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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: walter scott

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  • Ivanhoe By Walter Scott - 487 words
    Ivanhoe By Walter Scott While reading the book Ivanhoe by Sir Walter Scott I have come to the conclusion that Scott criticizes the church a lot. By some of the quotes by various characters show that he has some type of grudge towards the church. In the following paragraphs I will give several examples of his criticism. One example of the criticism of the church is when the Grand Master was talking at the trial. He said: "You are aware that we might well have refused this woman the benefit of the trail by combat; but, though a Jewess and an unbeliever, she is also a stranger and defenseless, and God forbid that she should ask the benefit of our mild laws and that should be refused to her" Thi ...
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  • The Lady Of The Lake By Sir Walter Scott 1771 1832 - 1,779 words
    The Lady of the Lake by Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832) The Lady of the Lake by Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832) Type of Work: Romantic metrical poem Setting Sixteenth-century Scotland Principal Characters James Douglas, outlawed uncle of the Earl of Angus Ellen Douglas, his daughter (The Lady of the Lake) Roderick Dhu, a rebel Highland chief of Clan Alpine, and protector of the Douglas's Allan-bane, the Douglas' minstrel and devoted servant James Fitz-James, a Saxon Lowlander Knight Malcolm Graeme, Ellen's young love Story Overveiw James Fitz-James, a Saxon knight from Stirling Castle, became lost as he hunted in the Highlands. Sounding his horn, he was rescued - not by his comrades, but by El ...
    Related: fair lady, lake, scott, sir walter scott, walter, walter scott
  • Adventures - 1,781 words
    Adventures Of Huck Finn Critics Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Twain told the truth in great novels and memoirs and short stories and essays, and he became a writer of international renown still translated into 72 languages. He became, through the written and spoken word, America's greatest ambassador and its most perpetually quoted. Samuel L. Clemens was born in 1835 in a town called Florida, Mo., and before he became a famous writer under the pen name Mark Twain, he worked on a riverboat, as a prospector for gold, as a reporter, and at other enterprises( Twain 12). He was not a young man of excellent reputation - a conclusion reached by Jervis Langdon, an Elmira businessman who had been as ...
    Related: adventures of huckleberry finn, the adventures of huckleberry finn, runaway slaves, samuel langhorne clemens, conformity
  • Adventures - 1,850 words
    ... oint. They gave Huck 40 dollars in gold, but put it on a piece of wood so that they would not have to expose themselves to the disease. The feud between the Granger fords and the Shaped sons is a venue for many of the themes in Huck Finn( Compton`s Encyclopedia).While everyone around her thought she was very gifted, her poems are amateurish and overly depressing. This is Twain's belief about the romantics in general. Twain ridicules the honor system that binds the two families to slaughter each other for an act that no one can remember. He points to their hypocrisy in commenting favorably on a sermon of brotherly love, with their guns in hand. This feud adds to Huck's distaste for societ ...
    Related: adventures of huckleberry finn, the adventures of huckleberry finn, luther king, southern society, mistaken
  • Araby By James Joyce - 400 words
    Araby By James Joyce Love at a young age is just an obsession. As children, our first relationships are object relationships. The people we like aren't people; they are objects of our obsession, and our obsessions are driven by vanity and narcissism. We are obsessed with what we consider an ideal, something we create. The main character in the short story "Araby" by James Joyce is a young boy that looks at every event in his life through narcissistic eyes. He thinks he is in love with a girl, but in reality, he is obsessed by his thoughts and his ideal. In the story, the boy lives in a home that once belonged to a priest that passed away. While looking around the house, the protagonist notic ...
    Related: araby, james joyce, joyce, walter scott, young boy
  • Coleridge And The Explosion Of Voice - 1,753 words
    Coleridge And The Explosion Of Voice Coleridge and the Explosion of Voice Coleridge is so often described in terms which are akin to the word, "explosive," and by all accounts he was at times an unusually dynamic,charismatic and unpredictable person. His writings themselves could also betermed "explosive" merely from their physical form; a fragmented mass, some pieces finished but most not, much of his writing subject to procrastination or eventual change of mind. Today I want to address a moment in his life which produced, as Richard Holmes has characterized it, an explosion of his poetic talent[1]--Autumn 1799, when he first met Sara Hutchinson, and wrote, amongst other poems, the ballad, ...
    Related: coleridge, explosion, oral tradition, sir walter scott, ashamed
  • Dostoyevsky And His Works - 1,433 words
    ... e Carlo Period 1 December 20, 1999 Often in novels, the life of an author is reflected in his or her literature. For a writer experience can serve not only as a teacher, but also as the foundation of a story line. Some of the most well known authors have used this Romana Clef technique, for example, Charles Dickens in his famous novel, David Copperfield. The Russian author, Fyodor Dostoyevsky does this as well, in his novel Crime and Punishment. Various individuals and occurrences from Dostoyevskys life influenced the novel and its characters and themes. This shows that an authors life serves as an inspiration to his or her writing and impacts the work as a whole. Dostoyevskys own family ...
    Related: dostoyevsky, fyodor dostoyevsky, literary works, charles dickens, real life
  • Frederick Douglass - 1,675 words
    ... reaker. This marked the first time Douglass worked as a field hand and the change from being an urban domestic slave was very hard for him. It was also the first time he was regularly whipped, the sores were kept open all the time by his coarse clothing. After a few long months of being worked to exhaustion and gruesome physical assaults Douglass was broken. My natural elasticity was crushed, my intellect languished, the disposition to read departed, the cheerful spark that lingered about my eye, died out.5 Even after this he still clung to thoughts of freedom and that is what kept him going. More and more Douglass realized the inhumanity of the religion of Christian slave holders. Once ...
    Related: frederick, frederick douglass, narrative of the life of frederick douglass, thomas auld, sir walter scott
  • Immigration Reform - 477 words
    Immigration Reform James Fenimore Cooper was born in Burlington, New Jersey on September 15, 1789. He was the eleventh of twelve children born to William and Elizabeth Cooper. When James was one year old the family moved to the frontier, and his father established the settlement of Cooperstown at the head of the Susquehanna River.Cooper attended a private preparatory school at Albany, New York, and was then admitted to Yale in 1803. He was expelled during his junior year because of a prank. His family allowed him to join the navy as a midshipman, but he soon found that more discipline was present in the Navy than at Yale. In 1810 Cooper took a furlough, and never returned to active duty. Coo ...
    Related: immigration, immigration reform, reform, walter scott, american life
  • Jane Austen: Background Of Her Novels - 1,236 words
    Jane Austen: Background of Her Novels First published in 1813, Pride and Prejudice has consistently been Jane Austen's most popular novel. It portrays life in the genteel rural society of the day, and tells of the initial misunderstandings and later mutual enlightenment between Elizabeth Bennet (whose liveliness and quick wit have often attracted readers) and the haughty Darcy. The title Pride and Prejudice refers (among other things) to the ways in which Elizabeth and Darcy first view each other. The original version of the novel was written in 1796-1797 under the title First Impressions, and was probably in the form of an exchange of letters. Jane Austen's own tongue-in-cheek opinion of he ...
    Related: jane, jane austen, novels, pride and prejudice, walter scott
  • Joan Of Arc - 1,042 words
    Joan Of Arc The historical novel is one of those flexible inventions which can he fitted to the mood or genius of any writer, and can be either story or history in the proportion he prefers. Walter Scott, who contrived it, tested its elasticity as fully as any of the long line of romancers who have followed him in every land and language. It has been a favorite form with readers from the first, and it will be to the last, because it gives them the feeling that to read so much about people who once lived and figured in human events is not such a waste of time as to read of people who never lived at all, or figured in anything but the author's fancy. With a race like ours, which always desires ...
    Related: joan, joan of arc, anglo saxon, jane austen, throw
  • King Lear - 484 words
    King Lear "Oh what a tangled web we weave, when first we practice to deceive". Sir Walter Scott may not have intended to describe the tangled web of secrets that fuels Shakespeare's tragedy "King Lear", but it certainly applies. Secrets come in many shapes and sizes, and in works of literature they can be categorized as either secrets that are unknown to the reader or secrets that unknown to the characters. In "King Lear", the secrets are kept from the characters. As in many great tragedies, it is the secrets in Shakespeare's "King Lear" that cause the tragedy to occur. In the first scene of "King Lear", Lear tells his youngest daughter that "nothing will come of nothing", referring to her r ...
    Related: king lear, lear, good and evil, romeo and juliet, sympathetic
  • Kubla Khan - 2,827 words
    Kubla Khan Kubla Khan If a man could pass thro' Paradise in a Dream, & have a flower presented to him as a pledge that his Soul had really been there, & found that flower in his hand when he awoke -- Aye! and what then? (CN, iii 4287) Kubla Khan is a fascinating and exasperating poem written by Samuel Taylor Coleridge (. Almost everyone who has read it, has been charmed by its magic. It must surely be true that no poem of comparable length in English or any other language has been the subject of so much critical commentary. Its fifty-four lines have spawned thousands of pages of discussion and analysis. Kubla Khan is the sole or a major subject in five book-length studies; close to 150 artic ...
    Related: khan, kubla, kubla khan, rime of the ancient mariner, romantic poets
  • Lochinvar - 895 words
    Lochinvar Lochinvar Lochinvar is a narrative poem from early last century which records the daring abduction of Ellen by the young Scottish lord Lochinvar. I found this poem by Sir Walter Scott interesting and enjoyable because it is written in the style of a fairy tale, it is a strong and lively poem, it uses archaic language, it has repetition, and passes on a message of determination to it's readers. Lochinvar is an enjoyable and interesting poem because it uses a fairy/folk tale style of writing. For example ' So boldly he enter'd the Netherby Hall.' This sentence starts like a folk- tale and portrays Lochinvar's bold stature as he enters a room full of people who are against him. ' I lo ...
    Related: narrative poem, fairy tale, walter scott, stresses, enjoyable
  • Samuel Clemens Works - 1,757 words
    ... e forty-five "princesses" held captive in "a castle" by "three ogres." Safely back in Camelot, Hank decides that the time has now come to impose upon Britain the technology he had been nurturing over the years. He determines "to destroy knight-errantry or be its victim"- which hardly seems generous of him, since he now owes his life to the fidelity of te same knights he has vowed to destroy. He enters a tournament and shoots his knightly foe dead with a revolver. He thereupon dares "the chivalry of England to come against him- not by individual, but in mass!" Hundreds of knights promptly accept this challenge, but they break ranks and flee after Hank quickly shoots nine more men dead. Si ...
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  • Selfish Ambition Frankenstein - 1,441 words
    Selfish Ambition (Frankenstein) Selfish Ambition? The question What makes us who we are? has perplexed many scholars, scientists, and theorists over the years. This is a question that we still may have not found an answer to. There are theories that people are born good, evil, and as blank slates, but it is hard to prove any of these theories consistently. There have been countless cases of people who have grown up in good homes with loving parents, yet their destiny was to inflict destruction on others. On the other hand, there have been just as many cases of people who grew up on the streets without the guidance of a parental figure, but they chose to make a bad situation into a good one b ...
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  • The Courtship Of Miles Standish By Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 18071882 - 1,839 words
    The Courtship of Miles Standish by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882) The Courtship of Miles Standish by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882) Type of Work: Romantic narrative poem Setting Plymouth, Massachusetts; 1621 Principal Characters Miles Standish, a soldier and protector of the colony John Alden, his younger, bookish friend Priscilla, a young Puritan woman Play Overveiw On a spring afternoon in 1621, Captain Miles Standish, a short, powerfully-built man of middle age and a recent widower, stood in his house, surveying with pride his well-polished weapons of war. "If you wish a thing to be well done, you must do it yourself," he preached to his young friend John Alden, who sat wr ...
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  • The Development And Impact Of Romanricism On The Eupropean World - 1,632 words
    The Development And Impact Of Romanricism On The Eupropean World Romanticism, in a way, was a reaction against rigid Classicism, Rationalism, and Deism of the eighteenth century. Strongest in application between 1800 and 1850, the Romantic Movement differed from country to country and from romanticist to romanticist. Because it emphasized change it was an atmosphere in which events occurred and came to affect not only the way humans thought and expressed themselves, but also the way they lived socially and politically. (Abrams, M.H. Pg. 13) "Romanticism emphasized the individual, the subjective, the irrational, the imaginative, the personal, the spontaneous, the emotional, the visionary, and ...
    Related: real world, social issues, age of enlightenment, percy bysshe shelley, hoffmann
  • Things Fall Apart - 488 words
    Things Fall Apart Annonymous Huck had several struggles with his conscience, whether it was right that he was helping Jim, a slave, to run away to freedom, should he leave the men on the Walter Scott to drown, and should he stop the king and the duke from fleecing the girls. Huck's biggest struggle by far was whether he should help Jim escape. This struggle can be attributed to the time-period, when slavery was accepted as a way of life. During the time, a person who helped a slave escape was considered a low-life, and Huck certainly did not want to bear that title. Huck had to wrestle with this idea two times during the story. The first time was when they were on the river, when Huck had ma ...
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  • Washington Irving - 1,543 words
    ... he ten years between 1809 and 1819. Supported by his family and lionized by society for his early successes, Irving lived up to his reputation as a genial man of leisure. The second phase of Washington Irving's search for identity commenced when he set sail in May of 1815 for Europe. He was not to return for 17 years. His brother Peter falling ill, Irving stepped in to help run the import business. When the War of 1812 ended in 1815, low demand in the U.S. for trade goods from England caused the business to fail. Finally, in 1818, the brothers declared bankruptcy. Irving was devastated, becoming severely anxious about earning a livelihood. For the first time, he set out to write a commer ...
    Related: general washington, george washington, irving, washington irving, george iii
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