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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: wartime

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  • Fdrs Wartime Diplomacy - 478 words
    Fdr's Wartime Diplomacy There were many successes and failures in Franklin Delano Roosevelt's wartime diplomacy. His policies were successful in that they led to the end of the war with Germany and Japan. However, they failed in that his actions led to an overall mistrust of Russia and Stalin and the postwar conflict that followed known as the Cold War. Roosevelt could see no way to prevent the Russians from dominating Europe. His 4 Policemen strategy would act as trustees for colonial societies not ready for full independence and that the great powers were the only ones who could "police" Europe after the war was over. FDR was determined that "something 'big' would come out of this war; a n ...
    Related: diplomacy, fdrs, wartime, delano roosevelt, soviet union
  • How Justified Were President Lincolns Wartime Decisions - 571 words
    How Justified Were President Lincolns Wartime Decisions? In a time of war, it is necessary for the President to enforce limits on the power of individuals. President Lincoln was entirely justified in limiting rights during the wartime situation to protect the nation. It was also necessary for him to increase the size of the federal army in order for the North to have any possibility of winning the war. Lincoln had to do all that he could to keep the Border States, each of which the Union could not afford to lose. Setting limits on the rights of individuals was unavoidable for President Lincoln, because Copperheads posed a significant threat to the Union. It is almost certain that the North w ...
    Related: justified, president lincoln, wartime, west virginia, america today
  • Wartime Propaganda: World War I - 1,740 words
    Wartime Propaganda: World War I Wartime Propaganda: World War I The Drift Towards War Lead this people into war, and they'll forget there was ever such a thing as tolerance. To fight, you must be brutal and ruthless, and the spirit of ruthless brutality will enter into the very fiber of national life, infecting the Congress, the courts, the policeman on the beat, the man in the street. It is one of history's great ironies that Woodrow Wilson, who was re- elected as a peace candidate in 1916, led America into the first world war. With the help of a propaganda apparatus that was unparalleled in world history, Wilson forged a nation of immigrants into a fighting whole. An examination of public ...
    Related: first world, old world, wartime, world history, world war i
  • Wartime Propaganda: World War I - 1,751 words
    ... enemy. So great are the psychological resistances to war in modern nations, wrote Lasswell that every war must appear to be a war of defense against a menacing, murderous aggressor. There must be no ambiguity about who the public is to hate. American propaganda was not the only source of anti-German feeling, but most historians agree that the CPI pamphlets went too far in portraying Germans as depraved, brutal aggressors. For example, in one CPI publication, Professor Vernon Kellogg asked will it be any wonder if, after the war, the people of the world, when they recognize any human being as a German, will shrink aside so that they may not touch him as he passes, or stoop for stones to ...
    Related: first world, modern world, wartime, world war i, american military
  • Buckley Jr - 2,713 words
    1. WM. F. BUCKLEY JR. Last summer WFB was asked by the New York Bar Association to make a statement to the panel of lawyers considering the drug question. He made the following statement: We are speaking of a plague that consumes an estimated $75 billion per year of public money, exacts an estimated $70 billion a year from consumers, is responsible for nearly 50 per cent of the million Americans who are today in jail, occupies an estimated 50 per cent of the trial time of our judiciary, and takes the time of 400,000 policemen--yet a plague for which no cure is at hand, nor in prospect. Perhaps you, ladies and gentlemen of the Bar, will understand it if I chronicle my own itinerary on the sub ...
    Related: buckley, illegal drug, medical care, federal government, princeton
  • A Separate Peace - 294 words
    A Separate Peace A Separate Peace is a remarkable story about the relationship between two young students, Gene and Phineas. Their friendship develops through the formation of secret societies and late night card games. A tragic event, at first glance an accident, changes their lives forever. As the story unfolds the friends have to deal with the fact that the unfortunate event was no accident. An extremely well written book, A Separate Peace is a wartime story about New Hampshire schoolboys as they approach maturity and learning how to handle adult responsibilities. The story begins with minor incidents among friends. As the plot becomes more complex the story takes on new meanings. A Separ ...
    Related: separate peace, main character, good and evil, late night, remarkable
  • A Separate Peace: Chapter 1 - 5,644 words
    ^^^^^^^^^^A SEPARATE PEACE: CHAPTER 1 Have you ever in your life gone through an experience so intense, so joyful, so painful, or just so important at the time, that you could only understand much later what truly happened? Isn't it a fact that when we're in the middle of an experience, we are often unable to think clearly about it because we're too busy feeling the moment's thrill or sadness to stop and come to sensible conclusions? Our high school years are just such a time: of quick growth and self-discovery, of forging as well as breaking friendships, of proving ourselves to others, in the classroom and on the sports field, and a time when we want very much to be individuals and to stick ...
    Related: separate peace, competitive edge, power over, john knowles, legs
  • A Separate Peace: Chapter 1 - 5,662 words
    ... truth, the shadowy, elusive truth of an instant that is already beginning to fade in memory. Gene is about to make a full confession--or he thinks he is--when Dr. Stanpole and the nurse arrive. The following day Finny is sent home to recuperate. The summer session comes to an end, appropriately enough for Gene, for until now summer had represented freedom, sports, and running outdoors, with Finny as the light and life of it all. Now all that has changed. A month later, after a sojourn at home, Gene heads back to school for his senior year. On the way he makes a detour to call on Finny. NOTE: The "surprise" reunion is no surprise to Finny, who appears to have been waiting anxiously in hop ...
    Related: separate peace, ultimate punishment, last time, self awareness, burning
  • Abagal Adams - 226 words
    Abagal Adams Abigail Adams I. Early Life A. Born on November 11, 1744 at Weymouth, Massachusetts 1. Family was of great prestige in the colony. 2. Her father was a Congregational minister, a leader in a society that held its clergy in high esteem. Smith was one of Weymouth's most prosperous and best-educated citizens. 3. Learned that it was the duty of the fortunate to help those who were less fortunate by her father. B. Lacked formal education but read avidly the books at hand. C. Married John Adams in 1764. 1. In 10 years she bore 3 sons and 2 daughters (Abigail, John Quincy, Charles, and Thomas). II. Accomplishments A. She became a trusted and influential political adviser to her husband. ...
    Related: abigail adams, charles francis adams, john adams, formal education, early life
  • Abraham Lincoln - 1,088 words
    ... in acceptance of the Republican senatorial nomination (June 16, 1858) Lincoln suggested that Douglas, Chief Justice Roger B. Taney, and Democratic presidents Franklin Pierce and James Buchanan had conspired to nationalize slavery. In the same speech he expressed the view that the nation would become either all slave or all free: "A house divided against itself cannot stand." The underdog in the senatorial campaign, Lincoln wished to share Douglas's fame by appearing with him in debates. Douglas agreed to seven debates: in Ottawa, Freeport, Jonesboro, Charleston, Galesburg, Quincy, and Alton, Ill. Lincoln knew that Douglas--now fighting the Democratic Buchanan administration over the cons ...
    Related: abraham, abraham lincoln, lincoln, second inaugural address, south carolina
  • Adolf Hitler And Mussolini - 1,132 words
    Adolf Hitler And Mussolini At the close of World War One tensions still rode high between countries, trade slowed and unemployment rose. A new form of government was also used, totalitarianism. This form of government means there is only one leader to make decisions and thus they killed or jailed all opponents. Mussolini and Hitler used this form of government after World War One to make their countries world powers. Although Hitlers Germany and Mussolinis Italy were both fascist their lives were extremely different. This is evident in their early life, wartime experiences, aims, how the came to power and how they ruled their respective nations. There was very little similarity between Hitle ...
    Related: adolf, adolf hitler, hitler, mussolini, addison wesley
  • Adventures Of Huck Finn And History - 1,350 words
    Adventures Of Huck Finn And History The world in which we live in now is much less oppressive than say the world lived in the middle of the 1800s. Up until the Civil War, the South depended on their peculiar institution of slavery, in order to be productive a successful. Most people believed slavery was not wrong, but those who thought otherwise seldom tried to alter it. In general if surrounded by oppressive environment, one does not usually try to make a difference in that world. This is because people are afraid to defend what is right against a whole mass of people who believe otherwise. Huck Finn in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Billy Budd in Billy Budd, and Frederick Douglass in ...
    Related: adventures of huckleberry finn, finn, history, huck, huck finn, huckleberry finn, the adventures of huckleberry finn
  • Alfred The Great - 1,744 words
    Alfred The Great King Alfred the Great King Alfred the Great was born at Wantage, in 849, on a royal manor of his father's holding, a family estate which long afterward he himself would leave in legacy to his wife. Alfred was the youngest of five children, four sons and a daughter, born to Ethelwulf by his wife Osburh. When Alfred was four years old, his father, the king, who by now had long despaired of getting to Rome in the present state of things, decided to send Alfred there, to at least receive the blessing of the Holy Father. The pope at the time, Leo the IV, gave Alfred the blessing to become king. Alfred's time came in the year mid-April 871, when King thelred died. Only a king of f ...
    Related: alfred, first great, present state, last year, preface
  • American Women During World War Ii - 1,808 words
    ... ing the war years for many men hoped that marriage would defer conscription to the war. This alone suggests that women's roles as wives and mothers were still dominant during the war because the nation witnessed a 25 percent rise in the population aged five and under. The popularity of marriage and the traditional gender roles that marriage carried, was exploited during the war. For example, the Office of War Information, established in the summer of 1942, worked closely with the media. President Roosevelt soon denied the OWI was being used for propaganda , yet only months after the OWI was formed, wartime propaganda began to likened women's war work to domestic chores. These trends serv ...
    Related: after world, american, american politicians, american propaganda, american society, american women, black women
  • American Women During Wwii - 1,832 words
    American Women During Wwii American Women During World War II. America's entry into World War II posed opportunities for American women domestically, yet paradoxically heightened fears in the polity about the exact role that women should adopt during wartime. A central issue that dominated women's lives during this period was how to combine the private sphere of the home, with the new demands of the war economy in the public sphere. Women made significant gains in the military, the war economy and in some cases, in terms of political influence. Yet these gains were misleading for policy makers utilised the female workforce for short-term gains during war, with a long-term goal of seeing wome ...
    Related: american, american society, american women, black women, employed women, married women, men and women
  • American Women During Wwii - 1,810 words
    ... during the war years for many men hoped that marriage would defer conscription to the war. This alone suggests that women's roles as wives and mothers were still dominant during the war because the nation witnessed a 25 percent rise in the population aged five and under. The popularity of marriage and the traditional gender roles that marriage carried, was exploited during the war. For example, the Office of War Information, established in the summer of 1942, worked closely with the media. President Roosevelt soon denied the OWI was being used for propaganda , yet only months after the OWI was formed, wartime propaganda began to likened women's war work to domestic chores. These trends ...
    Related: american, american history, american politicians, american propaganda, american society, american women, black women
  • An Oral History Of A Young Jewish Women In World War Ii - 1,229 words
    ... gardens. Similar to food rationing was the rationing of gasoline. We didn't have a car, but there was a card similar to the ration book, which would ration gas to each car a week. People were constantly finding tires and metal to contribute to the war effort. One of the greatest aspects of World War 2 was the unity of all the people of the United States. Everyone was united in helping to fight this war and having freedom reign over tyranny. Now a days people are spoiled, wasteful and all about themselves. During the war, another great aspect was the role of women in America. Before the war women were just seen as housewives, teachers, secretaries or any other stereotypical view of femal ...
    Related: american history, history, jewish, jewish women, oral, oral history, short history
  • Ancient Egyptian Medicine - 1,039 words
    Ancient Egyptian Medicine Ancient Egyptian Medicine The Nile river is known almost universally by historians as the cradle of medicine because it passes through the great region of Egypt. Egypt greatly contributed to the western civilization. Their knowledge was far superior to any previous civilization, and many civilizations to come. One of their greatest achievements was in the field of medicine because they replaced myth with medical fact, this laid the foundations for modern medical practice. They discovered the cause of various illnesses and developed a cure. They practiced both medical and spiritual healing so the worlds of religion and science could coexist. With the discoveries of s ...
    Related: ancient egypt, egyptian, medicine, family tradition, state court
  • Anna Freud - 921 words
    Anna Freud Elizabeth Young-Bruehl is a professor at Haverford College and a member of the Philadelphia Association for Psychoanalysis; this psychological background is very much evident in her writing. Young-Bruehl's obvious knowledge of psychoanalysis, often times made reading Anna Freud: a Biography difficult. For example, the book covered many of Anna Freud's theories and this being a biography and not a psychology textbook it was difficult to comprehend without previous knowledge of her theories. An entire chapter of the book dealt with the conflicting views Anna Freud and Melanie Klein had regarding the Oedipus complex. But I never caught on to what the different views were, so the impo ...
    Related: anna, anna freud, freud, sigmund freud, different views
  • Anne Frank - 376 words
    Anne Frank Otto Frank, Anne's father, was the only annex inhabitant who survived the war. When he returned to Amsterdam after the war, he was given Anne's notebooks and papers that the Gestapo left scattered on the floor of the Secret Annex. Among these papers was her diary. The first entry in Anne's diary is dated June 14, 1942, two days after her thirteenth birthday and three weeks before she and her family were to go into hiding. She wanted to confide completely in her diary, which she addressed as Kitty, she writes, because neither her friends nor her family seems sufficiently interested in understanding her deepest thoughts. The early entries show that Anne is a fairly typical, although ...
    Related: anne, anne frank, frank, otto frank, young girl
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