Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: ultimate goal

  • 127 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>
  • To Attain His Ultimate Goal, Gandhi Had To Prove Worthy Of Its Rewards His Most Supreme Objective Was To Induce British Rule - 355 words
    To attain his ultimate goal, Gandhi had to prove worthy of its rewards. His most supreme objective was to induce British rule to calmly and peacefully leave India. He knew that the only way this could happen was if Britain began to respect his ideas and see that his belief truly was just. Gandhi spoke of nonviolent resistance as a method to help the opposing side see how they were committing sins. He knew that he would have to incite his fellow Indians to take the moral high road in the conflict with the British. In the movie he said, To gain independence, we must prove worthy of it. Martin Luther King, Jr. also encouraged his fellow African Americans with words that would make the white peo ...
    Related: attain, british, british rule, gandhi, induce, objective, ultimate goal
  • A Comparison Of Macbeth And Crime And Punishment - 1,336 words
    A Comparison of Macbeth and Crime and Punishment Shakespeares Macbeth and Dostoevskys Crime and Punishment explore the psychological depths of man. These two works examine tragedy as represented through the existential beliefs of many philosophers. Existentialist theory expresses the idea that man can satisfy his own needs, regardless of social codes, if he has the energy and ambition to act. Both Macbeth and Raskolnikov have the ambition to act, but each struggles internally with their actions, frightened of the consequences. Although these works examine the tragedy and remorse of Macbeth and Raskolnikov, the idea of a driving force within each character remains evident. Ultimately, William ...
    Related: comparison, crime, crime and punishment, macbeth, punishment
  • Ache Of Marriage - 714 words
    Ache Of Marriage In "The Ache of Marriage," Denise Levertov attempts to explain the pain this marriage experiences. It is a pain that affects both emotional and physical states of being. Levertov describes the pain as if someone were reading her thoughts. Through Levertov's use of non-conventional form, the theme of the pain of marriage and overcoming that pain jumps from the page. The author divides the poem into two parts. On one hand, Levertov shows the difficulty in making a marriage last. She depicts how a marriage can ache and hurt. On the other hand, Levertov says that a blissful marriage as the ultimate goal. All the trial and tribulations a marriage endures prove to be worth it the ...
    Related: ache, ultimate goal, free verse, literary device, clever
  • Adolf Hitler - 1,428 words
    Adolf Hitler Adolf Hitler Adolf Hitler was born on April 20th, 1889 in Braunau, Austria. He was the fourth child of Alois Schickelgruber and Klara Hitler. The couples first three offsprings died as children, but more two more were born later, in addition to Adolfs half siblings from his fathers previous marriage. A housemaid described Adolfs father as a strict but comfortable man, and his mother was known to give Adolf much love and affection. As a child, Adolf was very skilled at artwork, and even went to a special school for awhile, but he didnt do well there. His father died in 1903 of a pleural hemorrhage, and his mother died in 1907 of breast cancer. Hitler spent six years in Vienna, Au ...
    Related: adolf, adolf hitler, hitler, nazi party, jewish faith
  • Adolf Hitler - 1,456 words
    Adolf Hitler Hitler, Adolf (1889-1945) Founder and leader of Nazi Party, Head of State and Commander of the Armed Forces, Adolf Hitler was born in Austria on April 20, 1889. Hitler was born to Austrian customs officials, Alois Schickelgruber Hitler, and his third wife, Klara Poelzl, both from Austria. Hitler was a resentful and discontent child who was moody, lazy, and having a short temper. As a young man Hitler was very hostile towards his father and strongly attached to his mother, whose death from cancer in December of 1908 really had a big impact on his life. After spending about four years in the Realschule in Linz, he dropped out at sixteen years of age with intentions on becoming a p ...
    Related: adolf, adolf hitler, hitler, nazi party, weimar republic
  • Adolf Hitler - 1,265 words
    ... s of Zion were published in the local anti-Semitic newspaper. The false, but alarming accusations reinforced Hitler's anti-Semitism. Soon after, treatment of the Jews was a major theme of Hitler's orations, and the increasing scapegoating of the Jews for inflation, political instability, unemployment, and the humiliation in the war, found a willing audience. Jews were tied to internationalism by Hitler. The name of the party was changed to the National Socialist German Worker's party, and the red flag with the swastika was adopted as the party symbol. A local newspaper which appealed to anti-Semites was on the verge of bankruptcy, and Hitler raised funds to purchase it for the party. In ...
    Related: adolf, adolf hitler, hitler, benito mussolini, soviet union
  • American Philosophy - 626 words
    American Philosophy In all its forms, American philosophy emphasizes freedom and the supreme importance of the individual. Indeed, an examination of four major American writers shows these concepts in all four main schools of American thought-- Epicureanism, Transcendentalism, Pragmatism, and Protestantism. Epicureanism is the pursuit of pleasure in order to avoid pain. This philosophy is very American. One of the most famous American-Epicureans is Walt Whitman. Whitman is, perhaps, America's greatest poet. He was an ardent supporter of freedom and democracy. His poetry not only reflected his love and respect for America, but also the importance and the needs of the individual. Whitman's lov ...
    Related: american, american culture, american dream, american philosophy, american society, american writers, philosophy
  • Anarchy - 718 words
    Anarchy Anarchy, coming from the greek term meaning "without government", is the political theory that society does not need a government to run the country or any governmental fundings (although robbing them of what they robbed us wouldn't hurt). Many people believe that anarchy is a horrible and impossible way of living, stating that anarchism would leave us vulnerable to criminals and terrorists. This may be because of the terroristic methods that anarchists have taken to reach their ultimate goal. The terroristic anarchism movement came under the leadership of Mikhail Bakunin in the 1800's, and have continued with most individual anarchists and anarchist groups. I admit, there are some v ...
    Related: anarchy, mikhail bakunin, american government, political theory, constitution
  • Animal Farms Irony - 386 words
    Animal Farm's Irony Animal Farm is a classic portrayal of how power can effect the goals and hopes of a society. In this essay, I will explore the irony of Animal Farm, and how it used to satirize communism and dictatorships. The story begins with a revolution, and high hopes for the society being developed by the animals. But slowly, as the leading officials get a taste of power, things begin to change. The Commandments, a code by which all animals on Animal Farm live by, is secretly altered when the pigs (leading officials) begin to realize how great it is to live as a human being. Once they start drinking, No animal may drink alcohol soon becomes No animal may drink alcohol to excess. Lik ...
    Related: animal farm, dramatic irony, irony, ultimate goal, drink alcohol
  • Apartheid In Modern South Africa - 643 words
    Apartheid in Modern South Africa subject = History title = Apartheid in Modern South Africa Apartheid is the legal segregation of races promulgated in the Republic of South Africa. The discovery of gold and diamonds in South Africa during the 19th century, ultimately lead to racially segregated compounds for mine workers becoming the fore fathers of apartheid(Kanfer 79). By the 1920s de facto apartheid was the predominant feature of life in South Africa (79). Apartheid, fought against for many years, until now was still a main factor in South Africa life. Today apartheid approaches its final years as political supporters of anti-apartheid such as President Nelson Mandela continually fights f ...
    Related: africa, apartheid, south africa, south african, works cited
  • Attachment Theory - 1,027 words
    Attachment Theory Attachment Theory Attachment or bonding is the developing relationship established between a primary caregiver, usually the mother, and her child. Attachment behaviors begin early in life. This narrow age limit is often called the critical period. This trusting relationship developed in infancy forms the foundation for a child's development. If a child has a secure attachment, he will grow up to view the world as a safe place and will be able to develop other emotions. It has become more and more apparent that a healthy attachment is most important in human development. Why do some children survive and even rebound in the face of adversity? Some children are able to adapt a ...
    Related: attachment, attachment theory, social workers, individual development, bonding
  • Beauty And The Beast: Anorexia - 1,171 words
    Beauty And The Beast: Anorexia Julie Mallon Psychology 310 Beauty and the Beast : Anorexia It seemed to me that the older I got, the more obsessed people seemed about their bodies. Whether it was the diet soda boom of the 80's, or the fact everyone has always been unhappy with his or her natural bodies; it just took me a while to comprehend. It always seemed like there were diets here, diets there; these drugs can do this, or these herbs can do that Stop the insanity! This paper is going to discuss anorexia nervosa, an alarming disease that is usually developed during puberty of both boys and girls. Like bulimia, in which the subject binges and then disposes of ingested food by purging or us ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, beauty and the beast, social behavior, weight gain
  • Becoming A Knight - 1,103 words
    Becoming a Knight During the middle ages, in order to become a knight one had to go through many years of training. A knight-to-be spent at least fourteen years of his life learning the proper conduct and etiquette of knighthood. Once the years of training were completed, often an elaborate ceremony took place when the gentleman was knighted. Once knighted, the man had to live by the code of chivalry. This code had the basic guidelines of a knight's behavior. This code was so respected that abiding by it brought honor and respect from others. The education of a knight began at the age of seven. This was when a boy was taken from his home and sent to the castle of a famous noble, perhaps his ...
    Related: knight, the knight, middle ages, ultimate goal, banner
  • Beyond The Problem Of Evil - 3,962 words
    ... is caught in his illusion of volition . . . [This illusion], his assumption that free will exists, is also part of the calculable mechanism ( 106). When a misfortune strikes, we can overcome it either by removing its cause or else by changing the effect it has on our feelings . . .( 108). There are elements in each of these texts--e.g., the denial of free will, the rejection of the idea retributive justice, and the recognition of possibility of overcoming our emotional reactions rather than our external environment--which resonate with the sympathetic reader of Spinoza. And while, in later years, Nietzsche loses some of his positivistic fervor, we shall see that significant similarities ...
    Related: good and evil, spoke zarathustra, heavenly father, c. s. lewis, attain
  • Big And Working Girl, Corporate America - 984 words
    Big And Working Girl, Corporate America Stephen Ferruzza Professor Housel March 8, 2000 Essay # 2 Opinions and views that take place in Hollywood movies are intended to be realistic. To the viewer, the plots and stories seem so believable that reality becomes faded and a simulated world becomes present inside their minds. In the movies Big and Working girl, Corporate America is portrayed actually the way it is. The atmosphere in Corporate America has progressed toward a higher complexity. The education and skills needed to succeed must be met to rise the corporate ladder. Tess strives to better herself by taking speech class and attending seminars. Tess's knowledge and ambition also gave her ...
    Related: america, corporate, corporate america, power over, vice president
  • Bilingual Education Vs English Only - 2,104 words
    Bilingual Education Vs. English Only The Debate Between Bilingual Education and English Immersion Programs Bilingual Education is defined as any school program that uses two languages. In a more theoretical sense it is any educational program whose ultimate goal is for the participants to be fully versed in all facets of both languages (i.e., able to listen, speak , read, and write in both languages). The definition of a coordinated, developmental bilingual approach has emphasized the goal of being equally fluid in both languages. Realistically, this has not been the goal for most K-12 bilingual schools in the United States. More commonly in the United States we are using the words bilingual ...
    Related: bilingual, bilingual education, education program, english as a second language, english immersion, english speaking, limited english
  • Blaxploitation - 1,352 words
    Blaxploitation The Emergence of Colour In todays culturally diverse, politically correct society, it is hard to believe that at one time racism was not only accepted as the norm, but enjoyed for its entertainment value. Individuals of African descent in North America today take the large, diverse pool of opportunities offered by the film industry for granted. Much like Canadian theatre however, there was a time when a black man in any role, be it servant or slave, was virtually unheard of. It took the blaxpliotation films of the early nineteen seventies to change the stereotypical depiction of Black people in American Cinema, as it took The Farm Story, performed by a small troop of Canadian ...
    Related: film industry, ultimate goal, civil war, lucas, nigger
  • Brave New World Eugenics - 903 words
    Brave New World - Eugenics In chapter II of a Brave New World Revisited by Aldous Huxley, Huxley makes some very bold statements on the current state of our nations increasing technology towards medicine. This leads to the formation of the idea that we need to institute a eugenics program. Though there are many drawbacks in using eugenics, the ultimate goal is very beneficial. Huxley gives a very clear example on why we need a system like eugenics when he states an example which involves introducing a cure for malaria to a tropical island. Suppose someone was to go to a tropical island with DDT and wipe out malaria. After two or three years, hundreds of thousands of lives are saved. Though t ...
    Related: brave, brave new world, eugenics, world war ii, ultimate goal
  • Buddhism - 1,227 words
    Buddhism Buddhism According to Webster's definition, Buddhism is not a religion. It states that religion is the belief in or worship of God or gods(Webster's New World Dictionary pg.505). The Buddha was not a god(About Buddhism pg.1). There is no theology, no worship of a deity or deification of the Buddha(Butter pg.1) in Buddhism. Therefore Buddhists don't pray to a creator god(Buddhism FAQ's pg.1). Consequently, Buddhism is catagorized as a philosophy, but is still regarded it as a religion. The name Buddhism comes from the word 'budhi' which means to wake up and thus Buddhism is the philosophy of awakening(What is Buddhism pg.1). Fittingly, buddha literally means 'awakened one'( Buddhist ...
    Related: buddhism, northern india, noble eightfold path, second noble truth, awakening
  • Buddhism - 1,057 words
    Buddhism Dukkha is the first of the four noble truths of Buddhism. The word means suffering, but just to state suffering as the entirety of the first noble truth, is not enough because the expression of dukkha is the first truth that is needed for salvation. Moreover, dukkha is the conclusion of a logical chain of ideas that explains the life and death cycle of mankind. Before a person recognizes the truth of dukkha, he lives in a space of ignorance and with ignorance he seeks the fulfillment of his desires, yet with every demand met, he soon finds dissatisfaction. The longer a person lives the more apparent the truth of demise. With birth comes pain; with living comes pain and suffering. In ...
    Related: buddhism, life cycle, fold path, second noble truth, grief
  • 127 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>