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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: wales

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  • England Latin Anglia, Political Division Of The Island Of Great Britain, Constituting, With Wales, The Principal Division Of - 4,616 words
    England (Latin Anglia), political division of the island of Great Britain, constituting, with Wales, the principal division of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. England occupies all of the island east of Wales and south of Scotland, another division of the United Kingdom. Established as an independent monarchy many centuries ago, England in time achieved political control over the rest of the island, all the British Isles, and vast sections of the world, becoming the nucleus of one of the greatest empires in history. The capital, largest city, and chief port of England is London, with a population (1991 preliminary) of 6,378,600. It is also the capital of Great Britai ...
    Related: church of england, division, great britain, latin, principal, southern england
  • England Latin Anglia, Political Division Of The Island Of Great Britain, Constituting, With Wales, The Principal Division Of - 4,705 words
    ... ion that was to last for 400 years. William was a hard ruler, punishing England, especially the north, when it disputed his authority. His power and efficiency can be seen in the Domesday Survey, a census for tax purposes, and in the Salisbury Oath of allegiance, which he demanded of all tenants. He appointed Lanfranc, an Italian clergyman, as archbishop of Canterbury. He also promoted church reform, especially by the creation of separate church courts, but retained royal control. When William died in 1087, he gave England to his second son, William II (Rufus), and Normandy to his eldest son, Robert. Henry, his third son, in due time got bothEngland in 1100, when William II died in a hun ...
    Related: bank of england, church of england, division, great britain, great schism, latin, political ideas
  • A Study Of Stonehenge - 1,515 words
    A Study Of Stonehenge A Study of Stonehenge I. Introduction Significance of the study Statement of the problem II. Stonehenge Facts A. Location B. Materials Used and Structure C. Stonehenge Today III. The History of the Stonehenge A. Myths and Legends B. Mysteries C. Wonder of the World? IV. Conclusion I. Introduction No place has generated so much speculation and wild theories as the standing stones of Stonehenge. After traveling for miles through the rolling hills and plains of the English countryside the sight of this unusual structure made me gasp. A walk around it only provoked more strange feelings. There's a sense that this is something very important. For over 5000 years it has stood ...
    Related: stonehenge, king arthur, significant events, century writer, empty
  • Abraham Lincoln - 1,920 words
    Abraham Lincoln Abraham Lincoln was born on February 12, 1809 in Kentucky. When he was two, the Lincolns moved a few miles to another farm on the old Cumberland Trail. A year later, his mother gave birth to another boy, Thomas, but he died a few days later. When Lincoln was seven his family moved to Indiana. In 1818, Lincolns mother died from a deadly disease called the "milk-sick." Then ten years later his sister died and left him with only his father and stepmother. Lincoln traveled to New Salem in April 1831 and settled there the following July. In the fall of 1836 he and Mrs. Bennett Abell had a deal that if she brought her single sister to New Salem he had to promise to marry her. When ...
    Related: abraham, abraham lincoln, lincoln, john wilkes booth, president johnson
  • Alcoholism - 2,059 words
    Alcoholism alcoholism Definitions and causal factors of alcoholism Alcoholism consists of a repetitive intake of alcoholic beverages to an extent that the drinker is harmed. The harm may be physical or mental; it may also be social or economic. Implicit in the conception of alcoholism as a disease is the idea that the person experiencing repeated or long-lasting injury from his drinking would alter his behaviour if he could. His failure to do so shows that he cannot help himself, that he has lost control over drinking. This conception incorporates the idea of addiction or dependence. Formal definitions of alcoholism vary according to the point of view of the definer. A simplistic, old-fashio ...
    Related: alcoholism, affective disorder, social factors, world war ii, relation
  • Alfred The Great - 1,744 words
    Alfred The Great King Alfred the Great King Alfred the Great was born at Wantage, in 849, on a royal manor of his father's holding, a family estate which long afterward he himself would leave in legacy to his wife. Alfred was the youngest of five children, four sons and a daughter, born to Ethelwulf by his wife Osburh. When Alfred was four years old, his father, the king, who by now had long despaired of getting to Rome in the present state of things, decided to send Alfred there, to at least receive the blessing of the Holy Father. The pope at the time, Leo the IV, gave Alfred the blessing to become king. Alfred's time came in the year mid-April 871, when King thelred died. Only a king of f ...
    Related: alfred, first great, present state, last year, preface
  • Amelia Earhart 20hrs 40 Min - 422 words
    Amelia Earhart 20Hrs. 40 Min. 20hrs. 40 min. In 20 hrs. 40 min., (New York, Knickerbacker Press, 1928), Amelia Earhart gives a brief summary of her younger days, and then goes on to give a detailed story of her flight across the Atlantic. 20 hrs. 40 min. opens with Amelia Earhart as a nurses aid in Toronto, Canada. Canada had been at war for 4 years and Amelia saw that there was war work that she could do. The devastation of war affected her whole outlook on life. Planes were a part of war, and this is where Amelia was first introduced to aviation. She believed that the inevitability of flying was one of the few worth-while things that emerged from the war. At the end of her short hospital c ...
    Related: amelia, amelia earhart, earhart, los angeles, long beach
  • Aristocracy In Britain - 981 words
    Aristocracy In Britain There was an argument going on in the Hudson Palace. The huge windows were shaking, the maids were running, trying to find a place to hide, the extravagant and expensive paintings by famous artists were about to fall on the red famous Iran rugs, because of Princess Danielles ear-blursting voice. I want another bodyguard!, Danielle said. But darling you already have twenty-five bodyguards, just for fun, your passion or desire whatever. They have little work to do and cost a big load of money to keep. , said Sir Alexander. But Alex darling, Countess Daphne has thirty and she is only a Countess. However I am the Princess of Wales and a member of the royal family. She does ...
    Related: aristocracy, britain, brad pitt, royal family, hollywood
  • Australia - 1,551 words
    Australia AUSTRALIA Australia is an island continent located southeast of Asia and forming, with the nearby island of Tasmania, the Commonwealth of Australia, a self-governing member of the Commonwealth of Nations. The continent is bounded on the north by the Timor Sea, the Arafura Sea, and the Torres Strait; on the east by the Coral Sea and the Tasman Sea; on the south by the Bass Strait and the Indian Ocean; and on the west by the Indian Ocean. The commonwealth extends for about about 2500 miles from east to west and for about 2300 miles from north to south. Its coastline measures some 22,826 miles. The area of the commonwealth is 2,966,150 square miles, and the area of the continent alone ...
    Related: australia, south australia, federal government, food and drink, exporter
  • Australia - 1,173 words
    Australia Australia is the only country that is also a continent. In area, Australia ranks as the sixth largest country and smallest continent. Australia is located between the South Pacific Ocean and the Indian Ocean. The part of the Indian Ocean that is south of Australia is called the Southern Ocean in the country. Australia is about 7,000 miles (11,000 kilometers) southwest of North America and about 2,000 miles (3,200 kilometers) southeast of mainland Asia. Australia is often referred to as being "down under" because it lies entirely within the Southern Hemisphere. The name Australia comes from the Latin word australis, which means southern. The official name of the country is the Commo ...
    Related: australia, south australia, high court, queen elizabeth, minister
  • Australia Day - 453 words
    Australia Day Australia Day Australia Day is a day set aside to commemorate the arrival of Captain Arthur Phillip and the First Fleet at Sydney Cove on the 26 January 1788. On the day of his arrival, Captain Arthur Phillip declared the area that became the colony of New South Wales to be a British possession. This landing started the first permanent European settlement on this island continent. Australia Day, January 26, is celebrated with a public holiday and celebrations in every State. The choice of the 26 January as the day of celebration for all Australians has been queried and argued by many people. That the day might symbolize invasion, dispossession and death to many Aboriginal peopl ...
    Related: australia, south wales, aboriginal people, indigenous people, notion
  • B2b In Smes: Perspectives And Future Challenges, - 1,933 words
    ... has become more attractive as it is more cost-effective than before thanks to more efficient communication. Henriott (1999) However, not all companies outsource their production. They fear losing control over intellectual property and quality or leaking innovations to competitors. They also want to keep in touch with customers and industry trends. Engardio (1998) c) The changing role of the customer Relationships may change in B2B e-commerce. Customer know-how is employed in many e-commerce cases, as the customer has the facility to configure the product required and in some cases the control of the supply chain is also customer controlled. The customer is now more demanding and is plea ...
    Related: future challenges, south east, project team, potential benefits, predict
  • Babylon Revisited - 1,033 words
    Babylon Revisited An Analysis of "Babylon Revisited" In the short story "Babylon Revisited," a man named Charlie Wales has come back to Paris with the intent of regaining custody of his nine year old daughter. She has been staying with her aunt and uncle since the death of her mother. Being in Paris brings back memories of his previous lifestyle of drinking, late night socializing, and excessive spending. During lunch with his daughter he encounters two friends from his carousing days, but since he is attempting to turn his life around, he has no desire to renew their friendship. He politely declines their invitation to meet up later so that he can spend time with his daughter. While finaliz ...
    Related: babylon, revisited, market crash, family member, invitation
  • Beatlemania In The 1960s - 1,627 words
    Beatlemania in the 1960s The Beatles were a mystical happening that many people still don't understand. Phenomenoligists had a ball in 1964 with Beatlemania, a generally harmless form of madness which came from Britain in 1963. The sole cause of Beatlemania is a quartet of young Englishmen known as the Beatles. In the less than one year that they achieved popularity in England to the time they came to America, The Beatles achieved a popularity and following that is unprecedented in the history of show business in England. They became the first recording artists anywhere in the world to have a record become a million-seller before it's release. They became the target of such adoration by thei ...
    Related: the girl, middle class, medical ethics, seller, invasion
  • Beatlemania In The 1960s - 1,628 words
    Beatlemania in the 1960s The Beatles were a mystical happening that many people still don't underezd. Phenomenoligists had a ball in 1964 with Beatlemania, a generally harmless form of madness which came from Britain in 1963. The sole cause of Beatlemania is a quartet of young Englishmen known as the Beatles. In the less than one year that they achieved popularity in England to the time they came to America, The Beatles achieved a popularity and following that is unprecedented in the history of show business in England. They became the first recording artists anywhere in the world to have a record become a million-seller before it's release. They became the target of such adoration by their ...
    Related: popular culture, rockefeller center, the girl, editorial, beethoven
  • Biotech Food - 1,122 words
    ... than before with less space. Bacteria have been reengineered to produce rennet, which is an enzyme used to make cheese and is widely used by U.S. cheese producers. Bovine Growth Hormone (BGH) is made for engineered bacteria and is used to increase milk production in cows. BGH is currently being used by approximately 10% of the U.S. dairy farms. Some other benefit expected in the near future are reduced levels of natural toxins in the plants, extending the shelf life of food, and simpler and faster methods in located pathogens, toxins and contaminants. Some products being released soon with these benefits are healthier oils, sweeter peas with higher plant yields, bananas and pineapples wi ...
    Related: biotech, food safety, food security, advanced technology, growth hormone
  • Breaking Through The Foul And Ugly Mists: Chiasmus In I Henry Iv - 1,553 words
    Breaking Through The Foul And Ugly Mists: Chiasmus In I Henry Iv Breaking through the foul and ugly mists: Chiasmus in I Henry IV In Shakespeares historic play King Henry the Fourth, Part One, the ingenious playwright uses an interesting and powerful method of presenting the honorable by introducing that character at the rock bottom of his potential and, as Hal puts it, breaking through the foul and ugly mists/ Of vapors that did seem to strangle him (I.ii, 155-6). Chiasmus, in Shakespeares plays, is the inversion of two characters reputation and personality traits. In I Henry IV this technique can be seen in the shifting of the readers perception of Harry Percy, more vividly known as Hotspu ...
    Related: foul, henry iv, king henry, ugly, prince hal
  • Canterbury Tales By Chaucer - 1,819 words
    Canterbury Tales By Chaucer By far Chaucer's most popular work, although he might have preferred to have been remembered by Troilus and Criseyde, the Canterbury Tales was unfinished at his death. No less than fifty-six surviving manuscripts contain, or once contained, the full text. More than twenty others contain some parts or an individual tale. The work begins with a General Prologue in which the narrator arrives at the Tabard Inn in Southwark, and meets other pilgrims there, whom he describes. In the second part of the General Prologue the inn-keeper proposes that each of the pilgrims tell stories along the road to Canterbury, two each on the way there, two more on the return journey, an ...
    Related: canterbury, canterbury tales, chaucer, the canterbury tales, the pardoner
  • Childhood - 330 words
    Childhood We were then Children with nothing but Childhood. We played kiss Tag and suicide which Was merely a game with Throwing, and running, and Touching the side of the School house before the thud Of the ball. You became The rumor of a girl Who missed high school English And dated the boys who Would have, should have, will have Been in jail. They said You fought with your parents And even ran away At Christmastime. I became The sweetheart of the high School staff with "Excellents," Ivy League potential, A chance to do great deeds And late nights alone in My room, worrying if A ninety was an "A" Or a "B." What we became Was friends for life who ran And then walked naked on The dunes of Mo ...
    Related: new zealand, high school, the girl, beach, zealand
  • Computer Virus Technology - 1,778 words
    Computer Virus Technology 2.0 Introduction The wind of change came on 26th March in the form of an email cyclone called Melissa. Moreover, during 1999 numerous changes in the level of computer virus technology were seen, Armstrong (May 2000, p1). From an organisational point of view, societies around the world are just learning about the level of importance that computer security against virus attacks and the critical significance of cybercrime. Companies around the world lost vast amounts of time, money and resources due to the lack of defense systems and lack of knowledge. Companies must ensure that the all data processing equipment like computers, routers and networks are robust and secur ...
    Related: computer security, computer virus, technology, virus, operating system
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