Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: the canterbury tales

  • 57 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • Chaucers The Canterbury Tales - 309 words
    ChaucerS The Canterbury Tales Deceit Then and Now Chaucer's, The Canterbury Tales, ridicule some common human frailties. Some of the frailties exposed satirize the church. Two characters whose weaknesses do such are The Pardoner and The Wife of Bath who are manipulative, selfish, and deceitful - all characteristics despised by the church. The Pardoner is manipulative in many ways. One is that he can make people believe nearly anything he says. He can get them to believe things will happen, no matter how preposterous they seem. By speaking in Latin, and by using fancy language, he is able to convince people many things, such as if they wear a certain mitten, their grain will multiply. The Par ...
    Related: canterbury, canterbury tales, the canterbury tales, wife of bath, the wife of bath
  • Marriage In Chaucers The Canterbury Tales - 1,425 words
    Marriage In Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales demonstrate many different attitudes toward and perceptions of marriage. Some of these ideas are very traditional, such as that discussed in the Franklin's Tale, and others are more liberal such as the marriages portrayed in the Miller's and the Wife of Bath's Tales. While several of these tales are rather comical, they do indeed give us a representation of the attitudes toward marriage at that time in history. D.W. Robertson, Jr. calls marriage the solution to the problem of love, the force which directs the will which is in turn the source of moral action (Andrew, 88). Marriage in Chaucer's time meant a union between ...
    Related: canterbury, canterbury tales, geoffrey chaucer, successful marriage, the canterbury tales
  • The Canterbury Tales The Wife Of Baths Prologue And Tale - 1,470 words
    The Canterbury Tales - The Wife of Bath's Prologue and Tale Struggle For Female Equality in "The Wife of Bath's Prologue and Tale" When Chaucer wrote the Canterbury Tales, the social structure of his world was changing rapidly. Chaucer himself was a prime example of new social mobility being granted to members of the emerging middle class. He had opportunities to come into contact not only with earthy characters from varied ports of call, but with the wealthy nobility. He was also married to a knight's daughter, someone of higher birth than himself, a clear demonstration of a more lenient class structure (pp. 76 - 77*). As a member of this changing society, Chaucer had a keen perception of t ...
    Related: canterbury, canterbury tales, prologue, tale, the canterbury tales, the wife of bath, wife of bath
  • The Canterbury Tales Women - 1,666 words
    The Canterbury Tales' Women The Canterbury Tales, by Geoffrey Chaucer is a collection of stories told by a group of pilgrims on their way to Thomas a' Becket's tomb in Canterbury. Throughout the stories, women are often portrayed in two opposing ways. The women in these tales are either depicted as pristine and virginal, or as cunning and deceitful. First, women are described as being pristine and virginal. This type of woman is always beautiful and has men vying for her affections. However, she is so pure that it seems she is unattainable. She is not treated like a real person and people never ask her what she wants. This virginal woman is captured in the character of Emily in The Knight's ...
    Related: canterbury, canterbury tales, first women, the canterbury tales, the knight
  • The Canterbury Tales, The Miller - 786 words
    The Canterbury Tales, The Miller The Prologue to the Canterbury Tales The Miller The Prologue to The Canterbury Tales were told during a pilgrimage journey from London to the shrine of the martyr St. Thomas a Becket at Canterbury Cathedral. This was approximately 70 miles to the southeast. These Tales were told by a group of 29 pilgrims, and a Host who met up with them at the Tabard Inn. They left the Inn on the morning of April, 11. The Nuns Priest Tale was the first story actually told, this was determined by whoever drew the shortest straw. The pilgrim who told the best story would win a free dinner, and the losers had to pay for his dinner. Geoffrey Chaucer who was without a doubt the gr ...
    Related: canterbury, canterbury cathedral, canterbury tales, miller, the canterbury tales, the miller
  • The Canterbury Tales: A Character Sketch Of Chaucers Knight - 549 words
    The Canterbury Tales: A Character Sketch of Chaucer's Knight Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, written in approximately 1385, is a collection of twenty-four stories ostensibly told by various people who are going on a religious pilgrimage to Canterbury Cathedral from London, England. Prior to the actual tales, however, Chaucer offers the reader a glimpse of fourteenth century life by way of what he refers to as a General Prologue. In this prologue, Chaucer introduces all of the characters who are involved in this imaginary journey and who will tell the tales. Among the characters included in this introductory section is a knight. Chaucer initially refers to the knight as "a most distingui ...
    Related: canterbury, canterbury cathedral, canterbury tales, character sketch, geoffrey chaucer, knight, sketch
  • The Canterbury Tales: A View Of The Medieval Christian Church - 1,565 words
    The Canterbury Tales: A view of the Medieval Christian Church SUBJECT: English 243 TITLE: "The Canterbury Tales: A view of the Medieval Christian Church" In discussing Chaucer's collection of stories called The Canterbury Tales, an interesting picture or illustration of the Medieval Christian Church is presented. However, while people demanded more voice in the affairs of government, the church became corrupt -- this corruption also led to a more crooked society. Nevertheless, there is no such thing as just church history; This is because the church can never be studied in isolation, simply because it has always related to the social, economic and political context of the day. In history the ...
    Related: canterbury, canterbury tales, christian, christian church, church history, english church, medieval
  • The Canterbury Tales: A View Of The Medieval Christian Church - 1,564 words
    ... hristian as well, politically and spiritually--could it be that they tolerated and respected paganism and magic? Perhaps the separation of the two is not necessary and was not complete at this point in time. Not only was magic a pagan tradition that persisted throughout the Middle Ages..another tradition, changing at the time, reflected the transition from worshipping the unseen forces in the world as many gods, to one, omnipotent God. Although the people were Christians, they took the separation of spiritual powers far beyond the creation the Trinity. The specific powers or emphasis given to each saint carries on even into today's Catholic tradition. The medieval period may have had som ...
    Related: canterbury, canterbury tales, christian, christian church, christian life, english church, medieval
  • Two Warriors: A Comparison And Contrast Of Beowulf And The Knight From The Canterbury Tales - 591 words
    Two Warriors: A Comparison And Contrast Of Beowulf And The Knight From The Canterbury Tales The Canterbury Tales Character Knight Beowulf Quest - fights religious wars - fights for god - fights for the good of others - kills evil things - fights in order to have bragging right - fights for the good of others Societys View - most admired person of all the tales - seen as a hero - seen as boastful and overconfident - seen as a hero Religious Beliefs - believes in God - goes to church in his torn war clothes - believes in God and pagan gods - it is never mentioned of him going to church **Compare and/or contrast the Knight to Beowulf** All throughout literature there are characters that can be ...
    Related: beowulf, canterbury, canterbury tales, comparison, contrast, knight, the canterbury tales
  • 16th Century Poetry - 1,273 words
    16Th Century Poetry Part I: 1. Name three of the Germanic tribes that brought to England the dialects that make up the basis of the language we now call Old English. The Germanic tribes that brought the dialects were the Angles, the Saxons, and the Jutes. 2. Give an example from Beowulf of three of the following poetic devices: alliteration, the kenning, variation (repetition of appositives), or the litote (understatement). There are several examples of alliteration in lines 3079-3084, "Nothing we advised could ever convince the prince we loved, our land's guardian, not to vex the custodian of the gold, let him lie where he was long accustomed, lurk there under earth until the end of the wor ...
    Related: century poetry, poetry, wife of bath, queen guinevere, repetition
  • Bad Medicine - 730 words
    Bad Medicine Bad Medicine Before the age of television shows, movies, and the Internet people entertained one another with vibrant and exaggerated tales. Geoffrey Chaucer's, The Canterbury Tales, is a good example of this form of entertainment. The novel details the journey of a band of pilgrims, who engaged in a storytelling competition, as they travel toward the shrine of Thomas Becket. These Middle Age storytellers varied as much as the stories, and consisted of a knight, physician, monk, and many more. In "the Prologue" the Physician is revealed as a con artist who cares more about himself than his patients. The Physician was a medical doctor, who was responsible for taking care of the ...
    Related: medicine, medical doctor, the canterbury tales, geoffrey chaucer, blood
  • Canterbury Takes And Society - 474 words
    Canterbury Takes And Society The Canterbury Tales presents a picture of the society in which the author lived. The pilgrims tales reflect the changing views held by society at that time. The pilgrims must tell their tales to and from the shrine. The criteria to choose the winner are that the tale be instructive and amusing, "Tales of best sentence and most solas (38)." The tale that wins must teach a lesson and be entertaining at the same time. The tale of "The Wife of Bath" would have won the contest for these reasons. The tale is entertaining and there is a lesson to be learned in the end. The tale told by the Wife of Bath is an entertaining tale. The entertainment comes at the beginning o ...
    Related: canterbury, canterbury tales, the canterbury tales, the wife of bath, medieval times
  • Canterbury Tales - 3,378 words
    ... singing abilities, Chanticleer decides to sing for him. While singing the fox has a chance to seize Chanticleer when he sings, because whiling singing he closes his eyes like his father did. As the fox uses more and more false flattery towards Chanticleer, he is less sacred and concentrates more on singing for Sir Russell Fox. While singing the fox snatches Chanticleer and runs away with him into the woods. Everyone panics and chases after the fox to try and get back Chanticleer. Another example of false flattery in " The Nun's Priest's Tale" is when Chanticleer uses it to free himself from danger. The fox takes him into the forest so he can eat him. But before that happens, Chanticleer ...
    Related: canterbury, canterbury tales, the canterbury tales, the pardoner, dear friend
  • Canterbury Tales - 2,228 words
    ... e lives with her lover of 3 years who also has dedicated her life to fighting for womans rights. The Cross Dresser spoke next. He is a young 20 something year old gay man who makes a living by being a female impersonator. He loves to get dressed up and go and sing and dance at local clubs and bachelor parties. While trying to make a living he has to be concerned about his health since he was recently diagnosed with the HIV virus. The Ski/Surfer Bum was an enjoyable guy. He is your typical burnout, stoner whoms life would lose all meaning if he couldnt find the perfect wave or the steepest mountain. He is by no means unintelligent but he does like to smoke marijuana and have a good time. ...
    Related: canterbury, canterbury tales, the canterbury tales, twenty-first century, personality traits
  • Canterbury Tales - 1,037 words
    Canterbury Tales Though the characters in the Canterbury Tales are described vividly and often comically, it is not necessarily true that these characters are therefore stereotypes of The Middle ages. The intricate visual descriptions and the tales the characters tell help to direct the reader in finding a more accurate and realistic picture of the pilgrims, bringing into question the theory that Chaucer was just collating stereotypes from his time. The fact that there is one representative for each of the chief classes (under the higher nobility) would suggest that this work is an attempt to provide a catalogue of characters from the middle ages, and it can be assumed from this that this de ...
    Related: canterbury, canterbury tales, the canterbury tales, the knight, middle ages
  • Canterbury Tales - 1,005 words
    ... ee, nor of his wif." (55-56) and the miller pays heed to this warning, suppressing curiosity of "Goddes privetee" as regards the flood and trusting his wife so much as to leave her alone and independent while he travels on his business. This blind acceptance of 'Goddes' mysteries and his wife's deceit leads to his metaphoric and literal downfall when the tale comes to it's climax, as the miller falls from the roof, and again, literally and metaphorically waking up to find his wife having had sex with another man. The miller's wife Alison is another character that is represented using this same process of creating a stereotypical figure and then adding flaws and perversions. Alison is pre ...
    Related: canterbury, canterbury tales, the canterbury tales, geoffrey chaucer, the knight
  • Canterbury Tales And Medieval Women - 1,047 words
    Canterbury Tales And Medieval Women Geoffrey Chaucers Impression of Women during Medieval Times Geoffrey Chaucer wrote the Canterbury Tales in the late 1400s. He came up with the idea of a pilgrimage to Canterbury in which each character attempts to tell the best story. In that setting Chaucer cleverly reveals a particular social condition of England during the time. In this period, the status, role, and attitudes towards women were clearly different from that of today. Two tales in Chaucers collection specifically address this subject: the Millers Tale and the Reeves Tale. The interplay between the tales and characters further enhances the similar viewpoints these stories have towards women ...
    Related: canterbury, canterbury tales, medieval, medieval times, the canterbury tales
  • Canterbury Tales By Chaucer - 1,671 words
    Canterbury Tales By Chaucer Geoffrey Chaucers Canterbury Tales is a story of nine and twenty pilgrims traveling to Canterbury, England in order to visit the shrine of St. Thomas A. Becket. The General Prologue starts by describing the beauty of nature and of happy times, and then Chaucer begins to introduce the pilgrims. Most of Chaucers pilgrims are not the honorable pilgrims a reader would expect from the beautiful opening of the prologue, and instead they are pilgrims that illustrate moral lessons. In the descriptions of the pilgrims, Chaucers language and wit helps to show the reader how timeless these character are. Chaucer describes his pilgrims in a very kind way, and he is not judgme ...
    Related: canterbury, canterbury tales, chaucer, the canterbury tales, greek philosopher
  • Canterbury Tales By Chaucer - 1,819 words
    Canterbury Tales By Chaucer By far Chaucer's most popular work, although he might have preferred to have been remembered by Troilus and Criseyde, the Canterbury Tales was unfinished at his death. No less than fifty-six surviving manuscripts contain, or once contained, the full text. More than twenty others contain some parts or an individual tale. The work begins with a General Prologue in which the narrator arrives at the Tabard Inn in Southwark, and meets other pilgrims there, whom he describes. In the second part of the General Prologue the inn-keeper proposes that each of the pilgrims tell stories along the road to Canterbury, two each on the way there, two more on the return journey, an ...
    Related: canterbury, canterbury tales, chaucer, the canterbury tales, the pardoner
  • Canterbury Tales By Chaucer - 1,862 words
    ... ink the wine, that he has poisoned, and also die. Fragment VII The Shipman's Tale: a fabliau in which a merchant's wife offers to sleep with a monk if he gives her money; he borrows the money from the merchant, sleeps with the wife, and later tells the merchant (who asks for his money on returning from a journey) that he has repaid it to his wife! She says that she has spent it all, and offers to repay her husband through time together in bed. The tale seems written to be told by a woman, perhaps it was originally given to the Wife of Bath? The Prioress's Prologue and Tale: a religious tale, in complete contrast to the Shipman's. A little boy is killed by wicked Jews because he sings a h ...
    Related: canterbury, canterbury tales, chaucer, the canterbury tales, the pardoner
  • 57 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3