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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: weimar

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  • Collapse Of The Weimar Republic - 1,441 words
    Collapse Of The Weimar Republic "On 2 August 1934, President Hindenburg died. Within an hour of his death Hitler announced that the offices of chancellor and president were to be combined and that he was the new head of state. Hitler's adolescent dream of becoming Fuhrer of the German people had been realized" President Hindenburg's death marked the official end of the Weimar Republic, a democratic 'experiment' that had lasted since 1918. The causes of the dissolution of the Republic are wide ranging and numerous, as was explained in the articles of both Richard Bessel, and John McKenzie. The two author's agree on the sequence of events which led to the dissolution of the Republic, however, ...
    Related: collapse, republic, weimar, weimar germany, weimar republic
  • Weimar Republic - 1,211 words
    Weimar Republic Weimar Republic There were various factors that contributed to the failure of the Weimar Republic of Germany and the ascent of Hitler's National Socialist German Workers Party into power on January 30, 1933. Various conflicting problems were concurrent with the result of a Republic that, from the outset, its first governing body the socialist party (SPD) was forced to contend with. These included the aspect of German imperialism, the unresolved defeat of 1918, financial collapse and the forced struggle against the activities of the National party as well as inflation. Other factors that influenced the failure of Weimar were the structural weaknesses induced by the constitutio ...
    Related: republic, weimar, weimar republic, treaty of versailles, extremist groups
  • Weimar Republic - 1,522 words
    Weimar Republic A path to a dead end: the Weimar Republics inevitable failure and the rise of Hitler to power. There were various factors that contributed to the failure of the Weimar Republic of Germany and the ascent of Hitlers National Socialist German Workers Party into power on January 30, 1933. Various conflicting problems were concurrent with the eventuation of the Republic that, from the outset, its first governing body the socialist party (SPD) was forced to contend with. These included the aspect of German imperialism, the unresolved defeat of 1918, financial collapse and the forced struggle against the activities of the National party as well as inflation. Other factors which infl ...
    Related: republic, weimar, weimar republic, socialist party, german people
  • Weimar Republic - 1,521 words
    ... exchange may have had a somewhat subtle effect in Germany. However, as said earlier, Germanys prosperity was merely financed by international loans and was excessively reliant on foreign investment. Correspondingly, Germany was thus forced to remain in a very vulnerable position, the results leading to the onset of depression and the virtual crumbling of the Republics very foundations in recourse to the Wall Street crash during the end of 1929. The depression that hit Germany in 1929, is said to have been the most severe economic depression in modern world history. It devastated the lives of the urban population as well as those living in the country districts who in recourse to the eco ...
    Related: republic, weimar, weimar republic, world history, national assembly
  • Adolf Hitler - 1,428 words
    Adolf Hitler Adolf Hitler Adolf Hitler was born on April 20th, 1889 in Braunau, Austria. He was the fourth child of Alois Schickelgruber and Klara Hitler. The couples first three offsprings died as children, but more two more were born later, in addition to Adolfs half siblings from his fathers previous marriage. A housemaid described Adolfs father as a strict but comfortable man, and his mother was known to give Adolf much love and affection. As a child, Adolf was very skilled at artwork, and even went to a special school for awhile, but he didnt do well there. His father died in 1903 of a pleural hemorrhage, and his mother died in 1907 of breast cancer. Hitler spent six years in Vienna, Au ...
    Related: adolf, adolf hitler, hitler, nazi party, jewish faith
  • Adolf Hitler - 1,333 words
    Adolf Hitler Weimar and the Rise of Hitler After World War I the allies intended to permanently cripple Germany. Through the Versailles Treaty they would do this. The document stole Germanys nationalism, pride, and power. It left Germany helpless and lost. Many believed that Germany had been absolutely exploited and cheated under the terms of the treaty. At the time nobody knew, but the Versailles Treaty would be the very seeds of the next world war. The end of World War I shocked many people. Most of these people were the citizens of Germany. The German army intended to deliver the German Offensive of 1918, this final attack would guarantee German victory. The government then pushed the Ger ...
    Related: adolf, adolf hitler, hitler, human sexuality, nazi party
  • Adolf Hitler - 1,456 words
    Adolf Hitler Hitler, Adolf (1889-1945) Founder and leader of Nazi Party, Head of State and Commander of the Armed Forces, Adolf Hitler was born in Austria on April 20, 1889. Hitler was born to Austrian customs officials, Alois Schickelgruber Hitler, and his third wife, Klara Poelzl, both from Austria. Hitler was a resentful and discontent child who was moody, lazy, and having a short temper. As a young man Hitler was very hostile towards his father and strongly attached to his mother, whose death from cancer in December of 1908 really had a big impact on his life. After spending about four years in the Realschule in Linz, he dropped out at sixteen years of age with intentions on becoming a p ...
    Related: adolf, adolf hitler, hitler, nazi party, weimar republic
  • Adolf Hitler - 1,286 words
    Adolf Hitler ADOLF HITLER Rob Moffitt Mrs. Flinn CP Enlish 10 April 16, 2000 1. Hitlers Early Life 2. Hitlers World War I Service 3. Free Corps 4. Weimar Republic 5. German Workers Party 6. Munich Putsch 7. Mein Kampf 8. Hitlers Rise to Power 9. Hitler Launches the War 10. Hitlers Last Days The interesting life of Adolf Hitler is not fully known to people. Adolf Hitler was born on April 20, 1889, the fourth child of Alois Schickelgruber and Klara Hitler in the Austrian town of Braunau. Two of his siblings died from diphtheria when they were children, and one died shortly after birth. Alois was a customs official, illegitimate by birth, which was described by his housemaid as a very strict bu ...
    Related: adolf, adolf hitler, hitler, franz ferdinand, early life
  • Adolf Hitler - 1,265 words
    ... s of Zion were published in the local anti-Semitic newspaper. The false, but alarming accusations reinforced Hitler's anti-Semitism. Soon after, treatment of the Jews was a major theme of Hitler's orations, and the increasing scapegoating of the Jews for inflation, political instability, unemployment, and the humiliation in the war, found a willing audience. Jews were tied to internationalism by Hitler. The name of the party was changed to the National Socialist German Worker's party, and the red flag with the swastika was adopted as the party symbol. A local newspaper which appealed to anti-Semites was on the verge of bankruptcy, and Hitler raised funds to purchase it for the party. In ...
    Related: adolf, adolf hitler, hitler, benito mussolini, soviet union
  • Alchemy - 1,850 words
    ... e of Hermetic theory and the consciousness in the alchemical mind that what might with success be applied to nature could also be applied to man with similar results. Says Mr. Waite, "The gold of the philosopher is not a metal, on the other hand, man is a being who possesses within himself the seeds of a perfection which he has never realized, and that he therefore corresponds to those metals which the Hermetic theory supposes to be capable of developing the latent possibilities in the subject man." At the same time, it must be admitted that the cryptic character of alchemical language was probably occasioned by a fear on the part of the alchemical mystic that he might lay himself open t ...
    Related: alchemy, first half, chemical analysis, modern science, appeal
  • April Robinson - 1,218 words
    April Robinson Dr. Robbins Exposition & Report Writing 620:015 21 February 2000 Bach: Life and Music He was a musical genius with thousands of musical compositions written in his lifetime. He spent his life in Germany, primarily Leipzig, and worked at a school for the city. He is considered to be one of the greatest musical composers, and composed till the day he died. An unruly youth who greatly disliked authority, he had a strong will and mind of his own. Well liked with many friends, yet no one really knew his inner workings, or how he thought. Of the thousands of musical pieces he composed, few were published in his life. This was a man who composed in great numbers, had reasons for doin ...
    Related: robinson, johann sebastian bach, young woman, article published, lenient
  • Bach, John Sebastian - 671 words
    Bach, John Sebastian Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) Johann Sebastian Bach is probally one of the greatest composers of his time, as well as our time. As a boy he had a fantastic soprano singing voice and always took the lead roles in the church and school choirs. He started composing fairly early on in his life and his first main works, including the Preludes and Variations for the organ, were composed between the ages of 17 and 20. Bach loved church music and was regarded as one of the finest organists of his day. Since he was raised up with strong ties to the church, he was always involved in church music both as a singer and an organist. He wrote many of his marvelous series of cantata ...
    Related: johann sebastian bach, sebastian, sebastian bach, chamber music, church music
  • By 1932 The Collapse Of Weimars Had Become Inevitable, Hitlers Triumph Had Not Discuss - 1,573 words
    ''By 1932 the collapse of Weimars had become inevitable, Hitlers triumph had not'' Discuss Without wanting to delve into the 'What if?' school of history, the debate about Weimars failure can become a vague one since there is so much known about the period and so many factors which could have effected the outcome of Weimars history. Some argue its collapse was inevitable in 1919 others go right up to 1933, but what is not certain was Hitler's triumph I would argue that after the signing of the Treaty of Versailles the collapse of Weimar was almost inevitable. From the very beginning it was extremely hindered economically by the treaty, and this caused problems with inflation, industry, emplo ...
    Related: collapse, triumph, weimar republic, foreign policy, treaty of versailles
  • Fascist Germany - 1,957 words
    Fascist Germany The 1930s were turbulent times in Germany's history. World War I had left the country in shambles and, as if that weren't enough, the people of Germany had been humiliated and stripped of their pride and dignity by the Allies. Germany's dream of becoming one of the strongest nations in the world no longer seemed to be a possibility and this caused resentment among the German people. It was clear that Germany needed some type of motivation to get itself back on its feet and this came in the form of a charismatic man, Adolf Hitler. Hitler, a man who knew what he wanted and would do anything to get it, single-handedly transformed a weary Germany into a deadly fascist state. In o ...
    Related: fascist, germany, treaty of versailles, economic crisis, instability
  • Fascist Germany The Result Of Instability - 1,967 words
    Fascist Germany The Result of Instability Fascist Germany The Result of Instability The 1930s were turbulent times in Germany's history. World War I had left the country in shambles and, as if that weren't enough, the people of Germany had been humiliated and stripped of their pride and dignity by the Allies. Germany's dream of becoming one of the strongest nations in the world no longer seemed to be a possibility and this caused resentment among the German people. It was clear that Germany needed some type of motivation to get itself back on its feet and this came in the form of a charismatic man, Adolf Hitler. Hitler, a man who knew what he wanted and would do anything to get it, single-ha ...
    Related: fascist, germany, instability, adolf hitler, civil rights
  • Friedrich Nietzche - 1,382 words
    Friedrich Nietzche Friedrich Nietzche was born in Rocken. He spent much of his time alone, reading the Bible. Nietzsches father died in 1849. The young man withdrew deeper into religion. Friedrich received a scholarship to Schulpforta, an elite prepatory school with only 200 students, in October 1858. The scholarship as intended to fund Nietzches training for the clergy. His mother, Franziska, and his young sister, Elizabeth, are dedicated to Friedrichs success, certain of his future. At the age of 18,Nietzsche lost his faith in traditional religion. His faith received a fatal blow when he found philosophy. In 1865 Nietzsche discovered Schopenhauers World as Will and Idea. The work forever c ...
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  • Hitler - 1,149 words
    Hitler Adolf Hitler On April 20, 1889, Klara and Alois gave birth to a son who would eventually become the man the world recognizes today as one of the most notorious men in history. Alois named his fourth son Adolf Hitler. His early childhood was spent under a cloud of normalcy in the small town of Braunau, Austria, a small town across the Inn River from Germany. His mother Klara was a meager housewife while his father a customs official. When Hitler was six his family moved to a place near Linz, Austria. Though Adolf received good marks in elementary school, he slacked severely in high school as his mind wandered to other areas besides academics. His ill-tempered father did not approve of ...
    Related: adolf hitler, hitler, vienna hitler, social democratic party, german politics
  • Hitler Youth - 1,943 words
    Hitler Youth Hitler Youth: The Future of Germany The Early Movement The Organization of the Hitler Youth Activities of the Hitler Youth Rival Youth Movements Hitler Youth In and After WWII Links The Hitler Youth (Hitlerjugend-HJ) were for Hitler the future of the Nazi party. Hitlers dream of a thousand year Reich could only be accomplished through the youth, which were deemed the most important aspect of Germany's future as a powerful nation. The future of the German nation depends on its youth, and the German youth shall have to be prepared for its future duties.(i) The youth were important because they would continue the Nazi legacy and spread propaganda to future generations. Hitler was s ...
    Related: hitler, hitler youth, german reich, world war i, xiii
  • Hitler Youth - 1,897 words
    ... if motors and automobiles were of interest, there was the Motor-HJ (the motor or mechanical Youth). The Marine-HJ (navy) and the Waffen-SS (weapons and protection squad) were branches for the more military-oriented youth. Signal, medical, and musical units were also options for the youth. (xviii) HJ calvary unit. Koch p. 164. HJ in river-crossing exercise. Koch p. 164 HJ building model gliders. Koch p. 164 If they did not join one of these detachments, but showed promise in leadership abilities, they could be chosen to join the SS instead of the army. The SS gave them opportunity to use violence and weapons, which they found extremely useful when dealing with Jews or other subhumans. Boy ...
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  • How Did Hitler Come Into Power - 1,657 words
    How Did Hitler Come Into Power? Cause and Effect: How did Hitler Come into Power? A dichotomy is a division of two entities into mutually exclusive or contradictory groups. In Viva Zapata, it was mentioned that its not the laws that govern men, but men that govern men. There is no dichotomy present here because the two arent mutually exclusive at all. A country is only as strong as those who lead it, and the laws that govern it. Without strong and enforced laws, man wouldnt have power. And without man, the laws wouldnt have power. But, the people govern the land, and they are by far more powerful than the laws. They can create and destroy laws. They are the ones who enforce the laws. People ...
    Related: hitler, market economy, emergency powers, after world, colby
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