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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: the knight

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  • The Princess, The Knight, And The Dragon By Malarkey Poetry Analysis - 358 words
    "The Princess, the Knight, and the Dragon" by Malarkey - Poetry Analysis The human institutions of nobility and dignity are often criticized by satirists. These satirists see these as arbitrary rules that man has placed on himself that do not help, and may even hurt them, in the long run. This point is capitalized upon by Stoddard Malarkey in his poem "The Princess, the Knight, and the Dragon". In the poem Malarkey's opinions can clearly be seen through the examples of the characters Princess Miranda, the maid, and the knight. The character of Princess Miranda is the obvious representative of ideas of dignity and nobility. She, fully aware of her own danger, does what the code of nobility th ...
    Related: dragon, poetry, more important, the knight, react
  • Two Warriors: A Comparison And Contrast Of Beowulf And The Knight From The Canterbury Tales - 591 words
    Two Warriors: A Comparison And Contrast Of Beowulf And The Knight From The Canterbury Tales The Canterbury Tales Character Knight Beowulf Quest - fights religious wars - fights for god - fights for the good of others - kills evil things - fights in order to have bragging right - fights for the good of others Societys View - most admired person of all the tales - seen as a hero - seen as boastful and overconfident - seen as a hero Religious Beliefs - believes in God - goes to church in his torn war clothes - believes in God and pagan gods - it is never mentioned of him going to church **Compare and/or contrast the Knight to Beowulf** All throughout literature there are characters that can be ...
    Related: beowulf, canterbury, canterbury tales, comparison, contrast, knight, the canterbury tales
  • 16th Century Poetry - 1,273 words
    16Th Century Poetry Part I: 1. Name three of the Germanic tribes that brought to England the dialects that make up the basis of the language we now call Old English. The Germanic tribes that brought the dialects were the Angles, the Saxons, and the Jutes. 2. Give an example from Beowulf of three of the following poetic devices: alliteration, the kenning, variation (repetition of appositives), or the litote (understatement). There are several examples of alliteration in lines 3079-3084, "Nothing we advised could ever convince the prince we loved, our land's guardian, not to vex the custodian of the gold, let him lie where he was long accustomed, lurk there under earth until the end of the wor ...
    Related: century poetry, poetry, wife of bath, queen guinevere, repetition
  • A Comparsion Between Modern Day Soilders And Medieval Knights - 448 words
    A Comparsion Between Modern Day Soilders And Medieval Knights In Medieval Times, A Knight was a mounted man-at-arms of medieval Europe. He served a king or other feudal superior, usually in return for the tenure of a tract of land, but sometimes he served his lord for money. The knight was generally a man of noble birth who had served in the lower ranks as page and squire before being ceremoniously inducted into knighthood by his superior. At his induction the knight usually swore to be brave, loyal, and courteous and to protect the defenseless. After the 15th century, knighthood was conferred on civilians as a reward for public services. A knight in armor would present a very strange appear ...
    Related: knights, medieval, medieval europe, medieval times, modern warfare, the knight
  • Affirmative Action - 1,487 words
    ... f Prop. 209 permits gender discrimination that is "reasonably necessary" to the "normal operation" of public education, employment and contracting. In 1998, The ban on use of affirmative action in admissions at the University of California went into effect. UC Berkeley had a 61% drop in admissions, and UCLA had a 36% decline. This decline strengthens the position of the Pro side of affirmative action. However, a contingency plan has been established. According to a source (who asked to remain nameless), UC Berkeley has a program to actively recruit more minority students that falls out of the guidelines established by prop. 209. These types of "loop holes" can ultimately hurt the various ...
    Related: action program, affirmative, affirmative action, chicago tribune, public administration
  • Analysis Of Wife Of Bath - 1,176 words
    Analysis of Wife of Bath Analysis of Wife of Bath Geoffrey Chaucer was charged with rape by a woman named Cecily Chaumpaigne around the year 1380. It is most likely that a distinguishable character, such as Chaucer would not have been guilty of this charge. However, the word "rape" probably referred to kidnapping rather than assaulting a woman as it means today. Cecily Chaumpaigne in 1380 released Chaucer of all charges of "raptu meo," a phrase that could be interpreted as "seizing me". It is possible that this allegation of rape brought on to Chaucer by Cecily Chaumpaigne, is the very reason behind the Tale of the Wife of Bath. The wife of Bath is a tough woman with a mind of her own and sh ...
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  • Arthurian Legend Is A Group Of Stories Of King Arthur And His Knights Of The Round Table The Legends Originated As A Collecti - 1,540 words
    ... orce with greater numbers. After a long battle almost all of her knights were defeated and she agreed to go with him if hed let them live. The battle ended and Melegans took the survivors captive so none of them could tell Lancelot, because he feared him greatly. After hearing that a message was secretly sent to Lancelot he prepared a trap for him. When Lancelot approached the site of the battle he had his horse shot out from under him. As he walked on to Melegans castle a cart came along on which he hitched a ride, which it was shameful for a knight to ride in the back of a cart (Bullfinch, n,p.). Once Lancelot finally got to her she was ashamed he rode in a cart but after telling her h ...
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  • Becoming A Knight - 1,103 words
    Becoming a Knight During the middle ages, in order to become a knight one had to go through many years of training. A knight-to-be spent at least fourteen years of his life learning the proper conduct and etiquette of knighthood. Once the years of training were completed, often an elaborate ceremony took place when the gentleman was knighted. Once knighted, the man had to live by the code of chivalry. This code had the basic guidelines of a knight's behavior. This code was so respected that abiding by it brought honor and respect from others. The education of a knight began at the age of seven. This was when a boy was taken from his home and sent to the castle of a famous noble, perhaps his ...
    Related: knight, the knight, middle ages, ultimate goal, banner
  • Becoming A Knight - 1,127 words
    ... g knight had to either join one of the great military orders, such as the Knights Templars, or hire out to a richer noble as a member of his private army. As a man-at-arms, he could always hope to make his fortune by getting his share of the profit, that was sometimes won in battle. He could also hope to get money by capturing a rich noble in combat and holding him in for ransom. It is obvious that knighthood was not easy for those who were not secure financially, and those who did not have a desire to protect the weak, aid the poor, seek justice, or honor pure womanhood. A knight had to agree to live by this code during his quest in becoming a knight. The many obligations of knighthood ...
    Related: knight, the knight, different forms, future king, ransom
  • Beowulf Part 1 - 431 words
    Beowulf Part 1 Beowulf Part I The Anglo-Saxons were the members of the Germanic peoples who invaded England. They were people of their own time, language and culture. In the Anglo-Saxon adventure filled tale of Beowulf, the heron Beowulf was, at the time, considered the modern day superman. His character exemplifies the Germanic hero, and consequently the Anglo-Saxon ideal: strong, fearless, bold, loyal, and stoic in his acceptance of fate. With the absence of courtesy, his important role in society and his ideals of chivalry, Beowulf was the definition of a hero in his own time. This novel develops the theme that with honor towards chivalry and faith in yourself, anything can be accomplishe ...
    Related: beowulf, king beowulf, important role, the knight, identical
  • Canterbury - 1,082 words
    Canterbury Tales The Millers Tale, as opposed to other tales that we have read so far, is filled with double meanings that one must understand to catch the crudeness and vulgarity that make the tale what it is. The fact that The Monks Tale should have followed The Knights Tale should tell you something about the Miller. The Miller ended up telling the second tale because he was drunk and demanded to go after the knight or he would leave the group (3132-33). The Reeve told the Miller to shut his mouth (3144). The Miller did not and proceeded along with his tale. The Miller uses his tale to insult the Knight and the Reeve. Although his story is identical in plot to that of The Knights Tale, th ...
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  • Canterbury Takes And Society - 474 words
    Canterbury Takes And Society The Canterbury Tales presents a picture of the society in which the author lived. The pilgrims tales reflect the changing views held by society at that time. The pilgrims must tell their tales to and from the shrine. The criteria to choose the winner are that the tale be instructive and amusing, "Tales of best sentence and most solas (38)." The tale that wins must teach a lesson and be entertaining at the same time. The tale of "The Wife of Bath" would have won the contest for these reasons. The tale is entertaining and there is a lesson to be learned in the end. The tale told by the Wife of Bath is an entertaining tale. The entertainment comes at the beginning o ...
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  • Canterbury Tales - 3,378 words
    ... singing abilities, Chanticleer decides to sing for him. While singing the fox has a chance to seize Chanticleer when he sings, because whiling singing he closes his eyes like his father did. As the fox uses more and more false flattery towards Chanticleer, he is less sacred and concentrates more on singing for Sir Russell Fox. While singing the fox snatches Chanticleer and runs away with him into the woods. Everyone panics and chases after the fox to try and get back Chanticleer. Another example of false flattery in " The Nun's Priest's Tale" is when Chanticleer uses it to free himself from danger. The fox takes him into the forest so he can eat him. But before that happens, Chanticleer ...
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  • Canterbury Tales - 1,037 words
    Canterbury Tales Though the characters in the Canterbury Tales are described vividly and often comically, it is not necessarily true that these characters are therefore stereotypes of The Middle ages. The intricate visual descriptions and the tales the characters tell help to direct the reader in finding a more accurate and realistic picture of the pilgrims, bringing into question the theory that Chaucer was just collating stereotypes from his time. The fact that there is one representative for each of the chief classes (under the higher nobility) would suggest that this work is an attempt to provide a catalogue of characters from the middle ages, and it can be assumed from this that this de ...
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  • Canterbury Tales - 1,005 words
    ... ee, nor of his wif." (55-56) and the miller pays heed to this warning, suppressing curiosity of "Goddes privetee" as regards the flood and trusting his wife so much as to leave her alone and independent while he travels on his business. This blind acceptance of 'Goddes' mysteries and his wife's deceit leads to his metaphoric and literal downfall when the tale comes to it's climax, as the miller falls from the roof, and again, literally and metaphorically waking up to find his wife having had sex with another man. The miller's wife Alison is another character that is represented using this same process of creating a stereotypical figure and then adding flaws and perversions. Alison is pre ...
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  • Canterbury Tales By Chaucer - 1,819 words
    Canterbury Tales By Chaucer By far Chaucer's most popular work, although he might have preferred to have been remembered by Troilus and Criseyde, the Canterbury Tales was unfinished at his death. No less than fifty-six surviving manuscripts contain, or once contained, the full text. More than twenty others contain some parts or an individual tale. The work begins with a General Prologue in which the narrator arrives at the Tabard Inn in Southwark, and meets other pilgrims there, whom he describes. In the second part of the General Prologue the inn-keeper proposes that each of the pilgrims tell stories along the road to Canterbury, two each on the way there, two more on the return journey, an ...
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  • Canterbury Tales By Chaucer - 1,862 words
    ... ink the wine, that he has poisoned, and also die. Fragment VII The Shipman's Tale: a fabliau in which a merchant's wife offers to sleep with a monk if he gives her money; he borrows the money from the merchant, sleeps with the wife, and later tells the merchant (who asks for his money on returning from a journey) that he has repaid it to his wife! She says that she has spent it all, and offers to repay her husband through time together in bed. The tale seems written to be told by a woman, perhaps it was originally given to the Wife of Bath? The Prioress's Prologue and Tale: a religious tale, in complete contrast to the Shipman's. A little boy is killed by wicked Jews because he sings a h ...
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  • Canterbury Tales By Chaucer And Medieval - 1,774 words
    Canterbury Tales By Chaucer And Medieval In the Prologue to the Caterbury Tales, Geoffrey Chaucer is almost always polite and respectful when he points out the foibles and weaknesses of people. He is able to do this by using genial satire, which is basically having a pleasant or friendly disposition while ridiculing human vices and follies. Chaucer also finds characteristics in the pilgrims that he admires. This is evident in the peaceful way he describes their attributes. The Nun is one of the pilgrims in which Chaucer uses genial satire to describe. He defines her as a woman who is, "Pleasant and friendly in her ways, and straining/ To counterfeit a courtly kind of grace" ( l.l. 136-137). ...
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  • Canterbury Tales By Reeve - 1,504 words
    Canterbury Tales By Reeve Such comments as, "I pray to God his nekke mote to-breke" quickly reveal that the verbal game of "quite" involves much more than a free meal to the Reeve in "The Canterbury Tales" (I 3918). This overreaction, which grabs the attention of the audience and gives it pause, is characteristic of the Reeves ostensibly odd behavior, being given to morose speeches followed by violent outbursts, all the while harboring spiteful desires. Anger typifies the Reeves dialogue and his tale, which begs the question why. It appears to be a reaction to the Millers insults, but they are not extreme enough to provoke such resentment. He seem-ingly has no hesitation in articulating his ...
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  • Canterbury Tales Wife Of Bath - 808 words
    Canterbury Tales - Wife of Bath The Wife of Bath is a very envious women, who desires only a few simple things in life.She likes to make mirror images of herself, through her stories, which in some way reflects the person who she really is. This is all proven through the many ways she portrays her characters. The Wife of Bath desires the obvious in life, but what she most desires above all is being more powerful than her man, her spouse, and her lover.In a relationship, she wishes to be the dominant of the two.The one who has the last say.The one who is in control and decides all of the matters in the relationship.This is shown in her tale when the knight fulfills his task to her."'...a wome ...
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