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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: wild west

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  • The Wild West - 986 words
    The Wild West THE OUTLAWS Born Robert Leroy Parker in Beaver, Utah, on Apr. 13, 1866, Cassidy was the oldest of 13 children and had no formal education. Cassidy became a cowboy while still in his teens when he met Mike Cassidy, adopting Cassidy's name after he joined him in rustling cattle in Utah and Colorado. Robert Clay Allison worked on his parents' farm near Waynesboro, Tenn., until he was twenty-one. Immediately upon the outbreak of the Civil War, he enlisted in the Confederate Army and went off willingly to fight for the South. He had a clubfoot that did not seem to hamper his ability to perform active duty. He saw action in several battles but was sent home in March 1862 to recuperat ...
    Related: wild west, first bank, formal education, northern california, republic
  • The Wild West - 1,017 words
    ... and fortune, he enlisted in the Third Colorado Cavalry under Colonel Chivington and was at the infamous Sand Creek Massacre. After the cavalry, Breakenridge became a train brakeman for the Southern Pacific Railroad and then a storekeeper in Sidney, Nebraska. In 1878, he moved to Phoenix, Arizona where he took the job as deputy Sheriff. He then moved to Tombstone and became deputy sheriff under Sheriff John Behan. During the late 19th Century no area in the United States was a haven and a refuge for criminals like the Indian Territory, pre-statehood Oklahoma. The jurisdiction of this territory fell to the United States court for Western Arkansas, located at Fort Smith, Arkansas. The cour ...
    Related: wild west, buffalo bill, pacific railroad, federal court, angelo
  • A Rough Man - 1,341 words
    A Rough Man Rough, vigorous, hot-tempered and rich is what Mark Twain grew up to be. Born 1835 in Missouri, Florida he always did what he needed to in order for him to reach his goal. Even though he dropped out of school at the age of twelve, when his father died, he accomplished numerous things. Mark began writing when he took the job of a journalist. The tale 'The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County' was his first success. After a trip by boat to Palestine, he wrote The Innocents Abroad. As his writing career blossomed, he also became successful as a lecturer. In 1870 got married, and a few years later he and his wife settled in Hartford, Connecticut. Huckleberry Finn is Twain's ma ...
    Related: rough, mysterious stranger, gilded age, point of view, imagination
  • Cambodia - 1,930 words
    ... hildren were underfed. Hundreds of thousands of children are orphans or have only one surviving parent. The crisis of poverty, affecting children and adults alike, makes lone-term planning difficult, or impossible. Because of insecurity and a shortage of revenue, the State of Cambodia has been unable to keep Cambodia's roads, bridges, and railway system in good repair. Trips that before 1970 took less than an hour from Phnom Penh by car, on well-paved roads, now take over three hours, on roads from which the paving has almost disappeared. Rapid Social Change A third theme is that for many Cambodians, as for millions of other people elsewhere in the 1990's, everything is changing so rapid ...
    Related: cambodia, theravada buddhism, dairy products, consumer goods, alike
  • Copland - 1,142 words
    Copland Aaron Copland wrote a ballet about one of the most famous western gangsters in history: Billy the Kid. The work was written in 1938 and remained popular for over a decade. Unfortunately, his works are no longer heard or performed often enough today. In my opinion, Copland is one of the greatest American performers in music history, but he is not given the recognition he deserves by today's society. By looking at Copland's works and analyzing his Billy the Kid, the necessary proof of his greatness will, without question, show the fact that he is one of the greatest American composers of all time. Aaron Copland, whose family name was changed from Kapland by immigration officials in New ...
    Related: copland, changing times, academy award, pulitzer prize, finale
  • Cowboys - 731 words
    Cowboys Cowboys How they started Cattle ranchers began to move out onto the Great Plains in the mid 1800s In the late 1800s cowboys became popular in the cattle industry. The American cowboys owe their knowledge of how to tame the cattle to vaquerars (the Mexican cowboys). The animals originally were from the ranches in southern Texas formerly operated by Spaniards and Mexicans. The cowboys often called the wild cattle longhorns, which were the huge herds of wild cattle. About one- third of the cowboys were free black men who had moved west after the Civil War. Each year Texas ranches would collect huge herds of cattle and start them northward on what was called the long drive. The cowboys w ...
    Related: brace jovanovich, drinking water, american nation, brown, bacon
  • Death In Stephen Cranes The Blue Hotel - 660 words
    Death In Stephen Cranes The Blue Hotel Stephen Crane is a well-known author of variety of short stories. He was born in Newark, New Jersey, the son of a Methodist minister. After schooling at Lafayette College and Syracuse University, he worked in New York as a freelance journalist. His short stories and experimental poetry, also, anticipate the ironic realism of the decades ahead. In his brief and energetic life, he published fourteen books while acting out, in his personal adventures, the legend of the writer as soldier of fortune (741-743). Among one of his works include The Blue Hotel. The novel the Blue Hotel is a novel themed with death. The moment that the Swede arrives at the Blue Ho ...
    Related: blue hotel, hotel, stephen, stephen crane, syracuse university
  • Deviance In Gangs - 1,719 words
    Deviance in Gangs Mark Sirignano 027-66-7577 Tues. Thur. 9:25-10:40 12-14-99 Deviance in Gang Involvement: Why Join a Gang? The problem of gang activity is not a new one facing our country. Ever since the beginnings of human existence gangs have served as a means of protection for humans. The issue of gang activity has recently, however, come to the forefront of dilemmas facing our nation. While cities like Chicago and Los Angeles are chronic gang sites, other cities such as "Miami, Portland, Columbus, Dallas, and Milwaukee have only recently (within the last decade) had what they termed as a gang problem" (Conly 7). Gang numbers have, without question, skyrocketed over the past 10 to 20 yea ...
    Related: deviance, dysfunctional family, broken homes, police officer, diverse
  • Gun Control - 980 words
    Gun Control Concealed Handguns The guy smiled at meand he began to move toward me with the knife. I thought, this guy is willing to kill me for thirty-five dollars. I aimed the automatic at the outer edge of his left thigh and shot himI remember thinking, shouldnt I call a doctor? And then I thought, would he have called a doctor for me? And I kept right on walking(Would 162). Events such as the one depicted in this story occur all to often on our city streets. The fact that some people will kill for thirty-five dollars has many people in this country searching for a legal source of protection. Through a concealed handgun license innocent people can often walk away from potentially violent c ...
    Related: gun control, state government, good thing, national crime, illness
  • Independent Study Project On Role Playing Games - 1,976 words
    ... ed, run of the mill manner. In this way, humans speaking and creating the game as they go along make up essentially what the role playing games are based on: People ROLE PLAYING. Computers can't role play with the human factor of decisions and such things as cunning, wisdom, and even intelligence. Computers see one things-garbage in, garbage out. Information goes in, its processed, and is fed back to the user. Humans can also process information, but in such ways that computers cannot. By 1980, the only role playing game available was the original Dungeons and Dragons game, set in the stereo-typical medieval England. But there was one MAJOR influencing factor in the evolution of new RPG' ...
    Related: playing games, role playing, human factor, comic book, laser
  • Mel Brooks As Jewish Comedian - 2,211 words
    Mel Brooks As Jewish Comedian Mel Brooks's membership in the elite club of Jewish comedians is essentially impossible to dispute. The question is whether or not his comedy is atypical. Satirizing Jewish history and klutzy old Jewish men is normal for Jewish comedy. However, "Don't be stupid, be a smarty, come and join the Nazi party," is something that you would not expect to hear in typical Jewish comedy (The Producers). Defined broadly, there are two forms which Mel Brooks's Jewish humor takes. The first form is to discuss specifically Jewish topics in a funny way. This is evident in The Producers and in the Inquisition scene from History of the World, Part I. The other form is to use cert ...
    Related: comedian, jewish, jewish history, jewish tradition, spanish inquisition
  • My Antonia - 833 words
    My Antonia William Cather showed a great amount of information about the "old wild west" and the expansion of the United States. In My Antonia, Jim Burden told a story of his childhood, the people in his life, and the struggles he and his surroundings faced during this time. At age ten, Jim Burden was sent by his relatives to be raised by his grandparents in the Nebraska prairie after his parents died. When he arrived at his new home, he was introduced to a Bohemian family that just immigrated to America; the Shimerdas. Jim and Antonia, the Shimerda's daughter, quickly become friends. They traveled a great distance to meet each other. As immigrants, the Shimerdas were not very wealthy and ge ...
    Related: antonia, my antonia, foreign countries, mrs. shimerda, finish
  • Privacy - 530 words
    Privacy A person has a right to solitude and freedom from prying public eyes, in other words, to privacy. The definition of privacy in the Webster's Dictionary is defined as isolation, seclusion, or freedom from unauthorized oversight or observation. In the essay The Price of Admission: Harassment and Free Speech in the Wild Wild West, Stephanie Brail discusses how online harassment has become a media headliner in the last few years. There are many reasons to hide your real identity when you use the Internet. You might want to protect yourself against an oppressive government, or post personal messages to a Usenet newsgroup without identifying yourself to the whole world as the poster. Altho ...
    Related: personal privacy, privacy, wild west, free speech, software
  • Public Lands System - 981 words
    Public Lands System The government has control of over one-third of the nation's land, and 398 million acres of that is controlled by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM 6). This land hold a wide diversity of resources, from timber, and grazing lands found on the surface to a mass of oil, natural gas, and minerals laying below the earth. The history of these lands is hardly a dull story, because it is the story of the taming of the "Wild West". Should the BLM though, still be controlling these lands under the same laws that where put in affect to establish the "Western Frontier." I feel that a radical reevaluation of these laws needs to take place, in order to adapt them to the changing demog ...
    Related: land management, public land, technological environment, water quality, toxic
  • Religion As A Captor - 1,514 words
    Religion As A Captor A collection of short stories published in 1907, Dubliners, by James Joyce, revolves around the everyday lives of ordinary citizens in Dublin, Ireland (Freidrich 166). According to Joyce himself, his intention was to "write a chapter of the moral history of [his] country and [he] chose Dublin for the scene because the city seemed to [b]e the centre of paralysis" (Friedrich 166). True to his goal, each of the fifteen stories are tales of disappointment, darkness, captivity, frustration, and flaw. The book is divided into four sections: childhood, adolescence, maturity, and public life (Levin 159). The structure of the book shows that gradually, citizens become trapped in ...
    Related: religion, middle class, an encounter, literary criticism, romance
  • Roosevelt, Theodore 18581919, 26th President Of The United States 190109, The First President To Exploit The Public Dimension - 1,719 words
    Roosevelt, Theodore (1858-1919), 26th president of the United States (1901-09), the first president to exploit the public dimensions of his office in an age of mass communications, a reform leader at home and a skilled diplomat abroad. In his lifetime Roosevelt became a personal model, particularly for the country's youth, in a way that no public figure has matched. He was one of the most popular presidents in American history. The son of a wealthy, socially prominent merchant, Roosevelt was born in New York City on October 27, 1858. He was educated by private tutors and studied at Harvard University, graduating in 1880 as a member of Phi Beta Kappa and the most prestigious social clubs. Ill ...
    Related: dimension, exploit, first president, state assembly, theodore, theodore roosevelt, vice president
  • Spaghetti Westerns - 1,356 words
    Spaghetti Westerns Which is the cheesiest? The answer is pretty obvious, but lets take a close look. "Spaghetti Westerns," as their called, are a genre of western films, that have been created or filmed in Italy and are meant to portray the "Wild West" of America. "Macaroni Westerns," as Ill call them, make up the traditional western genre, made in the United States. Lets take a look at the similarities and differences of these genres, and at two films in particular that represent each genre; The Good the Bad and the Ugly(1966) and Rio Bravo(1959), which most critics will agree, are great examples of each genre. Lets start with the most obvious aspect that differs in the two genres. "Macaron ...
    Related: wild west, major differences, good idea, wayne, marshal
  • The North American Frontier Contributed Greatly To Todays - 1,392 words
    The North American frontier contributed greatly to today's American culture. For nearly 150 years before independence, the Appalachian mountain range had been the American frontier, separating civilization from wilderness. When North America gained independence and became the United States, however, people began to move more freely across the frontiers, into the unknown. The land belonged to them now, and they were free to explore it however deeply they chose claiming at will what land they saw. One can explain American development as the existence of a large area of free land constantly receding, and American settlement advancing westward. The difference in American institutions from those ...
    Related: american, american culture, american development, american economy, american frontier, american life, american psychology
  • The Ode To The West Wind By Percy Bysshee Shelley - 900 words
    The Ode To The West Wind By Percy Bysshee Shelley The Ode of Imagery The Ode to the West Wind, by Percy Bysshee Shelley, is a poem of spiritual power. The power is demonstrated through the use of visual, auditory, and kinetic (motion) imagery. The poem was written on a day that the "tempestuous wind, whose temperature is at once mild and animating, was collecting the vapors which pour down the autumns rains [Shelly's notes]." The poem uses terza rima to portray a very rhythmic rhyming pattern. This pattern is used to describe five very distinct and different stanzas, which describe: autumn, rainstorms, the sea, man merging with the wind, and man being the sound of the wind. Shelley uses thre ...
    Related: percy, shelley, west wind, wild west, wind
  • The Old West Has Been Portrayed Truly And Falsely Through Art, Music, And Literature From - 387 words
    The old west has been portrayed truly and falsely through art, music, and literature from the late 1800s and early 1900s up till this day when illustrated through movies. Artistic expression and communication presented the realities and illusions of the old west, some of which attracted various people there, while keeping others at home. Beginning with art, one of the main painters of these years (1860-1900) was Frederick Remmington. He painted over 2,700 pictures of the frontier. One example is Stamped by lighting. He also painted the Calvary charge on the southern planes. Remmington portrayed the west truthfully. For example, He didnt paint the Indians as savages, but as people. Another ar ...
    Related: falsely, literature, wild west, thomas cole, mark twain
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