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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: war crimes

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  • Andersonville Prison - 222 words
    Andersonville Prison Andersonville Prison Andersonville prison opened on Feb. 24, 1864. It was the ideal prison. It's located in Sumpter County, Georgia. The prison was originally called Camp Sumpter. At first it was 16.5 acres then expanded to 26 acres. It was 1010' long and 780' wide, constructed of pine logs with thickness of a foot. A small creek ran through the middle, it was the only source of water. The prison caused many things like: misery, suffering, and death. It was only open for 14 months; from Feb. 1864 till May 1865. During that time,13,700 died in confinement. They died of various reasons like: tainted food, starvation, dirty water, filth, and diseases such as scurvy, gangren ...
    Related: american history, war crimes, dirty, historic
  • Atrocity And The American People - 818 words
    Atrocity And The American People An atrocity is defined as "An act of cruelty and violence inflicted by an enemy-armed force upon civilians or prisoners." Some believe this war in Kosovo is about politics. However, upon examination of the specifics of this conflict it is apparent that this is about religion. People must then decide whom, if anyone is committing these atrocities. Should the United States be involved in the dispute, and is it truly in the best interest of the American people? In the area once covered by the country of Yugoslavia, there has been a series of struggles for independence during the 1990's. These confrontations started in 1990 in Slovenia, 1991 in Croatia, and 1992 ...
    Related: american, american people, first amendment, kosovo liberation army, ethnic
  • Battle Of Britain - 1,295 words
    ... n their goals(Mosley 57). In the first 10 days the British suffered heavy loses because they flew in tight formations and had no room to move when they were under attack by the Germans. The RAF soon changed their strategy and began flying in Finger Four formation, which broke up the rigidity of the old formations and improved their odds against the Luftwaffe in air encounters(Mosley 86). Every day, during the months of June to October 1940, the RAF and Luftwaffe fought in the skies. The Luftwaffes final attempt to knock out the RAF began on Eagle Day, August 13,1940(Battle of Britain). Though the weather was stormy a flight of 74 Dronier bombers and 50 Me-110s headed towards RAF fields a ...
    Related: battle of britain, britain, adolf hitler, world war ii, walter
  • Battle Of The Bulge - 1,776 words
    Battle Of The Bulge The Battle of the Bulge The Ardennes offensive was a last ditch effort by the Germans to achieve an advantage in the war, but it turned out to be an acceleration of Germanys ultimate demise. Previous to the offensive the Allies had managed to achieve a beach head and advance toward Germany from almost every direction. On the eastern front Russia was steadily advancing on Berlin. The western front was around the Belgium and German border. Germanys fate seemed to be determined but Hitler would not let the thought of defeat enter his or his commands mind. He started planning for a massive offensive against the Allies on the western front. He believed that the relationship of ...
    Related: battle of the bulge, third army, general patton, fall apart, strike
  • Bright Shining Lie - 1,698 words
    Bright Shining Lie A Bright Lie Shining: John Paul Vann and America in Vietnam Neil Sheehan has used this novel to tell the story of the Vietnam conflict utilizing the perspective of one of its most respected characters. This is the story of John P. Vann who first came to Vietnam as a Lieutenant Colonel in the Army and later returned as a civilian official. It is the story of his life from the beginning to the end. It is also Vietnam's story; it offers clear reasons for the conflict, and why it was such a disaster for all those involved. Vann arrived in Vietnam on March 23, 1962 as part of the new U.S. Military Assistance Command Vietnam. He became a chief advisor to an ARVN infantry divisio ...
    Related: bright, shining, military officer, korean war, wwii
  • Causes Of World War I - 1,111 words
    Causes Of World War I On August 1, 1914 one of the worlds greatest tragedies took place. In Harry F. Youngs article entitled, the Misunderstanding of August 1, 1914, Young tries to make sense of the days that took place before the Great War began. In his twenty-one-page article, Young uses many sources to explain the story that had so many twists and turns. The following is an essay examining the work of Harry Young and what really went on August 1, 1914. The main question that the author asks is what happened on August 1st? Young opens his article by saying: Austria had opened fire on Serbia; Russia had begun to mobilize the troops; Berlins ultimatum to St. Petersburg would expire at noon; ...
    Related: first world, world war i, central powers, prime minister, assistance
  • Death Penalty - 711 words
    Death Penalty I believe the death penalty should be abolished. I believe it should be abolished because it does not help curb crime. Another reason is It is not morally fair or just. We cant be absolute in making sure people are guilty of the crime. It is more expensive than Imprisonment. The judgments are not completely impartial. I believe it is cruel and unusual punishment which is against the law. The death penalty does not help prevent crime. The murder rates in states with the death penalty are no lower than states without. The USA is the only Western democracy with the death penalty and we have the highest murder rate. Canadas murder rate fell the same year they abolished the death pe ...
    Related: death penalty, death row, penalty, united nations, central nervous
  • Embracing Defeat - 2,124 words
    ... s support, much like Ayatollah Khoemeni , the Pacific War was raised to the level of the Islamic jihad, or "holy war." While many within the states called for his indictment on war crimes, General MacArthur saw to it that his role in Japan's aggression was never really questioned. While it's certain that MacArthur exaggerated the difficulty that would encompass the removal of the emperor, his logic in keeping Hirohito in place was sound: with a familiar figurehead in place, Hirohito would be used as a new symbol of democracy and peace by the U.S. Separating from the state the Shinto religion, and ridding Japan of the imperial government, MacArthur would use Hirohito as a measure of contr ...
    Related: defeat, embracing, social change, military government, markets
  • Holocaust - 1,026 words
    ... s, socialists, liberals, trade unionists, dissident clergy, those who didn't fit in with the racial theories, mentally retarded, physically handicapped, emotionally disturbed Germans, Gypsies, and also Jehovah Witnesses. When the German Army captured Kiev, the capital of Ukraine, a number of German buildings were destroyed by the Soviet Secret Police. The Germans sought retaliation and the Jews of Kiev were targeted. An outdoor office was set up at the ravine Babi Yar, where the Jews waited to be "registered". The Jews were stripped of their clothes and valuables and were marched naked to the ravine. There they were shot. The killing continued for three days and three nights. Between the ...
    Related: holocaust, concentration camp, warsaw ghetto uprising, slave labor, customs
  • Human Rights - 1,393 words
    Human Rights On December tenth 1948 in the Palis de Chaillot in Paris, the United Nation's General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The document is made up of thirty articles which deal with a series of basic human rights and duties. It follows the premise that " the declaration is a common standard of achievement for all peoples and nations, to the end that every individual and every organ of society, keeping this declaration constantly in mind, shall strive by teaching and education to promote respect for these rights and freedoms and by progressive measures, national and international, to secure their universal and effective recognition and observance, both amon ...
    Related: cultural rights, human beings, human rights, individual rights, legal rights, universal declaration of human rights
  • Human Rights - 1,393 words
    Human Rights On December tenth 1948 in the Palis de Chaillot in Paris, the United Nation's General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The document is made up of thirty articles which deal with a series of basic human rights and duties. It follows the premise that " the declaration is a common standard of achievement for all peoples and nations, to the end that every individual and every organ of society, keeping this declaration constantly in mind, shall strive by teaching and education to promote respect for these rights and freedoms and by progressive measures, national and international, to secure their universal and effective recognition and observance, both amon ...
    Related: cultural rights, human beings, human rights, individual rights, legal rights, universal declaration of human rights
  • Human Rights - 1,393 words
    Human Rights On December tenth 1948 in the Palis de Chaillot in Paris, the United Nation's General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The document is made up of thirty articles which deal with a series of basic human rights and duties. It follows the premise that " the declaration is a common standard of achievement for all peoples and nations, to the end that every individual and every organ of society, keeping this declaration constantly in mind, shall strive by teaching and education to promote respect for these rights and freedoms and by progressive measures, national and international, to secure their universal and effective recognition and observance, both amon ...
    Related: cultural rights, human beings, human rights, individual rights, legal rights, universal declaration of human rights
  • Human Rights - 1,393 words
    Human Rights On December tenth 1948 in the Palis de Chaillot in Paris, the United Nation's General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The document is made up of thirty articles which deal with a series of basic human rights and duties. It follows the premise that " the declaration is a common standard of achievement for all peoples and nations, to the end that every individual and every organ of society, keeping this declaration constantly in mind, shall strive by teaching and education to promote respect for these rights and freedoms and by progressive measures, national and international, to secure their universal and effective recognition and observance, both amon ...
    Related: cultural rights, human beings, human rights, individual rights, legal rights, universal declaration of human rights
  • Indochina - 1,636 words
    Indochina Indochina is made up of Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam. It was colonized by the French in the late 1800's and given up in 1939. Japan tookover Frances loss after that. After Japans defeat in 1945, Vietnams patriot and communist, Ho Chi Minh and his Viet Minh declared Vietnam independent. After that, France came to claim their loss. The US supported France fearing the "Domino Theory" would take affect after in 1949 China fell to communism. In 1950, the US sent troops to South Korea to prevent the dominos from falling. The Vietnamese took fort Dien Bien Phoo in May of 1954, so then the French finally pulled out. That set up 2 nations North Vietnam and South Vietnam split at the 17th para ...
    Related: indochina, war crimes, south korea, vietnam war, catholic
  • Just War Theory - 1,854 words
    Just War Theory JUST WAR THEORY One of the perennial realities of human existence is war. From the earliest recorded events of human history all the way through to modern times, human communities have engaged in armed conflict as a method of dispute resolution. While war has been a constant part of the human experience, there has also been a tendency within virtually all human civilisations to limit the extent of war and the methods by which warfare may be conducted.(1) In Western civilisation, this limitation on warfare has taken shape as an effort to limit both the determination of when war is appropriate and the means used in battle.(2) Within the Western moral, legal, and political arena ...
    Related: moral theory, war crimes, human existence, modern times, flush
  • Just War Theory - 1,728 words
    ... the customary norms employed by Grotius to define the just war.(45) This recognition occurred as a result of attempts to resolve the so-called Caroline Incident.(46) The Caroline Incident occurred when the British attempted to prevent supplies from reaching Canadian rebels.(47) In their attempts to restrict the flow of material to the rebels, the British burned the U.S. ship Caroline and killed several U.S. citizens.(48) When the United States protested, the British government responded that its actions were justified as a matter of self-defence.(49) Webster responded by stating that the only way for the British claim to self-defence to stand was if it met the traditional elements of jus ...
    Related: legal theory, middle ages, war crimes, world war ii, document
  • Nuremberg Trials - 756 words
    Nuremberg Trials After World War II, numerous war-crimes trials tried and convicted many Axis leaders. Judges from Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States tried twenty-two Nazi leaders for: crimes against humanity (mostly about the Holocaust), violating long-established rules of war, and waging aggressive war. This was known as the Nuremberg Trials. Late in 1946, the German defendants were indicted and charged before a war crimes tribunal at Nuremberg(Shairo, 4). Twenty of the defendants were physicians who stood at or near the top of the medical authority of the Third Reich, as governmental, military, or SS officials. The others had executive positions, which brought ...
    Related: nuremberg, nuremberg trial, concentration camps, civil wars, persecution
  • Nuremberg Trials Martin Bormann - 1,105 words
    Nuremberg Trials - Martin Bormann On the night of October 15, 1946, ten of the twelve major war criminals, condemned to death at the Nuremberg trials, were executed. Of the two who eluded the hangman, one was ReichMarshal Hermann Goring, who committed suicide by swallowing a lethal vial of cyanide two hours before his execution. The other man was Reichsleiter Martin Bormann, who had managed to gain an enormous amount of power within the Nazi Party. He was virtually unknown outside of the Party elite as he had worked in the shadows of Hitler. As the end of the war drew near, many of the top Nazis were fleeing. Hermann Goring had fled west, and had been captured by American soldiers, after the ...
    Related: martin, nuremberg, nazi party, war crimes, humanity
  • Of All The Examples Of Injustice Against Humanity In History, The - 1,555 words
    Of all the examples of injustice against humanity in history, the Jewish Holocaust has to be one of the most prominent. In the period of 1933 to 1945, the Nazis waged a vicious war against Jews and other"lesser races". This war came to a head with the "Final Solution" in 1938. One of the end results of the Final Solution was the horrible concentration and death camps of Germany, Poland, and other parts of Nazi-controlled Europe. In the aftermath of the Holocaust, people around the world were shocked by final tallies of human losses, and the people responsible were punished for their inhuman acts. The Holocaust was a dark time in the history of the 20th century. One can trace the beginnings o ...
    Related: humanity, injustice, slave labor, modern history, nazi
  • Ordinary Men By Christopher Browning - 840 words
    Ordinary Men By Christopher Browning ORDINARY MEN by Christopher Browning Ordinary Men by Christopher Browning accounts for the actions of the German Order Police ( more specifically the actions of Reserve Police Battalion 101in Poland) and the role they played in the Second World War during the Jewish Holocaust. Police Battalion 101 was composed of veterans from World War One and men too old to be drafted into the regular forces: army, navy, air force. Browning himself is uncertain of the accuracy of information that he provides because he based his study on personal testimony recorded in postwar legal investigations. This also offers a biographical profile of a German unit that consisted o ...
    Related: browning, christopher, ordinary, second world, war crimes
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