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  • Arthur Miller And Tennessee Williams, Including A Streetcar Named Desire - 4,340 words
    Arthur Miller and Tennessee Williams, including A Streetcar Named Desire (1947, film, 1951) and Death of a Salesman (1949). He directed the Academy Award-winning films Gentleman's Agreement (1947) and On The Waterfront (1954), as well as East of Eden (1955), A Face in the Crowd (1957), Splendor in the Grass (1961), and The Last Tycoon (1976). His two autobiographical novels, America, America (1962) and The Arrangement (1967), were turned into films in 1963 and 1968. Bibliography: Koszarski, Richard, Hollywood Directors, 1941-1976 (1977). Jolson, Al -------------------------------- (johl'-suhn) The singer Al Jolson, b. Asa Yoelson in Lithuania, c.1886, d. Oct. 23, 1950, immigrated with his fa ...
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  • Arthur Miller And Tennessee Williams, Including A Streetcar Named Desire - 4,269 words
    ... g the subject matter of Face to Face (1975) overly familiar and rating his English-language The Serpent's Egg (1977) an overall failure. Autumn Sonata (1978) and From the Life of the Marionettes (1980) were critical successes, however, although the latter failed at the box office. Fanny and Alexander (1983), a rich and fantastic portrait of childhood in a theatrical family, was regarded as one of his finest films and won an Academy Award for best foreign language film of 1983. Subsequently, Bergman directed After the Rehearsal (1984), his meditation on a life in the theater. WILLIAM S. PECHTER Bibliography: Bergman, Ingmar, Bergman on Bergman (1973); Cowie, Peter, Ingmar Bergman: A Criti ...
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  • Tennessee Williams - 1,352 words
    Tennessee Williams The playwright, Tennessee Williams, allows the main characters in the plays A Streetcar Named Desire and The Glass Menagerie to live miserable lives which they try to deny and later change. The downfall and denial of the Southern gentlewoman is a common theme in both plays. The characters, Blanche from A.S.N.D. and Amanda from T.G.M., are prime examples of this concept. Both Blanche and Amanda have had many struggles in their lives and go through even more through out the rest of the plays. The problem is that Williams never lets the two women work through and move on from these problems. The two ladies are allowed to destroy themselves and he invites us to watch them in t ...
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  • Tennessee Williams 1911 1983 - 647 words
    Tennessee Williams (1911 1983) Thomas Lanier Williams was born on March 26, 1911 in Columbus, Mississippi. The second of three children, his family life was full of tension. His parents, a shoe salesman and the daughter of a minister, often engaged in violent arguments that frightened his sister Rose. In 1927, Williams got his first taste of literary fame when he took third place in a national essay contest sponsored by The Smart Set magazine. In 1929, he was admitted to the University of Missouri where he saw a production of Henrik Ibsen's Ghosts and decided to become a playwright. But his degree was interrupted when his father forced him to withdraw from college and work at the Internatio ...
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  • Tennessee Williams And The Southern Belle - 2,098 words
    Tennessee Williams And The Southern Belle Mary Ellen P. Evans Dana Smith THEA 393 11/23/99 Tennessee Williams and the Southern Belle And such girls! . . . more grace, more elegance, more refinement, more guileless purity, were never found in the whole world over, in any age, not even that of the halcyon . . . so happy was our peculiar social system- there was about these country girls . . . mischief . . . spirit . . . fire . . . archness, coquetry, and bright winsomeness- tendrils these of a stock that was strong and true as heart could wish or nature frame; for in strong and true as heart could wish or nature frame; for in the essentials their character was based upon confiding, trusting, l ...
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  • Tennessee Williams And The Southern Belle - 2,049 words
    ... remember one Sunday afternoon in Blue Mountain . . . your mother received- seventeen! - gentlemen callers! Why, sometimes there weren't chairs enough to accommodate them all . . . Among my callers were some of the most prominent young planters of the Mississippi Delta- planters and sons of planters! There was young Champ Laughlin who later became Vice President of the Delta Planters Bank. Hadley Stevenson who was drowned in Moon Lake and left his widow one hundred and fifty thousand in Government bonds . . . (Jacobus 129) Within this world of memory and illusion, Amanda tries to hold the family together, economically and spiritually. Her husband's desertion of her and the family was the ...
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  • Tennessee Williams Summer And Smoke - 992 words
    Tennessee Williams` Summer And Smoke The most striking feature of Tennessee Williams Summer and Smoke as performed at the Guthrie Theater was the transformation of the characters. There are several elements that reflect this transformation. These elements are set, costumes and character mannerisms, which are all symbolic. As a result of these complexities, the audience is exposed to a very deep and meaningful production. Summer and Smoke illustrates the transformation of the human mind and body through eloquent symbolic subtleties that are present through out the play. The set is a powerful tool in the hands of it's designer. The feel of a set to the audience and the characters is an importa ...
    Related: smoke, tennessee, tennessee williams, human mind, human body
  • The Glass Menagerie By Tennessee Williams - 717 words
    The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams The play The Glass Menagerie, by Tennessee Williams, Williams uses many symbols which represent many different things. Many of the symbols used in the play try to symbolize some form of escape or difference between reality and illusion. The first symbol, presented in the first scene, is the fire escape. This represents the "bridge" between the illusory world of the Wingfields and the world of reality. This "bridge" seems to be a one way passage. But the direction varies for each character. For Tom, the fire escape is the way out of the world of Amanda and Laura and an entrance into the world of reality. For Laura, the fire escape is a way into her wo ...
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  • A Streetcar Named Desire - 782 words
    A Streetcar Named Desire A Streetcar Named Desire Tennessee Williams is known for his powerfully written psychological dramas. Most of his works are set in the southern United States and they usually portray neurotic people who are victims of their own passions, frustrations, and loneliness. The play represents the conflict between the sensitive, neurotic Blanche DuBois and the crude, animalistic Stanley Kowalski. Blanche visits the home of her sister, Stella, in New Orleans and that is when Stanley started picking at her, almost testing her. Before she had met Stanley, she told her sister of how their plantation had been lost due to the costs of paying for the funerals of many family member ...
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  • A Streetcar Named Desire - 1,024 words
    ... ords used by Williams. In the first scene Blanche is described as "daintily dressed" and mentions that she is "incongruous to her setting" (Williams 96). Blanche cannot adapt to her surroundings, but instead tries to change them. Later in the story she says "You saw it before I came. Well, look at it now! This room is almost-dainty!" (Williams 176). By using the word dainty in both places Williams shows us how Blanche tries to change her surrounding to match her, instead of adapting to them. This will not work with Stanley. Blanche deceives everyone for a good portion of the play. However, Stanley is continually trying to find her true history. Blanche says "I don't want realism. I want ...
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  • A Streetcar Named Desire Symbols - 1,005 words
    A Streetcar Named Desire - Symbols Tennessee Williams was once quoted as saying "Symbols are nothing but the natural speech of drama...the purest language of plays" . This is clearly evident in A Streetcar Named Desire, one of Williamss many plays. In analyzing the main character of the story, Blanche DuBois, it is crucial to use both the literal text as well as the symbols of the story to get a complete and thorough understanding of her. Before one can understand Blanches character one must understand the reason why she moves to New Orleans and joins her sister, Stella, and brother-in-law, Stanley. By analyzing the symbolism in the first scene, one can understand what prompted Blanche to mo ...
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  • A Streetcar Named Desire Symbols - 1,024 words
    ... rds used by Williams. In the first scene Blanche is described as "daintily dressed" and mentions that she is "incongruous to her setting" (Williams 96). Blanche cannot adapt to her surroundings, but instead tries to change them. Later in the story she says "You saw it before I came. Well, look at it now! This room is almost-dainty!" (Williams 176). By using the word dainty in both places Williams shows us how Blanche tries to change her surrounding to match her, instead of adapting to them. This will not work with Stanley. Blanche deceives everyone for a good portion of the play. However, Stanley is continually trying to find her true history. Blanche says "I dont want realism. I want ma ...
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  • Ancient Art Of Parenthood - 1,602 words
    Ancient Art Of Parenthood Children walk home from school every day and never realize what lurks beyond their protected space (Miller 105). In todays world the acceptance of latch key children should not be tolerated. Unfortunately, our society condones such behavior from the adults. As a result, these children wear a chain around their neck with a house key attached, in order to enter into their home. As the youngsters leave school, they enter a silent world (Kay 94). To illustrate, children enter into an empty house which has been abandoned since breakfast that morning. Therefore, television when turned on, replaces the absence of their parents. At this time, children experience serious con ...
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  • Blance Dubois - 1,186 words
    Blance Dubois Blanche DuBois in A Streetcar Named Desire is to some extent living an unreal existence. Jonathan Briggs, book critic for the Clay County Freepress. In Tennessee Williams' play, A Streetcar Named Desire the readers are introduced to a character named Blanche DuBois. Blanche is Stella's younger sister who has come to visit Stella and her husband Stanley in New Orleans. After their first meeting Stanley develops a strong dislike for Blanche and everything associated with her. Among the things Stanley dislikes about Blanche are her spoiled-girl manners and her indirect and quizzical way of conversing. Stanley also believes that Blanche has conned him and his wife out of the family ...
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  • Carson Mccullers - 1,564 words
    Carson McCullers "With poignant insight and compassion Carson McCullers (1917-1967) wrote of human loneliness, unfulfilled love, and the frailty of the human heart." Of all the characters in the work of Carson McCullers, the one who seemed to her family and friends to be most like the author herself was Frankie Addams: the vulnerable, exasperating, and endearing adolescent of The Member of the Wedding who was looking for the "we of me." However, Carson once said that was, or became in the process of writing, all the characters in her work. This is probable true of most real writers who often with pain draw from their unconscious what the rest of us would just as soon keep hidden from ourselv ...
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  • Cat On A Hot Tin Roof - 1,722 words
    Cat On A Hot Tin Roof English Literature - 'Cat on a Hot Tin Roof by Tennessee Williams. Describe the relationship between Maggie and Brick. When the play opens, we are introduced to a pretty young woman who is shouting. This woman, goes by the name of Margaret, and lets the audience know right from the beginning that if ever she has a problem, she'll let you know about it. As we read through the first Act of this three Act play, we learn very quickly that the relationship between Margaret, and her husband Brick is one sided - with all the effort coming from Maggie. It is clear their relationship wouldn't be considered 'normal' because of their attitudes towards each other, or rather, Brick' ...
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  • Cat On Hot Tin Roof By Williams - 1,290 words
    Cat On Hot Tin Roof By Williams The dominant morality in Tennessee Williams "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" can not be discussed in terms of a single, easy-to-understand theme. Rather, I detected a number of disturbing themes in this play which, unfortunately, also seem to be present in our modern society. These themes explain much of the behavior we see today, both in our elected officials and in our own private lives. They include the willingness to engage in back-stabbing and flattery to get what we want, the attempt to escape reality by indulging in alcohol and drugs, the tendency for married couples to remaining together in meaningless or even violent relationships, and the tendency of people w ...
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  • Comp Essay Street Car Named Desire - 1,466 words
    Comp. Essay Street Car Named Desire Struggles Within: A Comparison of Amanad Wingfield And Blanche Dubois In today's rough and tough world, there seems to be no room for failure. The pressure to succeed in life sometimes seems unreasonable. Others often set expectations for people too high. This forces that person to develop ways to take the stress and tension out of their lives in their own individual ways. In the plays "The Glass Menagerie" and " A Streetcar Named Desire" written by Tennessee Williams, none of the characters are capable of living in the present and facing reality. Two of the characters are Amanda Wingfield and Blache Dubios. In order for these characters to deal with the p ...
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  • Conflicts In Relationships - 1,671 words
    Conflicts in Relationships by James Carvill In Othello, the Moor of Venice by Shakespeare, A Doll House by Henrik Ibsen, Oedipus Rex by Sophocles, and The Glass Managerie by Tennessee Williams involve relationships and the development of the characters through conflicts in their relationships. For Othello it was Iagos deception and Othellos jealousy, and for Nora and Torvald in A Doll House it was their doomed marriage, In Oedipus Rex the prophecy doomed Oedipus to marry his mother, and in The Glass Managerie it was the Lauras special condition and the love she feels for Jim OConnor and the dependence on her brother Tom. Throughout Shakespeares Othello, the Moor of Venice the character of Ot ...
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  • Death Of Salesman And Crucible - 5,614 words
    ... tured Death of a Salesman to show Willy Loman's pleasures, dreams, and hopes of the past. Thus the central conflict of the play is Willy's inability to differentiate between reality and illusion. In the opening of the play numerous otifs are presented. The first being the melody of a flute which suggests a distant, faraway fantasy: Willy's dream world. This is playing in the background as Willy enters carrying his burdensome traveling suitcases. He has been a traveling salesma for the Wagner Company for thirty-four years. Willy left that morning for a trip and has already returned. He tells his wife Linda that he opened the windshield of the car to let the warm air in and was quietly dri ...
    Related: crucible, death of a salesman, salesman, the crucible, the jungle
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