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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: territory

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  • Thesis: Show How Mexico Lost An Enormous Territory To The Us In 1848 - 377 words
    Thesis: Show How Mexico Lost An Enormous Territory to the U.S. in 1848. Henry Polk was President of the U.S.A. from 1845, and was an imperialist. He wanted his country to expand by seizing Mexico's land. His goal was to try to make the States stretch from the Atlantic to the Pacific. Polk first offered 30,000,000 dollars to Mexico for California and New Mexico, but they refused. As relation between the two continued to worsen, it was in fact true that The U.S. had no real legal claim to those territories, and there were only seven hundred Americans compared to the 75,000 Spanish- speaking people living in the California and New Mexico territory. The Amerindians, of whom had a population of 3 ...
    Related: 1848, enormous, mexico, mexico city, new mexico, territory
  • Buckley Jr - 2,713 words
    1. WM. F. BUCKLEY JR. Last summer WFB was asked by the New York Bar Association to make a statement to the panel of lawyers considering the drug question. He made the following statement: We are speaking of a plague that consumes an estimated $75 billion per year of public money, exacts an estimated $70 billion a year from consumers, is responsible for nearly 50 per cent of the million Americans who are today in jail, occupies an estimated 50 per cent of the trial time of our judiciary, and takes the time of 400,000 policemen--yet a plague for which no cure is at hand, nor in prospect. Perhaps you, ladies and gentlemen of the Bar, will understand it if I chronicle my own itinerary on the sub ...
    Related: buckley, illegal drug, medical care, federal government, princeton
  • 5 Most Influential People In American History - 1,556 words
    5 Most Influential People In American History The United Sates has had a short yet complex history in its two hundred and twenty-four years. She has produced millions and millions of great individuals. These great minds have shaped what America is today. Others, however, have personally molded this magnificent nation with their own acts. John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, John Marshall, Henry Clay and Andrew Jackson are the most influential builders of the United States of America. John Adams was born loyal to the English Crown but evolved into the second President of the Free World. As a lawyer, Adams emerged into politics as an opponent of the Stamp Act and was a leader in the Revolutionary gro ...
    Related: american, american congress, american history, american revolution, american system, history, influential
  • A Boy Of Scotchirish Descent, Whose Ancestors Had Settled In Pennsylvania Before Travelling Through Mountains To Resettle In - 530 words
    A boy of Scotch-Irish descent, whose ancestors had settled in Pennsylvania before travelling through mountains to resettle in southern territory, he was born in 1782 in the Abbeville district of South Carolina on March 18. His family was not rich, nor were they poor; they owned slaves and were regarded not as a part of the ostentation associated with slave-holding at the time but rather as a simple, farm family. His father had an interest in politics and participated locally, something that ultimately catapulted this boy into his future profession. Sent at the age of 12 to live with a Presbyterian minister for a basic education, he was eventually trained at Yale beginning his junior year and ...
    Related: ancestors, mountains, pennsylvania, travelling, fundamental principles
  • A Gold Rush Leads To War - 1,304 words
    A Gold Rush Leads to War A Gold Rush Leads to War The American Civil War (1861-1865) and the Reconstruction period that followed were the bloodiest chapters of American history to date. Brother fought brother as the population was split along sectional lines. The issue of slavery divided the nation's people and the political parties that represented them in Washington. The tension which snapped the uneasy truce between north and south began building over slavery and statehood debates in California. In 1848, settlers discovered gold at Sutter's Mill, starting a mass migration. By 1849, California had enough citizens to apply for statehood. However, the debate over whether the large western st ...
    Related: gold rush, rush, senate race, democratic party, invalid
  • A Gold Rush Leads To War - 1,266 words
    ... and Britain gave up any serious hopes of a Confederate victory. With Britain's vote of confidence also went the possibility of European support for the Confederacy. Without this vital link with the outside world, the Confederacy lost all advantage in the war. Amidst all the turmoil of the Civil War, Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863, ending slavery in all territories, including the South, which Lincoln continued to insist was under Union jurisdiction. Recognition of the Proclamation became a required element of Lincoln's "ten-percent plan", whereby 10% of the population of any seceded state could reform the state government and apply for readmission ...
    Related: gold rush, rush, radical republicans, robert e lee, alabama
  • A History Of Christianity In Egypt - 1,135 words
    ... s the Thracian) however, responded by increasing persecutions in his territory of Egypt. The story is told that once before the Battle of Milvian Bridge (by which Constantine took complete control of the Western Empire) when the odds were greatly against him, Constantine beseeched God for help, praying in the Christian fashion, and won the day. He later adopted the Chi-Rho, a stylized monogram of the first letters of "Christus," as his standard, and led his armies to victory after victory. Because of this, Constantine was even more well-disposed towards the Christians, though he himself was not baptized a Christian until his deathbed. In 313 together with Licinius, the eastern Augustus, ...
    Related: christianity, egypt, history, asia minor, holy land
  • A Journey Though The Golden Gates Of Promise - 2,246 words
    A Journey Though the "Golden Gates" of Promise Great controversy exists over the true promises of the "Golden Gates" in the United States. Discrimination occurs with different ethnic groups, but for those immigrants permitted into the country, the opportunities are excellent. The laws and practices established to control immigration into the United States limit the amount of poverty that can be present in the country. Without these important practices and laws created by the United States Congress, "cheap" labor would overpower American citizen labor and lead the country to an economic and social catastrophe. Although the United States is often criticized for its establishment of immigration ...
    Related: golden, promise, north america, east africa, testimony
  • A Patriarchal World Assimilation - 1,578 words
    A Patriarchal World --Assimilation A Patriarchal World John Bodnar says it well when he suggests that the center of everyday life was to be found in the family-household. It was here that past values and present realities were reconciled, examined on an intelligible scale, evaluated and mediated. This assertion implies that the immigrant family-household is the vehicle of assimilation. I will take this assertion a step further and examine more specifically the powerful role of the patriarchal father within Anzia Yezierska's book Bread Givers and Barry Levinson's film Avalon. Yezierska's theme vividly depicts the constraint of a patriarchal world, while Levinson illustrates the process of ass ...
    Related: assimilation, old world, patriarchal, jewish american, more important
  • A Rough Man - 1,341 words
    A Rough Man Rough, vigorous, hot-tempered and rich is what Mark Twain grew up to be. Born 1835 in Missouri, Florida he always did what he needed to in order for him to reach his goal. Even though he dropped out of school at the age of twelve, when his father died, he accomplished numerous things. Mark began writing when he took the job of a journalist. The tale 'The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County' was his first success. After a trip by boat to Palestine, he wrote The Innocents Abroad. As his writing career blossomed, he also became successful as a lecturer. In 1870 got married, and a few years later he and his wife settled in Hartford, Connecticut. Huckleberry Finn is Twain's ma ...
    Related: rough, mysterious stranger, gilded age, point of view, imagination
  • A Separate Peace: Chapter 1 - 5,662 words
    ... truth, the shadowy, elusive truth of an instant that is already beginning to fade in memory. Gene is about to make a full confession--or he thinks he is--when Dr. Stanpole and the nurse arrive. The following day Finny is sent home to recuperate. The summer session comes to an end, appropriately enough for Gene, for until now summer had represented freedom, sports, and running outdoors, with Finny as the light and life of it all. Now all that has changed. A month later, after a sojourn at home, Gene heads back to school for his senior year. On the way he makes a detour to call on Finny. NOTE: The "surprise" reunion is no surprise to Finny, who appears to have been waiting anxiously in hop ...
    Related: separate peace, ultimate punishment, last time, self awareness, burning
  • A Study Of Jack Londons Belief In Darwinism - 614 words
    A Study of Jack Londons Belief in Darwinism Jack London has a strong belief in Darwinism, survival of the fittest, during the late 1800s through the early 1900s, when he wrote. Throughout his writings, many characters display Londons belief in Darwinism. In the novel, The Call of the Wild, Jack Londons belief in the Darwinian Jungle is portrayed by animals interacting with humans, each other, and the environment. This can be shown through Buck, a house dog turned sled dog, interacting with his masters, other dogs, and the Yukon wilderness. As Buck travels from master to master throughout the course of the novel he learns, through trial and error, what behavior brings rewards, and that which ...
    Related: darwinism, jack, jack london, after life, late 1800s
  • A Summary Of Portugese History In Ceylon 15061631 - 1,200 words
    A summary of Portugese History in Ceylon (1506-1631) A Summary of Portugese History in Ceylon (1506-1631) The first Portuguese visiting Ceylon was Dom Lourenço de Almeida in 1505 or 1506. Accidentally, after a storm, adverse winds drove him to the island's coast near Galle. In the last months of the years 1505 or 1506 Dom Lourenço's fleet anchored off Colombo. A memorial of this first landing was erected on a boulder overlooking the Bay of Colombo.The Portuguese called it a "Padrao" and a cross above the Royal Arms of Portugal surmounted it. This landmark was still seen in 1920 (now?) bearing the inexplicable date of 1501.This first expedition admittedly built a wooden chapel a ...
    Related: ceylon, history, summary, king philip, santa barbara
  • A Victim Of The Double Rape - 1,601 words
    A Victim of the Double Rape There is an old saying that goes "behind every strong man is a strong woman". This proverb can be used to describe the legacy of Hernando Cortes and his conquest of Mexico. Like the proverb, he had someone behind him who aided in his goals of dominance. The woman was Dona Marina, otherwise known as La Malinche. Her beauty and intelligence made her into one of the most hated and influential women in Mexico's history. According to Clifford Krauss, "La Malinche is for the most part portrayed as the perpetrator of Mexico's original sin" (110). La Malinche was a victim of a "double rape" (Todorov 49). Her destiny was determined at birth. As a child growing up in native ...
    Related: double, rape, spanish culture, female sexuality, refer
  • Aaron Burr Treason Trial - 1,364 words
    ... pt Wilkinson was the only real traitor in this story ... but he hadn't made Thomas Jefferson his personal enemy. Wilkinson's role in Burr's plan was to lead Burr's army of mercenaries against Mexico. In exchange, Burr would help Wilkinson become governor of the Louisiana territory (which he did) and compensate him with lands gained from Mexico. When Burr's plan was uncovered, and Wilkinson learned that President Jefferson had heard of the plot, he quickly wrote Jefferson a letter admitting everything hoping to gain indemnity in exchange for testifying against Burr. Jefferson first heard about Burr's plan on December 1st, 1805. But for a full year he did nothing. This has led many histori ...
    Related: aaron, aaron burr, burr, treason, trial
  • Abortion - 2,032 words
    Abortion Abortion in today's society has become very political. You are either pro-choice or pro-life, and there doesn't seem to be a happy medium. As we look at abortion and research its history, should it remain legal in the United States, or should it be outlawed to reduce the ever growing rate of abortion. A choice should continue to exist but the emphasis needs to be placed on education of the parties involved. James C. Mohr takes a good look at abortion in his book Abortion in America. He takes us back in history to the 1800s so we can understand how the practice and legalization of abortion has changed over the year. In the absence of any legislation whatsoever on the subject of abort ...
    Related: abortion, induced abortion, court cases, civil war, affluent
  • Abraham Lincoln - 1,117 words
    Abraham Lincoln Abraham Lincoln, the 16th president of the United States, guided his country through the most devastating experience in its national history--the Civil War. He is considered by many historians to have been the greatest American president. Early Life Lincoln was born on Feb. 12, 1809, in a log cabin in Hardin (now Larue) County, Ky. Indians had killed his grandfather, Lincoln wrote, "when he was laboring to open a farm in the forest" in 1786; this tragedy left his father, Thomas Lincoln, "a wandering laboring boy" who "grew up, litterally [sic] without education." Thomas, nevertheless, became a skilled carpenter and purchased three farms in Kentucky before the Lincolns left th ...
    Related: abraham, abraham lincoln, lincoln, mary todd lincoln, nancy hanks lincoln, thomas lincoln, todd lincoln
  • Abraham Lincoln - 1,088 words
    ... in acceptance of the Republican senatorial nomination (June 16, 1858) Lincoln suggested that Douglas, Chief Justice Roger B. Taney, and Democratic presidents Franklin Pierce and James Buchanan had conspired to nationalize slavery. In the same speech he expressed the view that the nation would become either all slave or all free: "A house divided against itself cannot stand." The underdog in the senatorial campaign, Lincoln wished to share Douglas's fame by appearing with him in debates. Douglas agreed to seven debates: in Ottawa, Freeport, Jonesboro, Charleston, Galesburg, Quincy, and Alton, Ill. Lincoln knew that Douglas--now fighting the Democratic Buchanan administration over the cons ...
    Related: abraham, abraham lincoln, lincoln, second inaugural address, south carolina
  • Abraham Of Chaldea - 1,547 words
    Abraham of Chaldea Annonymous The following is a narrative description on the life and times of one of the most powerful characters in the Old Testament. Abraham was indeed a man of God in a time where few men believed in the One true God. Through many triumphs and errors, he always returned to God to lead him back to his calling. His dedication resulted in great promises from God that were eventually fulfilled and affect each of our lives today. His story is our story. Abraham was a native of Chaldea, and a ninth generation descendant of Shem, the son of Noah. He was born on the southern tip of the Tigris and Uuphrates rivers in the city of Ur around 2161BC.1 Before his name was changed to ...
    Related: abraham, most high, unknown territory, maker, valley
  • Act 1 - 1,272 words
    ... ook of Devotions and assumes that she is really reading. The prince asks her to pray for him. After some talking Ophelia says that she has received gifts from him but Hamlet pronounce that he never sent gifts and that he never loved her and questions her honesty. They end the conversation with Hamlet telling Ophelia to enter a nunnery. After Hamlet leaves the King and Polonius join Ophelia. Claudius is somewhat convinced that the affliction is not because of love. The king thinks that the situation will not harm him the king is thinking of sending Hamlet to England. Polonius still fells that it is love that is problemming Hamlet however he endorses the Kings decision. Polonius then sugge ...
    Related: good night, claudius hamlet, small group, denmark
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