Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: bits

  • 237 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>
  • A Look At Public Key Encryption - 1,210 words
    A Look at Public Key Encryption Encryption is the process of disguising information by transforming plain text into gibberish, or ciphertext, which cannot be understood by an unauthorized person. Decryption is the process of transforming ciphertext back into plaintext that can be read by anyone. Example of encryption can be found in history, for example in the era of the Cold War, the Solviet Union and the United States would send electronic messages to one military point to another, encrypted. If the enemy intercepted the message, they would have to crack this message to get the information. Typically when governments used encryption they used a very complex method of encrypting messages. E ...
    Related: data encryption, encryption, national security, major problem, essence
  • A Quantum Computer A Future Technology - 1,415 words
    A Quantum Computer... a future technology Mike Damewood By the strange laws of quantum mechanics, Folger, a senior editor at Discover, notes, an electron, proton, or other subatomic particle is "in more than one place at a time," because individual particles behave like waves, these different places are different states that an atom can exist in simultaneously. Ten years ago, Folger writes, David Deutsch, a physicist at Oxford University, argued that it may be possible to build an extremely powerful computer based on this peculiar reality. In 1994, Peter Shor, a mathematician at AT&T Bell Laboratories in New Jersey, proved that, in theory at least, a full-blown quantum computer could factor ...
    Related: quantum, quantum computer, quantum mechanics, technology, simple steps
  • A Reflection On Paul Hindemith - 1,231 words
    A Reflection On Paul Hindemith Paul Hindemith was revolutionary and a musical genius. Many people who lived around the same time saw him as nothing more than an untalented noisemaker. Granted, these people didnt have all of the various forms of music that we have today, but untalented would not be a word I would use to describe Paul Hindemith. He helped begin the last great change in classical music from the Romantic Era, which was very tonal and diatonic, to 20th Century Modern Music, which is extremely atonal. Diatonic means within in the key. In other words, everything sounds nice and pretty. There are no weird noises, no funny pitches. Atonal itself is defined as the avoidance of the tra ...
    Related: reflection, emory university, heart attack, yale university, zurich
  • Abuses Of The Medieval Catholic Clergy - 1,431 words
    Abuses of the Medieval Catholic Clergy The Dark Ages of Europe were called such for several reasons. One of the more notorious reasons was the state of the Catholic Church. In the years before the Reformation, members of the Catholic clergy had reached an all time low in terms of their morality. The abuses of clerical power and privileges by the medieval clergy spanned all parts of their daily lives. Members of the Catholic clergy were financially, politically and socially corrupt. Each of these corruptions made up the enormous religious corruption that was the logical result of such debauchery. Of the several grievances against the Church, [t]he first and sorest was that she loved money, an ...
    Related: catholic, catholic church, clergy, medieval, ordinary people
  • Adoption And Identity Formation - 994 words
    ... y, the adopted child must struggle with the competing and conflictual issues of good and bad parents, good and bad self, and separation from both adoptive parents and images of biological parents. If all adoptions were open, the adoptee would have the ability to know about the traits of each family. He would have an easier task of forming an identity for himself, rather than struggling with the issues of to whom he can relate. If the adolescent has some information about his birth parents, such as ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and religion, Horner and Rosenberg (1991) believe that the following can happen: From the bits of fact that they possess, adopted children develop and elaborate ...
    Related: adoption, formation, identity formation, life cycle, family life
  • Alexander The Great - 5,132 words
    ... 120 and the minimum 60. After the Battle 25 Macedonians fell"in the first charge. Alexander had a statue made of each of them. He then erected each statue somewhere near Granicus. He also erected a statue of himself, although he did not even die, let alone in first charge. This was a strange gesture that would never be repeated again. 2,000 of Memnon's mercenaries survived. After the battle they were chained like lions and sent back to forced labor, probably in the mines. This was not a very placatory gesture by Alexander. The reason he gave for it was that "they had violated Greek public opinion by fighting with the Orientals against the Greeks." After his victory, Alexander went across ...
    Related: alexander, alexander the great, great world, north east, indus river
  • Alice And The Wonderland - 1,577 words
    Alice And The Wonderland To millions around the world, Lewis Carrolls Alice in Wonderland is merely a childhood dreamland filled with riddles, fairy tails, and games without rules. However, to the trained eye, Alices world translates into much more than a childs bedtime story. There are many undeniable patterns and connections seen throughout his story that are simply too radical to be mere coincidence. The story of Alice is both a mixture of contradictory patterns and a metaphor for growth. With the right train-of-thought and a little imagination, this otherwise straightforward fairy tale becomes a key to Carrolls inner thoughts. Psychoanalysts have analyzed Alice in Wonderland since the ea ...
    Related: alice, alice in wonderland, wonderland, clinical practice, growing old
  • An Interview With Jane Reynolds About The Depression - 814 words
    An Interview With Jane Reynolds About The Depression The depression of the 1930s was a major event in many American's lives. It left them with little money, and even fewer resources. The country had to bind together to get through rough times, and each person was struggling to live individually. Enter Jane Reynolds, a 76 year old woman whose memories of the depression are surprisingly happy. Her family was very lucky in that her father owned a used car lot in Salt Lake City, a steady job that put food on the table. Jane says she remembers her father had to repossess cars all the time because no one had money to pay for anything. In 1930 Jane and her family moved into her grandparent's house, ...
    Related: interview, jane, reynolds, where america, modern times
  • Angelas Ashes - 1,275 words
    Angela's Ashes Both books that Ive read, Angelas Ashes and The Color of Water both demonstrated behavior than can be considered dysfunctional. A dysfunctional family is one that fails to meet some or all the basic needs of its members. Sometimes these needs, such as food, shelter or clothing are so basic that people take them for granted. More often, emotional needs, such as the need for love, support and security go unmet. Although a family can be dysfunctional in several ways there are some characteristics that occur more often than others. Drugs, alcoholism, death, abandonment, starvation and anxiety are some examples of dysfunctional characteristics that can be found in both Angelas Ashe ...
    Related: parenting skills, summer camp, playing games, therapy, alike
  • Animal Experimentation - 777 words
    Animal Experimentation Animal Experimentation ANIMAL RIGHTS-- The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals was founded in England in 1824 to promote humane treatment of work animals, such as cattle and horses, and of household pets. Within a few decades similar organizations existed throughout Europe. An American society was founded in New York in 1866. Then after, these organizations were protesting the use of animals in laboratory experiments and the use of vivisection for teaching. Until the mid-1970s the focus on humane treatment of animals continued. After that period, animal rights activists enlarged their priorities, considerably. It is estimated that 70 million animals are us ...
    Related: animal behavior, animal experimentation, animal research, animal rights, animal testing, experimentation
  • Archeology Goals - 919 words
    Archeology Goals Although there is little existing evidence of how life once was for ancient people much information can be gathered to create a full picture of what it was once like. To discover how it used to be there are three basic goals set by archeologists and other scientists. These goals consist of chronology, reconstruction and explanation. They are set to shed light on cultures and lives that were forgotten so long ago and link them to our own modern lives. Chronology is the records that archeologists and historians keep and use to gain a better perspective of time and to which era where each culture is placed. Excavations are an important aspect of chronology they are the basis fo ...
    Related: archeology, environmental factors, physical evidence, missing link, shed
  • Arthritis - 1,350 words
    Arthritis Arthritis As we grow older our bodies begin to degenerate, and stop working. There are many different kinds of diseases that we are subject to as we age, cancers, heart disease, Alzheimers disease, arthritis, and many others. All have a negative affect on our lives, making it difficult to function. Arthritis is the second leading chronic disease in the United States. Arthritis occurs when the body incorrectly identifies its own tissue as foreign matter and attacks it. Arthritis includes a set of more than eighty autoimmune diseases. Arthritis attacks connective tissues and joints. It causes stiffness, pain, inflammation, and swelling of the joints. Some kinds are crippling, but rar ...
    Related: arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, adult life, side effects, aunt
  • Artificial Intelligence - 1,853 words
    Artificial Intelligence As we get closer to the twenty-first century, we find that soon a computer will be another common household appliance. As the television was introduced in the 1950's, it soon became an essential part of everyday life. It is now found in every home and an importance source for entertainment and for gaining information. In the next couple of years, the same will be said for computer. It is fast becoming as essential part of our everyday life. With the Internet becoming an important resource for gaining information with the touch of a button. Yet, this is just the beginning of the computer age. We now use components from computers to run other household appliances such a ...
    Related: artificial, artificial intelligence, intelligence, twenty-first century, first century
  • Artificial Intelligence - 2,507 words
    Artificial Intelligence Artificial Intelligence is based in the view that the only way to prove you know the mind's causal properties is to build it. In its purest form, AI research seeks to create an automaton possessing human intellectual capabilities and eventually, consciousness. There is no current theory of human consciousness which is widely accepted, yet AI pioneers like Hans Moravec enthusiastically postulate that in the next century, machines will either surpass human intelligence, or human beings will become machines themselves (through a process of scanning the brain into a computer). Those such as Moravec, who see the eventual result as "the universe extending to a single thinki ...
    Related: artificial, artificial intelligence, human intelligence, intelligence, philosophical views
  • Artificial Intelligence - 2,507 words
    Artificial Intelligence Artificial Intelligence is based in the view that the only way to prove you know the mind's causal properties is to build it. In its purest form, AI research seeks to create an automaton possessing human intellectual capabilities and eventually, consciousness. There is no current theory of human consciousness which is widely accepted, yet AI pioneers like Hans Moravec enthusiastically postulate that in the next century, machines will either surpass human intelligence, or human beings will become machines themselves (through a process of scanning the brain into a computer). Those such as Moravec, who see the eventual result as "the universe extending to a single thinki ...
    Related: artificial, artificial intelligence, human intelligence, intelligence, alan turing
  • Artificial Intelligence - 2,508 words
    Artificial Intelligence Artificial Intelligence is based in the view that the only way to prove you know the mind's causal properties is to build it. In its purest form, AI research seeks to create an automaton possessing human intellectual capabilities and eventually, consciousness. There is no current theory of human consciousness which is widely accepted, yet AI pioneers like Hans Moravec enthusiastically postulate that in the next century, machines will either surpass human intelligence, or human beings will become machines themselves (through a process of scanning the brain into a computer). Those such as Moravec, who see the eventual result as the universe extending to a single thinkin ...
    Related: artificial, artificial intelligence, human intelligence, intelligence, carnegie mellon university
  • Artificial Intelligence - 2,478 words
    ... -language, through syntax, that we construct our world. This is the essence of Chomsky's constructivism. So we see that if we are to construct a thinking machine (or for that matter, representations in our mind of a thinking machine) this broad syntax does significantly clarify how to go about designing a computer which can take discourse as input, remember and learn, etc. . .If we realize however the syntactic nature of the minds which create the machine, we can see that it is possible for a machine to think syntactically, or at least that Searle's Chinese Room argument does not stand up, because cognition is not dependent on semantics. Thus, a thinking machine would be a purely syntact ...
    Related: artificial, artificial intelligence, human intelligence, intelligence, human race
  • Asynchronous Transfer Mode - 1,094 words
    Asynchronous Transfer Mode Asynchronous Transfer Mode: Asynchronous Transfer Mode By Gene Bandy State Technical Institute Asynchronous Transfer Mode: Asynchronous Transfer Mode(ATM) is a high-speed transmission protocol in which data blocks are broken into small cells that are transmitted individually and possibly via different routes in a manner similar to packet-switching technology. In other words, it is a form of data transmission that allows voice, video and data to be sent along the same network. In the past, voice, video and data were transferred using separate networks: voice traffic over the phone, video over cable networks and data over an internetwork. ATM is a cell- switching and ...
    Related: mode, transfer, york john wiley sons, fast ethernet, customer
  • Authenticity: Charles Taylor Ethics Of Authenticity - 555 words
    Authenticity: Charles Taylor Ethics Of Authenticity In The Ethics of Authenticity Charles Taylor makes a radical claim that we only become capable of understanding ourselves and defining our identity through dialogue. He says humans are fundamentally dialogical creatures (29) and cannot develop into individuals without interaction with others. Through dialogue we are able to exchange our ideas with others and construct our values and beliefs from bits and pieces we hear. This is how we become authentic humans. Authenticity is being true to yourself. It almost seems paradoxal; to discover your individuality you must converse with others. Charles Taylor also believes that some lives are better ...
    Related: authenticity, ethics, taylor, good life, modern society
  • Banned Books - 1,374 words
    Banned Books I never heard of anyone who was really literate or who ever really loved books who wanted to suppress any of them. Censors only read a book with great difficulty, moving their lips as they puzzle out each syllable, when someone tells them that the book is unfit to read. ~Robertson Davies Throughout all of history, human beings have been continuously seeking new mediums of communication, specifically for the purpose of exchanging ideas and information. This has been done in a series of ways, including spoken language, hand gestures, and, most importantly, the written word. The written word has an advantage over all other forms of communication, for it allows many people access to ...
    Related: banned, banned books, creative writing, critical thinking, readily
  • 237 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>