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  • 1984 - 1,219 words
    ... statements that change every day. The other reason for the diary is so that in the future, people will be able to read what really, and to inform them about beliefs on the party. Like Winston, I believe George Orwell wrote 1984 in order to allow a communist country to be revealed, the Soviet Union. Orwells goal was to expose the falsehoods of the Soviet Union as the model of a socialist state. He also wanted to reveal the dangers of totalitarianism, the deterioration of objective truth, and the well thought-out manipulation of Oceanias common peoples through propaganda. The Ministry of Truth is where history and facts both significant and insignificant are rewritten to reflect the party' ...
    Related: 1984, critical essays, power over, winston smith, scare
  • 1984 - 661 words
    1984 1984 as an Anti-Utopian Novel A utopia is an ideal or perfect community. While some writers have created fictional places that embody their ideals societies, other writers have written satires that ridicule existing conditions of society, or anti-utopias, which show possible future societies that are anything but ideal. In 1984 , George Orwell presents a terrifying picture of future as life under the constant surveillance of Big Brother. This book 1984 is an anti-utopian novel. The main character Winston Smith lives in the large political country Oceania, which is eternally at war with one of two huge countries, Eurasia and Eastasia. At any moment all existing records show either that O ...
    Related: 1984, love affair, works cited, george orwell, affair
  • A Victim Of The Double Rape - 1,609 words
    ... e slaughtered in the imminent attack, the old woman suggested, Marina should gather possessions and seek refuge at the old woman's house, where, later, she could marry the woman's son. Marina pretended to accept the offerbut put the old woman off until night, warning her that Cortes' troops were on guard and would hear them. Marina then pumped the woman for more informationThe woman's husband, it turned out, was a Tlaxcalan captain who had, along with others, received gifts from the wily Moctezuma to help ambush Cortes (Adams 8). The information she was able to get from the old woman protected hundreds of Spanish from bloodshed. Another person La Malinche negotiated with was the great Mo ...
    Related: double, rape, new mexico, rutgers university, aztecs
  • Aids Related Stigma Since The Appearance Of Aids In The Late Seventies And Early Eighties, The Disease Has Had Attached To It - 1,516 words
    ... lthough some things have changed and laws have been passed, the effects if stigma are still prevalent. Many people still express feelings of fear and hostility towards PLWAs (OHare, et al., 1996). Most of the negative attitudes felt and expressed are irrational but the effects can be devastating. One effect is peoples tendency to avoid all contact with PLWAs which contributes to social isolation. Also, even though legislation has been passed, discrimination still does exist. When asked about the treatment he received at Montreal General Hospital, an HIV positive patient explained that AIDS discrimination is far from being eradicated and that PLWAs are treated in a very negative fashion i ...
    Related: aids, seventies, stigma, issues surrounding, care system
  • Anaximander - 1,487 words
    Anaximander Anaximander About 530 AD the Neoplatonist Simplicius wrote an extensive commentary on Aristotle's Physics. In it he reproduced the Anaximander fragment, thus preserving it for the western world. He copied it from Theophrastus. From the time Anaximander pronounced his saying--we do not know where or when or to whom--to the moment Simplicius jotted it down in his commentary more than a millennium elapsed. Between the time of Simplicius' jotting and the present moment lies another millennium-and-a-half. Can the Anaximander fragment, from a historical and chronological distance of two thousand five hundred years, still say something to us? (Heidegger 16) Anaximander, it is widely bel ...
    Related: martin heidegger, early greek, final question, philosophy, necessity
  • Andrew Jacksons And The Battle Of New Orleans - 1,314 words
    Andrew Jacksons And The Battle Of New Orleans Andrew Jackson And The Battle Of New Orleans The Battle of New Orleans was one of the last remarkable conflicts in history. The last major land battle of the war was the war of 1812. The battle of New Orleans was fought after the treaty of peace ending the hostilities, was signed. The United states declared war on Great Britain in June of 1812. The war did not threaten Louisiana till the end of the war with the battle of New Orleans because most of the war had been fought on the border of Canada. The British force had more than 5,000 veterans, a little less than one half of them died at the battle of New Orleans. The Americans had about 5,700 men ...
    Related: andrew, andrew jackson, new orleans, war of 1812, american revolution
  • Animal Testing - 1,686 words
    Animal Testing Please Read This Warning Before You Use This Essay for Anything (It Might Save Your Life) Animal Testing Using animals for testing is wrong and should be banned. They have rights just as we do. Twenty-four hours a day humans are using defenseless animals for cruel and most often useless tests. The animals have no way of fighting back. This is why there should be new laws to protect them. These legislations also need to be enforced more regularly. Too many criminals get away with murder. Although most labs are run by private companies, often experiments are conducted by public organizations. The US government, Army and Air force in particular, has designed and carried out many ...
    Related: animal experimentation, animal liberation, animal rights, animal testing, testing
  • Applied Nostalgia - 2,252 words
    ... an apocalypse not. The 1950s and the 1990s are utterly and completely different. The 1950s was a post-war time, where utterly irreproducible affects kept mom at home. The 1990s is a technology laden information society, where media pries into corners and brings problems into greater light including violence, rape, birth control, and AIDS. The amount of nuclear families decreased (Two 1), yet the cause for the dissolve of the family outweighs the difficulties, the equalization of women in the work force. No longer do mothers rely on the male's income, they can survive on their own. Their ties of help flutter free and the American women becomes free since the American ideals put forth in ...
    Related: sexual education, single parent, employee loyalty, educating, guide
  • Are Humans Inherently Evil - 459 words
    Are Human's Inherently Evil A great man once remarked "All men are created equal". Well that observation was correct, except that mankind is only equal in the eyes of moral judgment. Here I will show how man is inherently evil, but not at his request. There can be a wide spectrum of emotions that mankind can display, but these days the dominant traits are greed and hatred. Emotions and environmental stimuli dictate our actions. Every action we display has been impacted upon by some other outside force, be it another person or how your day is going. Deep down people have to desire to be good, but the evil inside us all always finds a way to burrow to the top. For millennia man has fought his ...
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  • Atomic - 2,186 words
    ... re were no smells. There was no movement. Every step I took made a gravelly squeak in blue-white frost. And every squeak was echoed loudly. The season of locking was over. The Earth was locked up tight (179).This description eerily resembles what many have said the Earth will look like during a nuclear winter (Stone, 62). In addition to Dr. Hoenikker and his doomsday games, Vonnegut provides an interesting analysis of atomic age society with the Bokonon religion. This religion, completely made up by Vonnegut and used in this novel, is the religion of every single inhabitant of San Lorenzo, the books imaginary banana republic. This is the island where Jonah eventually ends up, and where t ...
    Related: atomic, atomic bomb, collected poems, nuclear waste, ripper
  • Attachment Theory - 1,005 words
    ... and work, Even an infant's brain is affected by attachment disorder. The brain is greatly affected by the infant's experiences. It has been found that an infants brain growth is directly related to how much his mother or primary caretaker speaks to him. Although my focus is on the infancy stage of development, some studies have shown that attachment begins even before birth. The expectant mother's attitude about her pregnancy has a great affect on the unborn child. Whether or not she abuses substances during her pregnancy also affects the development of the child. The babies will feel all that the mother goes through. The baby will already begin the attachment if the mother is happy and ...
    Related: attachment, attachment disorder, attachment theory, substance abuse, online available
  • August Wilsons Fences - 1,827 words
    August Wilsons Fences It is easy to make the case that August Wilson's play Fences is a tragedy and that Troy Maxson is its tragic protagonist. Few comedies end with a funeral, and there is no denying that Troy's character and life are the stuff of tragedy. But Wilson's vision is much larger than Troy's heroic side, his deeds and omissions. Troy, for all his strengths, is flawed humanity in need of grace and forgiveness. Such grace and forgiveness are the spirit of true comedy, and a case can be made for viewing Fences as a comedy or, perhaps, a metacomedy. The term is taken from Christopher Isherwood, who took it from Gerald Heard: I think the full horror of life must be depicted, but in th ...
    Related: august wilson, human beings, social darwinism, sylvan barnet, gabe
  • Auschwitz - 1,785 words
    Auschwitz Auschwitz began as a barracks camp in the town of Oswiecim, for the polish army in the early 1930's. Germany then captured Poland and needed another location for Polish political prisoners. In 1940, the German SS sent a commission to Oswiecim to see if the barracks there could be used. The first inspection reported that it could not be used, however, a later inspection stated that after a few minor changes it would be useable. On May 4, 1940 Rudolf Hoss officially established it as a German concentration camp. Hoss was Auschwitz's first commandant. Auschwitz was originally intended for Polish political prisoners and other Poles. In June of 1940, the first load of prisoners arrived. ...
    Related: auschwitz, polish army, melting pot, political prisoners, rations
  • Auschwitz - 1,785 words
    Auschwitz Auschwitz began as a barracks camp in the town of Oswiecim, for the polish army in the early 1930's. Germany then captured Poland and needed another location for Polish political prisoners. In 1940, the German SS sent a commission to Oswiecim to see if the barracks there could be used. The first inspection reported that it could not be used, however, a later inspection stated that after a few minor changes it would be useable. On May 4, 1940 Rudolf Hoss officially established it as a German concentration camp. Hoss was Auschwitz's first commandant. Auschwitz was originally intended for Polish political prisoners and other Poles. In June of 1940, the first load of prisoners arrived. ...
    Related: auschwitz, russian army, black market, york harper, polish
  • Auschwitz - 1,785 words
    Auschwitz Auschwitz began as a barracks camp in the town of Oswiecim, for the polish army in the early 1930's. Germany then captured Poland and needed another location for Polish political prisoners. In 1940, the German SS sent a commission to Oswiecim to see if the barracks there could be used. The first inspection reported that it could not be used, however, a later inspection stated that after a few minor changes it would be useable. On May 4, 1940 Rudolf Hoss officially established it as a German concentration camp. Hoss was Auschwitz's first commandant. Auschwitz was originally intended for Polish political prisoners and other Poles. In June of 1940, the first load of prisoners arrived. ...
    Related: auschwitz, encyclopedia americana, york harper, pregnant women, benches
  • Beauty And The Beast: Anorexia - 1,179 words
    ... ikely picture of a soon-to-be-anorectic child can be drawn. As a child, anorectics are described as tomboys that shared interests with her father such as sports and watching football. They are described as obedient children that never wanted to grow up (Crisp, 1980, p.48). Maturation in puberty develops anxiety in most girls. The first step for females in puberty is the development of breasts, leading to embarrassment and the feeling of fatness. Other changes happen that are very undesired such as the thickening of the stomach and thighs and menstruation. Girls tend to take these natural changes as changes happening to them instead of a natural process that happens to all females. They d ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, beauty and the beast, york harper, last year
  • Benjamin Franklin - 1,724 words
    Benjamin Franklin A+ Essays Benjamin Franklin (An A+ Essays Original Paper, written by WeirdHTML) Benjamin Franklin was one of the first and most famous scientists in America. He was a man of many talents and interests. Franklin was always curios about they way things work, and he always tried to find ways to make them work better. Even though he started out as a published, he was always interested in science. However this interest soon became a passion to Franklin. He even retired from his publishing business to work in a laboratory with his mostly homemade equipment. Throughout his life Benjamin Franklin made many important discoveries and theories which greatly influenced future scientist ...
    Related: autobiography of benjamin franklin, benjamin, benjamin franklin, franklin, franklin stove
  • Book Review Of Kozols Savage Inequalities - 1,168 words
    Book Review Of Kozol's Savage Inequalities Jonathan Kozol. Savage Inequalities: Children in America's Schools. New York, Harper Collins, 1991. 262 pp. In this detailed and shocking book, Jonathan Kozol describes the horrific and unjust conditions in which many children in today's society are forced to get their education. Kozol discusses three major reasons for the discrepancies in America's schools today: disparities of property taxes, racism, and the conflict between state and local control. The first of these reasons is that of the differences of available property tax revenues. Kozol discusses the inconsistencies in property tax revenues and the problem that the poorer districts aren't g ...
    Related: book review, jonathan kozol, savage, savage inequalities, york harper
  • Brca Brca - 2,261 words
    ... ient pamphlet) When BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation is inherited it is considered a dominant factor. People receive one BRCA1 allele from their mom and one BRCA1 allele from their dad. The same goes for any other gene pairs. BRCA1 is not just inherited by women, but men as well. It is NOT a sex-linked trait. In order to study how organisms inherit genes, health care professionals use a Punnet square in order to understand how people inherit a gene. Finding out if a person does have a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation is another process. (Myriad Genetic Pamphlet) DIAGRAM 5 Inherited alleles of family tumor suppressor gene predispose individuals to particular types of cancer; this is one of the reasons why ...
    Related: york macmillan, york harper, health care, specificity, bias
  • Bruce Goffs Bavinger House - 2,743 words
    ... y thing to keep happening, to keep things vital and alive. So if we stop to think about it, even if we start a composition, or building, or piece of music, or whatever we are doing, you might say, we are tuning in instead of starting, because it has taken us all our lives, and many other people's lives before us, to be part of a continuing thing, before we are able to continue through into this composition. So we really don't start it when we start the composition; we don't really begin then, we begin again and again, as Gertrude Stein says. We have to think of it as something continuous and something growing; something becoming, always becoming. Goff believed that the sense of surprise ...
    Related: bruce, year award, organic architecture, american institute, genius
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