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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: victorian society

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  • Amy Lowells Patterns - 522 words
    Amy LowellS Patterns On the outside, the speaker in Amy Lowell's "Patterns" acts the way Victorian society expects of her. However, on the inside, she expresses her emotions and what she truly feels. The speaker is confined to each "button, hook, and lace" of society's values. When confronted with an emotional situation, she bottles her feelings and only confesses them to herself. The "patterns" serve as guidelines for the speaker's life. The speaker is constantly bombarded by what Victorian society expects of her. Her "stiff, brocaded gown" serves as a stand to hold her up. Without it, she would crumble with emotion. She mustn't show any form of feeling, so she feels as if there is "not a s ...
    Related: amy lowell, victorian society, brand, shade
  • Awakening - 816 words
    Awakening When faced with the question of "which novel did I have the greatest reaction to this semester?", the first story that came to mind was The Awakening. Although written from the perspective of a woman, I found that this story rendered my greatest emotional appeal. It is a story of a woman, Edna Pontellier, who transforms herself from an obedient housewife to a person who is alive with strength of character and emotions that she no longer has to suppress. The metamorphosis is shaped by her surroundings. It is the narrow minded view of society in Victorian times that makes this story possible. Just as her behavior is more shocking and horrifying because of her position in society, it ...
    Related: awakening, the awakening, kate chopin, victorian society, shocking
  • Charles Dickens Bleak House - 655 words
    Charles Dickens` Bleak House Chancery, The Parasite That Plagues the Victorian Society In Charles Dickens Bleak House, Chancery is portrayed as a disease that plagues the Victorian society. Dickens uses the suits and the lawyers of Chancery to display its effects on the whole society. The suits are "slow, expensive, British, constitutional kind of things" (25) that stifle and bemuse those that come in contact with them. In Ms. Flite's case, the suit has deteriorated her life. She attends Chancery regularly expecting a judgement that is never to come and yet, she lives a "pinched" (73) lifestyle, unable to help herself or others. In addition, she cages birds she intends to set free on her jud ...
    Related: bleak, bleak house, charles dickens, power over, upper class
  • Dolls House - 1,421 words
    Doll's House In Henrik Ibsens play A Dolls House, the personality of the protagonist Nora Helmer is developed and revealed through her interactions and conversations with the other characters in the play, including Mrs. Linde, Nils Krogstad, Dr. Rank and Ann-Marie. Ibsen also uses certain dramatic and literary techniques and styles, such as irony, juxtaposition and parallelism to further reveal interesting aspects of Noras personality. Mrs. Linde provides and interesting juxtaposition to Nora, while Krogstad initially provides the plot elements required for Noras character to fully expand in the play. Dr. Ranks love for Nora provides irony and an interesting twist in their relationship, whil ...
    Related: dolls house, literary techniques, married life, victorian society, henrik
  • Dolls House By Ibsen - 768 words
    Doll's House By Ibsen In reading Ibsen's A Doll's House today, one may find it hard to imagine how daring it seemed at the time it was written one hundred years ago. Its theme, the emancipation of a woman, makes it seem almost contemporary. In Act I, there are many clues that hint at the kind of marriage Nora and Torvald have. It seems that Nora is a doll controlled by Torvald. She relies on him for everything, from movements to thoughts, much like a puppet who is dependent on its puppet master for all of its actions. The most obvious example of Torvald's physical control over Nora is his reteaching her the tarantella. Nora pretends that she needs Torvald to teach her every move in order to ...
    Related: a doll's house, dolls house, ibsen, victorian society, true love
  • Flatland By Edwin Abbott - 629 words
    Flatland By Edwin Abbott Dimensions: you keep running into them while reading your books and attending your lectures, and in most computations they are not very difficult to handle. But have you ever tried to imagine what all those more-dimensional spaces and objects look like? For example, the four-dimensional analogon of a cube? There are lots of people who will put this aside as nonsense, not worth spending your time on, but there have been others who found this a very intriguing question. One of those people was Edwin A. Abbott, a nineteenth-century schoolmaster and clergyman who was fond of mathematics and literature. In 1884 he wrote "Flatland", a small but very amusing book which is n ...
    Related: abbott, edwin, victorian society, nineteenth century, naturally
  • Jane - 921 words
    Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte Charlotte Bronte's Example for Women Charlotte Bronte, in her novel, Jane Eyre, establishes us with a first-hand account of a women's triumph over hardships. Jain was born orphaned, poor, and grew up in an un-loving home. To add insult to injury, she was a woman in Victorian society; a subordinate position to begin with. Throughout the novel, Jane faces many hardships that truly tested her spirit and integrity. She refused to have her life determined for her, and stayed strong through adversity. By giving us the character of Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte gives us a medium in which to feel the suffering and powerlessness of Jane's situations. The first-person narra ...
    Related: jane, jane eyre, john reed, turning point, retaliation
  • Jane Austen - 1,241 words
    Jane Austen Jane Austens novel Emma is basically a biography. As Jane Austen matured through her childhood years, she acquired many talents which are reflected through the character Emma. Jane Austen lived in the popular image of Victorian society. Many critics agree that Jane Austen bases her novels on her own life. In the novel Emma Jane Austen portrays her life in a time of maturing through the main character Emma. In the early years of Jane Austen, her accomplishments and talents are then reflected in the character Emma. Austen as a child had an excellent talent for drawing, painting, playing the piano, and dancing. As in her novel Emma, the character Emma is very talented in these areas ...
    Related: austen, jane, jane austen, middle class, early years
  • Jane Eyre Miss Temples Influence On Jane - 927 words
    Jane Eyre - Miss Temple's Influence on Jane Jane Eyre - Miss Temple's Influence on Jane "Jane Eyre" is set during the Victorian period, at a time where a women's role in society was restrictive and repressive and class differences distinct. A job as a governess was one of the only few respectable positions available to the educated but impoverished single women. Not only is "Jane Eyre" a novel about one woman's journey through life, but Brontë also conveys to the reader the social injustices of the period, such as poverty, lack of universal education and sexual inequality. Jane's plight and her "dependant" status is particularly emphasised at the beginning of the novel. Miss Temple is t ...
    Related: eyre, jane, jane eyre, role model, important role
  • Jude The Obscure By Hardy - 458 words
    Jude The Obscure By Hardy In Jude the Obscure, Thomas Hardy presents the characters Jude Fawley and Sue Bridehead, who violate the conventions of the repressive Victorian society while attempting to follow their natural instincts. By studying the novel, one sees that Hardy's intentions in doing this are to arouse the reader's sympathy for the characters, and to join in their ridicule of the codes of conduct they are breaking. The trial of Jude and Sue evoke a sympathetic response from the reader because the couple reflects the values which are prevalent in modern society. They suffer persecution for yielding to emotions which are no longer considered unacceptable or forbidden, as they were t ...
    Related: hardy, jude, jude the obscure, obscure, thomas hardy
  • Juliet Margaret Cameron Was A Pioneer Victorian Photographer During The Nineteenth Century She Took Up Photography Later In L - 489 words
    Juliet Margaret Cameron was a Pioneer Victorian photographer during the nineteenth century. She took up photography later in life at the age forty-eight when her daughter presented her with a camera. This simple gift sparked enthusiasm in Cameron and led her to become one of the most colorful personalities in photography. Cameron was born in Calcutta in 1815 to a well to do British Family. After being educated in Europe, she returned to the Cape of Good Hope in 1836. While she was there she met Charles Hay Cameron, whom she married in 1838. On Charles' retirement in 1848, they moved to London, the Isle of Wright, where Julia Margaret became part of Kensington's artistic community. In 1863, R ...
    Related: cameron, juliet, margaret, nineteenth, nineteenth century, photographer, photography
  • Lady Audleys Secret By Braddon - 1,234 words
    Lady Audley's Secret By Braddon Lady Audleys Secret, by Mary Elizabeth Braddon, is a novel of many elements. It has been placed in many different style or genre categories since its publication. I feel that it best fits under the melodrama or sensational genre, and under the subgenre of mystery. It contains significant elements of both types of writing, so I feel it is best to recognize both, keeping in mind that melodrama is its main device and mystery is a type of Victorian melodrama. In order to understand how the story fits into these categories, it is necessary to explore the Victorian characteristics of each, and apply them to the text. In addition to establishing the genres, it is imp ...
    Related: microsoft encarta, character development, victorian society, portraying, underlying
  • Middle Class Morality - 1,503 words
    Middle Class Morality MIDDLE CLASS MORALITY Values and morals of the Victorian era are quite different than those that our society upholds today. The satirical plays, A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen, and Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw, examine the problems with certain beliefs held by the people, both men and women, of the Victorian age. Furthermore, the people in general didn't not just hold certain morals, but the different classes in the Victorian society also held their own beliefs on moral code. Of which, the middle class beliefs are most closely examined in both plays. Men and women were expected by others in Victorian society to uphold certain moral behaviors. These expectations caus ...
    Related: middle class, morality, social issues, moral code, overlooked
  • Oliver - 1,030 words
    Oliver Twist And Anti Semism Charles Dickens being anti-Semitic when portraying the character Fagin as "the Jew", in his classic story Oliver Twist, or was he merely painting an accurate portrait of the 19th Century Jew in England? Some critics seem to believe so. Though there are no indications of neither anti-Semitic nor racist slurs throughout the story, Dickens' image turned out to follow the path of his time and place in history. The result is an enlightened picture of Victorian England's image of the Jew. The attitude towards Jews and Jewishness in 19th Century England demonstrates that Dickens was a man of his time. His attitude reflected the common British belief that Jews were villa ...
    Related: oliver, oliver twist, apostle paul, victorian society, stereotype
  • Pygmalion Act Iii - 955 words
    Pygmalion Act Iii It is Mrs. Higgins' at-home day, and she is greatly displeased when Henry Higgins shows up suddenly, for she knows from experience that he is too eccentric to be presentable in front of the sort of respectable company she is expecting. He explains to her that he wants to bring the experiment subject on whom he has been working for some months to her at-home, and explains the bet that he has made with Pickering. Mrs. Higgins is not pleased about this unsolicited visit from a common flower girl, but she has no time to oppose before Mrs. and Miss Eynsford Hill (the mother and daughter from the first scene) are shown into the parlor by the parlor-maid. Colonel Pickering enters ...
    Related: pygmalion, covent garden, victorian society, young women, shocking
  • Tennyson, Carlyle And The Tragic Hero - 1,121 words
    Tennyson, Carlyle And The Tragic Hero The Tragic Hero: Tennyson's Reinvention of the Hero as Poet I AM! yet what I am none cares or knows, My friends forsake me like a memory lost; I am the self-consumer of my woes, They rise and vanish, an oblivious host, Like shades in love and death's oblivion lost; And yet I am! and live with shadows tos't Into the nothingness of scorn and noise, Into the living sea of waking dreams, Where there is neither sense of life nor joys, But the vast shipwreck of my life's esteems; And e'en the dearest--that I loved the best-- Are strange--nay, rather stranger than the rest. - John Clare1 There is no more enduring theme in the truly Western body of literature, r ...
    Related: carlyle, thomas carlyle, tragic, tragic hero, literature religion
  • Tennyson, Carlyle And The Tragic Hero - 1,145 words
    ... the pursuit of something tragically noble. He recognizes his inability to be a hero to his people, and his inability to lead them into change when he speaks of his son; This is my son, mine own Telemachus, To whom I leave the sceptre and the isle... ...discerning to fulfil This labour, by slow prudence to make mild A rugged people... ... Most blameless is he, centered in the sphere Of common duties... (Ulysses, 33-40) Ulysses cannot be a hero to the Ithacans (and he insinuates that it is a lowly sort of hero to tame the rugged people), yet he is still determined to be heroic; Death closes all' but something ere the end, Some work of noble note, may yet be done, Not unbecoming men that s ...
    Related: carlyle, tragic, tragic hero, tragic heroes, victorian society
  • The Awakening The Birds, The Lovers And The Widow - 516 words
    The Awakening - The Birds, The Lovers And The Widow In the novel, The Awakening there are several motifs or images that assist in developing Edna Pontellier in her "awakening", the birds, the lovers and the woman and black all prove to be important parts in this. It is significant that The Awakening opens with two caged birds. Throughout the novel, Edna feels that marriage enslaves her to an identity she for which she is not suited. The parrot is an expensive bird valued for its beauty. The mockingbird is fairly common and plain, and it is valued for the music it provides. These two birds function as metaphors for the position of women in late Victorian society. Women are valued for their ph ...
    Related: awakening, the awakening, widow, social conventions, victorian woman
  • The City Of Today - 1,096 words
    The City of Today Glorious, glorious England. As the Empire spreads some say "so does its glory"; others mumble of the price which we pay for our greatness. Many of us Londoners have read, if not discussed, the intriguing debate transpiring between Sir Andrew Ure and Sir James Phillips Kay. Are the cities of great England truly representative of the jewels in Her Majesty's Crown? Or are they the stain of exploitation and abuse that some have proclaimed? Sir James Phillips Kay, an M.D. at Edinburgh and the Secretary to the Manchester Board of Health, has recently published a work titled, "The Moral And Physical Conditions of the Working-Class Employed in Cotton Manufacturing in Manchester." ( ...
    Related: british society, working class, living conditions, teaches, bourgeoisie
  • The City Of Today - 1,095 words
    The City of Today Glorious, glorious England. As the Empire spreads some say "so does its glory"; others mumble of the price which we pay for our greatness. Many of us Londoners have read, if not discussed, the intriguing debate transpiring between Sir Andrew Ure and Sir James Phillips Kay. Are the cities of great England truly representative of the jewels in Her Majesty's Crown? Or are they the stain of exploitation and abuse that some have proclaimed? Sir James Phillips Kay, an M.D. at Edinburgh and the Secretary to the Manchester Board of Health, has recently published a work titled, "The Moral And Physical Conditions of the Working-Class Employed in Cotton Manufacturing in Manchester." ( ...
    Related: slave trade, working class, political platform, holy, haven
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