Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: black folk

  • 20 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • The Souls Of Black Folk - 1,293 words
    The Souls of Black Folk by W.E.B. Du Bois Du Bois was one of those people who studied and learned a lot of things about the world, a lot of things that he found to be extremely unjust. This became his source of energy for becoming an intellectual guide for America, warning it of "the 20th century color problem" and suggesting sound and rational courses of action for the country to take. His contention was expressed lyrically and with passion in The Souls of Black Folk that he wrote in 1903. His main philosophy was that an educated black elite should lead blacks to liberation. This deviated sharply with the emphasis by Booker T. Washington that industrial training for blacks and virtual silen ...
    Related: black community, black folk, folk, souls of black folk, declaration of independence
  • Afriancan Americans Role Of Television - 1,114 words
    Afriancan American's Role Of Television The roles African Americans play on television are not satisfactory. Though the roles have changed during the development of television, the current relationship is not representative of true African American people or their lifestyles. The question is how do the past roles African Americans play in television sitcoms compare to the current roles? How does this affect society's perception of the African American in American culture? Throughout the history of television the roles and the representation of African Americans has developed with the changing cultural conditions. However, the representation of African American's has not fully simulated into ...
    Related: african american, african american art, american art, american culture, american family, american people, famous african american
  • African American Writers - 910 words
    African American Writers The African- American Community has been blessed with a multitude of scholars. Two of those scholars include Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Du bois. Both of these men, had a vision for African- Americans. They wanted to see the advancement of their race of people. These great leaders just had different viewpoints as to how this should be accomplished. Mr. Washingtons viewpoints are based on his own personal experience and understanding of politics. Mr. Du bois viewpoints came from his knowledge of the importance of education and its ability to break down barriers of color. Washington and Du bois wanted to see the advancement of the African-American people. The quest ...
    Related: african, african american, american, american community, american people, american writers
  • Biography Of Langston Hughes - 940 words
    Biography Of Langston Hughes Langston Hughes was born in Joplin, Missouri, in 1902. His father, who had studied to become a lawyer, left for Mexico shortly after the baby was born. When Langston was seven or eight he went to live with his grandmother, who told him wonderful stories about Frederick Douglass and Sojourner Truth and took him to hear Booker T. Washington. She also introduced him to The Crisis, edited by W.E.B. Du Bois, who also wrote The Souls of Black Folk, young Langston's favorite book. After his grandmother died when he was twelve, Langston went to live with her friends, whom he called Auntie and Uncle Reed. Then, at age fourteen, his mother married again, and soon he accomp ...
    Related: biography, hughes, langston, langston hughes, claude mckay
  • Brown Vs The Board Of Education - 1,452 words
    Brown Vs. The Board Of Education Education has long been regarded as a valuable asset for all of America's youth. Yet, when this benefit is denied to a specific group, measures must be taken to protect its educational right. In the 1950's, a courageous group of activists launched a legal attack on segregation in schools. At the head of this attack was NAACP attorney Thurgood Marshall; his legal strategies would contribute greatly to the dissolution of educational segregation. According to U.S. Court Cases the segregation among whites and blacks was a legal law established for almost sixty years in the United States. However, Brown vs. The Board of Education was the turning point in race rela ...
    Related: american education, brown, brown v board of education, public education, third grade
  • David Walkers Appeals - 783 words
    David Walker's Appeals David Walker's Appeals As I read David Walker's Appeals, I notice this final edition was published by Black Classic Press. Webster's dictionary defines a classic as having lasting significance or worth; enduring. Under these terms, I would have to disagree. Despite great efforts of both the North and South to stop its publication, David Walker's Appeal became one of the most widely read and circulated books ever written by a black person. Walker was considered a hero by most abolitionists, who considered his book the boldest attack ever written against slavery. It had significant effects on race relations in 1829 America. However, as we enter the 21st century, David Wa ...
    Related: david, personal experience, the bible, race relations, slave
  • Discrimination - 1,717 words
    Discrimination Discrimination The struggle for social and economic equality of Black people in America has been long and slow. It is sometimes amazing that any progress has been made in the racial equality arena at all; every tentative step forward seems to be diluted by losses elsewhere. For every Stacey Koons that is convicted, there seems to be a Texaco executive waiting to send Blacks back to the past. Throughout the struggle for equal rights, there have been courageous Black leaders at the forefront of each discrete movement. From early activists such as Frederick Douglass, Booker T. Washington, and W.E.B. DuBois, to 1960s civil rights leaders and radicals such as Martin Luther King, Ma ...
    Related: discrimination, racial discrimination, black experience, civil rights, folk
  • Is America A Success - 1,118 words
    Is America A Success At the first of the year Miss Schoonmaker asked us if we thought America was a success or not. This got me thinking what are we going to learn that will make us think our country isnt a success? Well throughout the year I learned things that made me believe America is not a success. Things that made me not believe in America were how we go against things we pledge. Like the Constitution and how we treated blacks in the Civil Rights era. Another example is the American dream. The Dream was all centered primarily around money. Has it not been said that money is the root of all evil? Do we really believe in a country thats dream is evil? I believe the thought of the America ...
    Related: america, america american, martin luther, northern states, clothes
  • Jazz - 1,388 words
    Jazz When it comes to music, most people don't say they like it. People say they like heavy metal, pop, rhythm and blues, or any other type of music, since they have their own preference to what type of music they like, not just enjoying the broad area of music. One of those types of music which many enjoy is jazz. Actually right now jazz is really big and popular in Europe, and is rising in its popularity in the USA through its many forms. Jazz does have many forms, so many that some people wouldn't consider just saying they like jazz, they would say they enjoyed bebop, ragtime, blues, or other types of jazz. Jazz has survived longer than many types of music, and it has always influenced th ...
    Related: free jazz, jazz, orleans jazz, kansas city, louis armstrong
  • Langston Hughes - 1,003 words
    Langston Hughes As a talented American author, Langston Hughes captured and integrated the realities and demands of Africa America in his work by utilizing the beauty, dignity, and heritage of blacks in America in the 1920s. Hughes was reared for a time by his grandmother in Kansas after his parents divorce. Influenced by the poetry of Paul Laurence Dunbar and Carl Sandburg, he began writing creatively while still a boy. Not only did Hughes suffer from poverty but also from restrictions that came with living in a segregated community. While he attended an integrated school, he was not permitted to play team sports or join the Boy Scouts. Even his favorite movie theater put a sign that read N ...
    Related: hughes, langston, langston hughes, house publishers, black beauty
  • Langston Hughes - 1,459 words
    Langston Hughes Langston Hughes was one of the first black men to express the spirit of blues and jazz into words. An African American Hughes became a well known poet, novelist, journalist, and playwright. Because his father emigrated to Mexico and his mother was often away, Hughes was brought up in Lawrence, Kansas, by his grandmother Mary Langston. Her second husband (Hughes's grandfather) was a fierce abolitionist. She helped Hughes to see the cause of social justice. As a lonely child Hughes turned to reading and writing, publishing his first poems while in high school in Cleveland, Ohio. In 1921 he entered Columbia University, but left after an unhappy year. Even as he worked as a deliv ...
    Related: hughes, langston, langston hughes, great migration, kansas city
  • Life Of Langston Hughes - 398 words
    Life Of Langston Hughes Brandy Clapp Langston Hughes 2nd Period Langston Hughes is a well- known poet who lived in the twentieth century. He wrote many poems mainly with jazz and black folk rhymes. He is remembered for his great poetry and his self- biographies. He is one of the most famous authors in the world. Langston Hughes was born in Joplin, Missouri. His parents are James Nathaniel (father) and Carrie Mercer (mother); his grandmother took care of him in Lawrence, Kansas after his parents divorced He began writing at a young age and has enjoyed it since then. After he graduated high school in Cleveland he spent fifteen months in Mexico where his father lives. Langston is well known for ...
    Related: hughes, langston, langston hughes, black folk, teach english
  • Sunjata And Fredrick Dougalss - 497 words
    Sunjata And Fredrick Dougalss KATRINA GRIFFIN 10/12/99 HUM 2011.4 PRO CHAMBERS RESPONDS ON SUNJATA AND FREDRICK DOUGLASS READINGS In the story The Guardian of the Word, it shows how Africans Americans and modern post-colonial Africans are a like in rejection of history and traditional culture. The griot in the story was trying to explain the history and lineage to a young African boy when his teacher came and deliberately interrupted the lesson. The teacher regarded the griots lesson as meaningless and trivial compared to modern day teachings. The teacher did not understand or want to understand the old traditional way and culture from whence he came. The teacher represents the African Ameri ...
    Related: fredrick, fredrick douglass, william blake, james baldwin, invisible
  • The Color Purple - 612 words
    The Color Purple The Color Purple, by Alice Walker, is a very intense book to read. By intense, I mean it is a book touching very difficult and hard aspects of life of a poor, black oppressed woman in the early twentieth century. Walker does social criticism in her novel, mostly criticizing the way black women were treated in the early twentieth century. Walker uses the life experiences of Celie to illustrate her social criticism. The Color Purple is not written in the style of most novels. The author does not tell us everything about the characters, the setting, and why the characters behave the way they do. The novel is written in a series of letters, not dated. There are large gaps betwee ...
    Related: color purple, purple, the color purple, alice walker, early years
  • The Harlem Renaissance - 1,150 words
    The Harlem Renaissance Or the New Negro Movement The dawn of the 1920s ushered in an African American artistic and cultural movement, the likes of which have never and will likely never be seen again. Beginning as a series of literary discussions in Greenwich Village and Harlem, the "New Negro Movement" (later dubbed the Harlem Renaissance by Alain Locke) came to exalt the unique culture of African Americans and redefine African American expression. The movement spread throughout all areas of the arts and humanities, gaining a wider audience as it went along. Soon it became more than just an artistic movement, it was at the same time a social ideal. The authors and artists of the era simulta ...
    Related: harlem, harlem renaissance, renaissance, american identity, neale hurston
  • The Life And Studies Of Web Du Bios - 1,668 words
    ... wo sections of his main theory were his outlook on organizations, and the way he grouped politics. The best way to understand Du Bois theories is to look at his two main attributes. The Philadelphia Negro, written in 1899, and The Souls of Black Folk, written later in 1903. These two writings show how Du Bois thought of society in terms of race. At the turn of the last century, W.E.B. Du Bois walked the streets and alleys of lower Center City, looking for answers to the Negro problem. He came to Philadelphia in 1896 believing the world was thinking wrong about race because it did not know the truth about the lives of African Americans. What he found was a city within a city. 40,000 Afric ...
    Related: american life, bios, encarta encyclopedia, president john, educate
  • Web Du Bois - 1,047 words
    Web Du Bois The Life of William Edward Burghardt Du Bois William Edward Burghardt Du Bois was born in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. A descendant of African American, French, and Dutch ancestors, he demonstrated his intellectual gifts at an early age. He graduated from high school at age 16, the valedictorian and only black in his graduating class of 12. He was orphaned shortly after his graduation and was forced to fund his own college education. He won a scholarship to Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, where he excelled and saw for the first time the plight of Southern blacks. Du Bois had grown up with more privileges and advantages than most blacks living in the United States at ...
    Related: bois, college education, u.s. government, harvard university, initiated
  • Web Dubois - 651 words
    Web DuBois Web Du Bois was born a free man in his small village of Great Barington, Massachusetts, three years after the Civil War. For generations, the Du Bois family had been an accepted part of the community since before his great-grandfather had fought in the American Revolution. Early on, Du Bois was given an awareness of his African-heritage, through the ancient songs his grandmother taught him. This awareness set him apart from his New England community, with an ancestry shrouded in mystery, in sharp contrast to the precisely accounted history of the Western world. This difference would be the foundation for his desire to change the way African-Americans co-existed in America. As a st ...
    Related: dubois, civil rights movement, fisk university, booker t. washington, village
  • Web Dubois Booker T Washington - 1,151 words
    W.E.B. Dubois & Booker T. Washington At a time when the Black community is being afforded a free status, but not one of equality, many leaders arise out of the woodwork to appeal to the white governing body for social equality. The transition from the ninetieth century to the twentieth century gives birth to two of these leaders, Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Du Bois. These two men are both working to achieve a common goal, but the roads on which theyre each traveling to get there differ significantly. Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Du Bois offer different strategies for dealing with the problems of poverty and discrimination facing Black Americans. Booker T. Washingtons gradualism stance ...
    Related: booker, booker t washington, booker t. washington, dubois, black folk
  • William Edward Burghardt Du Bois - 765 words
    WILLIAM EDWARD BURGHARDT DU BOIS (1868-1963) Author, journalist, social reformer, activist, poet, philosopher, and educator W.E.B. Du Bois wielded one of the most influential pens in African-American history. For sixty-six years he functioned not only as a mentor, model, and spokesman for generations of black Americans but also as the conscience of black and white Americans alike who yearned for racial equality and social justice. Born in 1868 during the painful period of Reconstruction, Du Bois was graduated from Fisk University in 1888 and went on to earn a Ph.D. from Harvard in 1895 before entering the worlds of academe and activism. Using Atlanta University as his base from 1897-1910, he ...
    Related: bois, edward, edward burghardt, william edward burghardt, great temple
  • 20 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1