsons Theory Erik H. Erikson, just like many others, had a theory of socialization process. In his theory during a human's life they will meet main challenges during eight points in their life. The first stage is during infancy, from birth until about the age of eighteen months. This is the time that infants must begin to trust people, and have the feeling of being safe. As you would assume family and people that spend a lot of time with them during this time, help the infant overcome this. The next dilemma one faces comes between the ages of 18 months and three years of age. This is when they try to become in control of the actions. Between the ages of four and five kids learn to interac ...
    Related: social process, intimate relationships, older people, infant, adulthood
  • Erik Erikson - 1,883 words
    Erik Erikson Erik Homberger Erikson was born in 1902 near Frankfort, Germany to Danish parents. Erik studied art and a variety of languages during his school years, rather than science courses such as biology and chemistry. He did not prefer the atmosphere that formal schooling produced so instead of going to college he traveled around Europe, keeping a diary of his experiences. After a year of doing this, he returned to Germany and enrolled in art school. After several years, Erickson began to teach art and other subjects to children of Americans who had come to Vienna for Freudian training. He was then admitted into the Vienna Psychoanalytic Institute. In 1933 he came to the U.S. and becam ...
    Related: erik, erik erikson, erikson, pacific coast, society and culture
  • Evaluating My Life In Light Of Eriksons Psychosocial Stages - 697 words
    Evaluating My Life In Light Of Erikson's Psychosocial Stages Evaluating My Life In Light Of Eriksons Psychosocial Stages I think, over the period involving the first 12 to 18 months of my life, I was able to resolve the first of Eriksons psychosocial stages adequately. My mother, during this time, supplied me with appropriate provisions of food, warmth, and the comfort of physical closeness. This allowed me to understand and accept that objects and people exist even when I could not see them. This was a major stepping stone where the foundation for trust became important. In the next period of my life, from about 18 months to 3 years of age, I was able to resolve the second of Eriksons psych ...
    Related: evaluating, psychosocial, psychosocial development, third stage, issues involved
  • Insomnia - 1,289 words
    Insomnia In this research paper I will attempt to familiarize you, the reader, on the role of sleep, health risks of sleeping disorder that is most common, Insomnia. I will give you some of the aspects which cause Insomnia and how it can be treated. We human beings spend one third of our lives in a mysterious, potentially dangerous and seemingly unproductive state of unconsciousness---and no one knows exactly why. Scientists have attempted to study the effects of sleep and its role on our existence but have yet to come up with an accurate reason why we need sleep. Yes, we do need sleep. All animals, be they mammal, amphibian, aquatic, etc., need some form of sleep in order to rejuvenate thei ...
    Related: insomnia, mind and body, important role, sleep patterns, diabetes
  • Juvenile Delinquency - 575 words
    Juvenile Delinquency There is no doubt that various experts can give us many theories as to the causes of juvenile delinquency, including one's economic background, substance abuse, delinquent peer groups, repeated exposure to violence, increased availability of firearms and media violence, however, I feel that the number one cause of juvenile delinquency is the breakdown of families, including lack of parental control over children. It is ironic in America, today, one must have a driver's license to operate a vehicle, a permit to own a gun and even a license to own a dog, but one does not have to have training or a license in order to become a parent. Without specialized educational program ...
    Related: delinquency, juvenile, juvenile delinquency, young adulthood, media influence
  • Lifes Progression - 385 words
    Life's Progression Lifes Progression Most everyone has been at a point in their lives that crucial decisions have to be made about their future. Each one of us has set specific goals that we feel need to be achieved for our future. As we grow older the goals that we set early in our young adulthood become increasingly important. We are aware of drastic changes, which will be occurring, in our lives; therefore, we place importance on a few specific goals that we feel are important to us. Upcoming retirement is becomes increasingly important to us. Employment in the military has created a sense of security. Job security is one issue; in fact, knowing the military wouldnt go out of business or ...
    Related: progression, higher level, young adulthood, higher education, attain
  • Memory - 1,151 words
    Memory Improvement Memory is defined as the accuracy and ease with which a person can retain and recall past experiences (Webster`s Dictionary, pg. 611). It is often thought of as a capacity, such as a cup, that could be full or empty. A more common comparison is one to a computer. Some minds, like computers, can have more software, being able to save and recall more experiences, information, and memories than others can. And like a computer, minds can be upgraded. This is not done with a simple installation of a chip, but by following a number of small procedures that will enhance and sharpen a memory. As people age, many people believe that the loss of memory is inevitable. Once people go ...
    Related: long term memory, long-term memory, short-term memory, nelson mandela, young adulthood
  • Otto Rank - 1,462 words
    Otto Rank Otto (Rosenfield) Rank was born in Vienna, Austria on April 27, 1884. Otto changed his name to "Rank" in young adulthood. He felt that this symbolized self - creation, which is his main ideal in life. Otto's family was not wealthy enough to send him and his brother to college, so Otto became a locksmith while his older brother studied law. He loved music, art, writing poems, reading philosophy and literature. After reading Freud's Interpretation of Dreams, Otto used psychoanalytic ideas in his manuscript on the artist. Otto met Sigmund Freud in 1905 through his family doctor, Alfred Adler. This meeting was to prove very important for Otto. He took along with him a manuscript of his ...
    Related: dr. rank, otto, rank, doctorate degree, social structure
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