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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: blacks

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  • After The Reconstruction Years, Blacks And Whites Often Rode Together In The Same Railway Cars, Ate In The Same Restaurants, - 1,531 words
    After the Reconstruction years, blacks and whites often rode together in the same railway cars, ate in the same restaurants, used the same public facilities, but did not often interact as equals. The emergence of large black communities in urban areas and of significant black labor force in factories presented a new challenge to white Southerners. They could not control these new communities in the same informal ways they had been able to control rural blacks, which were more directly dependent on white landowners and merchants than their urban counterparts. In the city, blacks and whites were in more direct competition than they had been in the countryside. There was more danger of social m ...
    Related: blacks, railway, reconstruction, reconstruction period, white supremacy
  • Changes Of Time: The Stereotypical Images Of Blacks On Television - 1,810 words
    Changes of Time: The Stereotypical Images of Blacks on Television Ever since television began in 1939, African Americans have been portrayed as maids, servants or clowns. These negative perceptions started to appear in sitcoms such as in Amos and Andy, who were the stereotypical backs who never took things seriously. All those views changed during the 1970s when black sitcoms were becoming more reality based. Although blacks have been, and often still, portrayed in a negative way on TV, there has been some improvement of stereotypical images of African Americans on television. There were five stereotypical roles of blacks between 1940-1970; the Tom, Coon, Mammie, Tragic Mulatto, and the Buck ...
    Related: black family, blacks, stereotypical, television, lower class
  • Malcolm X, A Civil Rights Leader In The 1960s Believed That Blacks And Whites Should Be Segregated He Also Believed - 1,399 words
    Malcolm X, a civil rights leader in the 1960's believed that blacks and whites should be segregated. He also believed that white man was evil and were trying to brainwash all blacks and that Martin Luther King's non-violent protests weren't working and that violence was needed for change. Malcolm X's life was a life with a lot of conflict and violence in it. Malcolm X was born under the name of Malcolm Little in Omaha, Nebraska in 1925. His father was a baptist minister and an outspoken follower of Marcus Garvey, the black nationalist leader of the 1920s who preached that all blacks should leave the US and go back to Africa. While Malcolm's father was away and Malcolm's mother was pregnant w ...
    Related: black nationalist, blacks, civil rights, civil rights movement, malcolm, malcolm little, malcolm x
  • Status Of Blacks In The Unites States - 1,915 words
    Status Of Blacks In The Unites States Less than Equal The initial Status of Blacks in the Unites States Chanel Frampton Government Period 3 December 18, 2000 Less than Equal The initial status of blacks in the United States For much of black America life seems suspended. In the bleakness of filth and of the inner cities our people go through motions of living. On the street corners jobless men still wait, among the garbage and rats children still play. There are some features to the scene City blocks are ravaged by the riot, the bums and blocked buildings, the empty lots still stand like silent witnesses to their futile anger(Lusane C ,1994, p.135). Historically African American have endured ...
    Related: black america, black community, black people, blacks, economic status
  • The Book Cry, The Beloved Country By Alan Paton Is A Book About Agitation And Turmoil Of Both Whites And Blacks Over The Whit - 1,805 words
    The book Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton is a book about agitation and turmoil of both whites and blacks over the white segregation policy called apartheid. The book describes how understanding between whites and blacks can end mutual fear and aggresion, and bring reform and hope to a small community of Ndotcheni as well as to South Africa as a whole. The language of the book reflects the Bible; furthermore, several characters and episodes are reminiscent of stories from the New Testament and teachings of Christ. Thus, Alan Paton, as a reformer and the author of Cry, the Beloved Country, gives the people of South Africa a new, modern Bible, where he, like Christ, teaches to love thy b ...
    Related: alan, alan paton, beloved, beloved country, black community, blacks, cry the beloved country
  • The Contributions Of Blacks To The Arts - 556 words
    The Contributions Of Blacks To The Arts The Contibutions of Black Americans to the Arts Without a continuous bond uniting men, without a continuous current of shared thought, there could be no living worthy of being called human. Richard Wright spoke these words in his autobiography Black Boy. He, as well as many other black Americans have displayed exmplemtory talent in the arts. As a matter of fact, blacks have contributed their talents to the arts, for many years, especially in the areas of painting, literature, and music Many people are unaware of the contributions black people have made to the art of painting. Painters such as Benny Andrews and Jacob Lawerence have expressed the pain ...
    Related: arts, black boy, black people, blacks, performing arts
  • The People, Leisure, And Cultures Of Blacks During The Harlem Renaissance - 2,481 words
    The People, Leisure, And Cultures Of Blacks During The Harlem Renaissance The People, Leisure, and Culture of Blacks During the Harlem Renaissance It seems unfair that the pages of our history books or even the lecturers in majority of classrooms speak very little of the accomplishments of blacks. They speak very little of a period within black history in which many of the greatest musicians, writers, painters, and influential paragon' emerged. This significant period in time was known as the Harlem Renaissance. Blacks attained the opportunity to work at upper-class jobs, own their own homes, and establish status among themselves. To no ones surprise, they still were not accepted into the so ...
    Related: black african, black american, black experience, black history, black music, black nationalist, black people
  • The People, Leisure, And Cultures Of Blacks During The Harlem Renaissance - 2,599 words
    ... ed Claude McKay, Harlem was the first positive reaction that most Blacks saw to American Life. It was compared to a paradise filled with beautiful, strong joyous, Black people that were enjoying life. He worked several jobs in Harlem but he continuously ceased to observe the greatness of his people, in turn taking out the time to write poetry expressing all that he was witnessing every spare chance he got. Langston Hughes, one of the most extraordinary writers of all time, wrote as a young Negro artist, for himself and the other Negro artists, that this was their time to express the uniqueness of their individuality of their dark- skinned selves without feeling anything but pride and acc ...
    Related: black community, black history, black people, black race, black woman, black women, blacks
  • 1968 Life - 1,242 words
    1968 Life Analysis of Life for 1968 The year 1968 was a time of war, civil rights movements, and riots. Many big events took place during 1968. Many lives were changed by these events. Out if the 1960s, 1968 stands out the most. In January of 1968 the United States thought that the Vietnam War was coming to a close, but President Johnson made a statement that changed the direction of Vietnam. President Johnson said the South Vietnamese could not win. This caused the South Vietnamese could not win. This caused the South Vietnamese to launch the Tet Offensive. This shocked the United States, and caused the war to linger on for several more years. The Tet Offensive spread from the cities of Mek ...
    Related: life magazine, thornton wilder, popular music, summer olympics, entertainment
  • 65279 The Life And Works Of James Weldon Johnson - 1,420 words
    THE LIFE AND WORKS OF JAMES WELDON JOHNSON James Weldon Johnson was a writer, diplomat, professor, and editor,who also described himself as a man of letters and a civil rights leader. Even though, he is no longer living, James Weldon Johnson has left much abouthis contributions to African American literature. Johnson was born June 17,1871 in Jacksonville, Florida to James and Helen Louise (Dallied) Johnson. Johnsons father, James Johnson, was born a freeman and was of mixed ancestry. He was a headwaiter in St. James Hotel. Mr. Johnson taughthis son how to speak Spanish as a young boy. Johnsons mother, Helen Johnson, was born a free woman in the West Indies. Mrs. Helen was awoman of French an ...
    Related: james weldon johnson, johnson, weldon, weldon johnson, works cited
  • A Birth Of A Nation The Bicycle Thieves - 1,300 words
    A Birth Of A Nation - The Bicycle Thieves In that paper, I will try to compare two films which are A Birth of a Nation directed by D.W.Griffith and The Bicycle Thieves directed by De Sica. After giving the story of the films, I will try to explain their technical features and their similarities. A Birth of a Nation by D. W. Griffith Griffith can be seen as the first 'modern' director, his greatest achievements being the historical epics The Birth Of A Nation. When it was released, it was one of the longest films ever made, over three hours in length. The prologue depicts the introduction of slavery to America in the seventeenth century and the beginnings of the abolitionist movement. The maj ...
    Related: bicycle, thieves, civil rights, ku klux klan, sequence
  • A Boy Of Scotchirish Descent, Whose Ancestors Had Settled In Pennsylvania Before Travelling Through Mountains To Resettle In - 530 words
    A boy of Scotch-Irish descent, whose ancestors had settled in Pennsylvania before travelling through mountains to resettle in southern territory, he was born in 1782 in the Abbeville district of South Carolina on March 18. His family was not rich, nor were they poor; they owned slaves and were regarded not as a part of the ostentation associated with slave-holding at the time but rather as a simple, farm family. His father had an interest in politics and participated locally, something that ultimately catapulted this boy into his future profession. Sent at the age of 12 to live with a Presbyterian minister for a basic education, he was eventually trained at Yale beginning his junior year and ...
    Related: ancestors, mountains, pennsylvania, travelling, fundamental principles
  • A Description Of The Six Principle Of Nonviolence - 565 words
    A Description of the Six Principle of Nonviolence Martin Luther King Junior, an icon in the civil rights movement, stood for six main principles of nonviolence. The six principles were the guideline and the key to his success in making substantial improvements in the world of segregation and public prejudice. Martin Luther King Junior believed that nonviolence: was a way of life for courageous people, sought way to win friendship and understanding, sought a way to defeat prejudice and not people, held that suffering could educate and transform, chose live instead of hate, and believed that the universe was on the side of fate. These principles will be glanced at in the following paragraphs. ...
    Related: nonviolence, martin luther, rights movement, martin luther king junior, push
  • A Dream Deferred - 898 words
    A Dream Deferred A Dream Deferred What happens to a dream deferred? (a) Does it dry up (b) like a raisin in the sun? (c) Or fester like a sore- (d) And then run? (c) Does it stink like rotten meat? (e) Or crust and sugar over- like a syrupy sweet? (e) Maybe it just sags (f) like a heavy load. (g) Or does it explode? (g) Born in Joplin, Missouri, James Langston Hughes (1902-1967) was born into an abolitionist family. As the grandson of James Mercer Langston, the first Black American to be elected to public office in 1855, Hughes attended Central High School in Cleveland, Ohio, but began writing poetry in the eighth grade, and was selected as Class Poet. His father didn't think he would be abl ...
    Related: deferred, dream, dream deferred, raisin in the sun, james langston hughes
  • A Gold Rush Leads To War - 1,304 words
    A Gold Rush Leads to War A Gold Rush Leads to War The American Civil War (1861-1865) and the Reconstruction period that followed were the bloodiest chapters of American history to date. Brother fought brother as the population was split along sectional lines. The issue of slavery divided the nation's people and the political parties that represented them in Washington. The tension which snapped the uneasy truce between north and south began building over slavery and statehood debates in California. In 1848, settlers discovered gold at Sutter's Mill, starting a mass migration. By 1849, California had enough citizens to apply for statehood. However, the debate over whether the large western st ...
    Related: gold rush, rush, senate race, democratic party, invalid
  • A Gold Rush Leads To War - 1,266 words
    ... and Britain gave up any serious hopes of a Confederate victory. With Britain's vote of confidence also went the possibility of European support for the Confederacy. Without this vital link with the outside world, the Confederacy lost all advantage in the war. Amidst all the turmoil of the Civil War, Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863, ending slavery in all territories, including the South, which Lincoln continued to insist was under Union jurisdiction. Recognition of the Proclamation became a required element of Lincoln's "ten-percent plan", whereby 10% of the population of any seceded state could reform the state government and apply for readmission ...
    Related: gold rush, rush, radical republicans, robert e lee, alabama
  • A Living Organization Changes With Time Some Parts Of It May Remain Identical To That Which Was First Constructed Most Parts - 1,785 words
    A living organization changes with time. Some parts of it may remain identical to that which was first constructed. Most parts will adapt to changes in the world, in society, and in mankind itself. If it does not change, it withers and dies. Organizations which fail to adapt to changes, whether they like it or not, tend to become shrunken relics of their original selves. They become mummified images of a once living creation. Such an organization is the Ku Klux Klan, better known as the KKK. The Ku Klux Klan is one of the most hateful groups that still exists today. They are not as strong as they once were, but still pose a threat. I believe that the KKK should have never been formed because ...
    Related: identical, north carolina, after world, small town, threatening
  • A Peoples History Of The United States Chapter Four Summary - 831 words
    A People's History Of The United States Chapter Four Summary As the British and Colonists were engaged in the Seven Years War against the French and Indians, the colonists were slowly building up feelings for their removal from under the British crown. There had been several uprisings to overthrow the colonial governments. When the war ended and the British were victorious, they declared the Proclamation of 1763 which stated that the land west of the Appalachians was to be reserved for the Native American population. The colonists were confused and outraged and the now ambitious social elite's were raring to direct that anger against the English since the French were no longer a threat. Howe ...
    Related: american history, history, peoples history, summary, native american
  • A Rose For Emily - 383 words
    A Rose For Emily Reading To Kill A Mockingbird and A Rose For Emily I noticed several differences and likenesses. I would like to convey my thoughts to you. Females in "A Rose For Emily" are depicted as reclusive, crazy, and nosy. Females in "To Kill A Mockingbird" are depicted as smart, outgoing, and full of pride. For example, Emily and Aunt Alexandra are both full of pride. Emily is so full of pride that when she finds out that Homer Barron is not going to marry her and that he is gay that she kills him. She lets the town think that they are married. When in fact she kills him. Emily is afraid of what the town will say about her. Aunt Alexandra is full of a different kind of pride. She is ...
    Related: a rose for emily, emily, rose for emily, to kill a mockingbird, homer barron
  • Abe Lincoln - 1,352 words
    Abe Lincoln Abraham Lincolns assassination was a malevolent ending to an already bitter and spiteful event in American history, the Civil War. John Wilkes Booth and his group of co-conspirators developed plans in the late summer of 1864 to only kidnap the President and take him the Confederate capital of Richmond and hold him in return for Confederate prisoners of war. Booths group of conspirators: Samuel Arnold, Michael OLaughlen, John Surratt, Lewis Paine, George Atzerodt, David Herold, and Mary Surratt (Johns wife), made plans on March 17, 1865, to capture Lincoln, who was scheduled to see a play at a hospital in the outskirts of Washington. However, Lincoln changed plans and remained in ...
    Related: abe lincoln, abraham lincoln, lincoln, president abraham lincoln, president lincoln
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