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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: sub saharan africa

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  • Aids - 462 words
    Aids AIDS: Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome HIV and Aids affect more than roughly thirty million people worldwide. Race, sex and age have nothing to do with who can get this disease, however, the race with the highest number of infected people happens to be Caucasian males ages 25-44. About forty-five percent of the 641,000 AIDS cases in the U.S. have been white people. Blacks arent far behind with over 35 percent of cases, and Hispanics have about 20 percent of all cases. Asians have less than anyone does, with 1 percent. Of the estimated 30.6 million people worldwide living with this horrible, life-threatening disease in 1997, about 68 percent were living in sub-Saharan Africa. 22 perce ...
    Related: aids, latin america, eastern asia, saharan africa, asia
  • Aids As An Invader - 1,827 words
    Aids As An Invader Acquired immune deficiency syndrome, also known as AIDS, is a silent invader. The first cases of this disease were reported in the early 1980s. AIDS is caused by the infection known as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which is a microscopic organism that can grow and multiply inside living cells. HIV attacks and disables the bodys immune system. The immune system is the system that usually fights off illnesses. When the immune system breaks down, a person with AIDS will develop life-threatening illnesses. (Flynn & Lound, 6) The invasion of the AIDS virus in an individuals body leaves the body open to an invasion by many other different infections, called opportunistic d ...
    Related: aids, western europe, acquired immune deficiency syndrome, saharan africa, infected
  • Aids In Africa - 1,109 words
    Aids In Africa As recently as 1990, there were some regions of the world that had remained relatively unscathed by AIDS. Today, however, there is not a single country around the world which has wholly escaped the AIDS epidemic. As the epidemic has matured, some of the developed nations which were hard hit by the epidemic in the 1980s such as the United States have reported a slowing in the rate of new infections and a stabilization among existing cases with lower mortality rates and an extension of post-diagnosis lifespan. However, despite the changing face of the global AIDS pandemic, one factor remains unchanged: no region of the world bears a higher AIDS-related burden than sub-Saharan Af ...
    Related: africa, aids, aids epidemic, east africa, saharan africa, sub-saharan africa, west africa
  • Aids In Africa - 1,093 words
    ... condoms and/or other barrier contraceptives, and reduced sexual frequency (Zaba & Gregson, 1998; Gregson, et al., 1999). Biological and behavioral factors among HIV+ men may also impact the fertility rates. In general, researchers have noted that biological factors, including reduced sperm count and reduced frequency of sexual activity related to physical illness, have been more important than behavioral factors (condom use, etc.) when examining males' contributions to the declining fertility rates (Zaba & Gregson, 1998). Orphanhood & Early Childhood Mortality. The data on child mortality and AIDS are more confusing. There is no doubt that AIDS has had a devastating impact on children i ...
    Related: africa, aids, aids epidemic, aids prevention, foreign aid, saharan africa, sub-saharan africa
  • Aids In Africa - 462 words
    Aids In Africa Horrors in the news Action on AIDS in Africa Imagine 40 million hungry and destitute orphans in sub-Saharan Africa by the year 2010 roaming the streets without schooling and work, prime candidates for the criminal gangs, marauding militias and child armies that have slaughtered and mutilated tens of thousands of civilians in countries like sierra Leone and Liberia in the last decade. This is the kind of nightmare that prompted the united nations security council to convene yesterday for an unprecedented examination of health issue- the global spread of ADIS, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, where experts predict that more people will die off AIDS, in the next decade than have ...
    Related: africa, aids, aids prevention, saharan africa, south africa, sub-saharan africa
  • Aids In Detail - 2,050 words
    AIDS In Detail Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Today, despite the continuing production of better antibiotics since the discovery of penicillin, we are facing an infectious disease against which all these drugs are virtually powerless. This disease is spreading inexorably, killing more people and more people each year. AIDS does not know no national boundaries and does not discriminate by race or sex. It is rampaging not only throughout the United States, but also through Africa, India, China, Russia, Europe, South America, and the Caribbean countries. Even infants and children are at risk. AIDS is similar to the bubonic plague or the "BLACK DEATH" that killed perhaps one-third in ...
    Related: aids, aids epidemic, infectious disease, human immunodeficiency, purple
  • Aids Related Stigma Since The Appearance Of Aids In The Late Seventies And Early Eighties, The Disease Has Had Attached To It - 1,545 words
    AIDS Related Stigma Since the appearance of AIDS in the late seventies and early eighties, the disease has had attached to it a significant social stigma. This stigma has manifested itself in the form of discrimination, avoidance and fear of people living with AIDS (PLWAs). As a result, the social implications of the disease have been extended from those of other life threatening conditions to the point at which PLWAs are not only faced with a terminal illness but also social isolation and constant discrimination throughout society. Various explanations have been suggested as to the underlying causes of this stigmatization. Many studies point to the relationship the disease has with deviant ...
    Related: aids, aids epidemic, early years, seventies, stigma
  • Bahrain - 1,610 words
    Bahrain Table of Contents Section Page History 3 Cultural and Societal 5 Education 10 Business Climate 12 Government and Military 16 OVERVIEW OF BAHRAIN History of Bahrain Bahrain was once part of the ancient civilization of Dilmun and served as an important link in trade routes between Sumeria and the Indus Valley as much as 5000 years ago. Since the late 18th century Bahrain has been governed by the Al-Khalifa family, which created close ties to Britain by signing the General Treaty of Peace in 1820. A binding treaty of protection, known as the Perpetual Truce of Peace and Friendship, was concluded in 1861 and further revised in 1892 and 1951. This treaty was similar to those entered into ...
    Related: bahrain, world war ii, medieval europe, different ways, sixth
  • Cocacola From Then To Now - 2,211 words
    ... project-management applications, production and materials management, quality management and plant maintenance, as well as sales and distribution management. Initially around 5,000 users will have access to SAP applications which will eventually increase to 25,000 users throughout Coca-Cola. Rick Engum, VP of Information Services at Coca-Cola Enterprises Inc. in Atlanta states the following in regards to SAP : These applications will speed the process of doing business with our suppliers and give us better management of our overall supply chain. By using common applications all of us in the Coca-Cola system will provide a consistent level of service [such as timely deliveries] to custome ...
    Related: saharan africa, project management, cola company, cola, chronicle
  • Cryptococcus Neoformans - 1,879 words
    Cryptococcus Neoformans BackgroundThe organism C neoformans is an encapsulated yeast; its environmental niche has not been completely defined, although outbreaks of disease have been associated in particular with pigeon roosts and other large contaminated sites. There are two varieties of C neoformans, distinguished by antigenic differences in the outer capsule of the organism: serotypes A and D (C neoformans var neoformans, the most common strain) and serotypes B and C (C neoformans var gatti). Cryptococcus neoformans var neoformans is the principal pathogen in patients with AIDS. Cryptococcus neoformans var gatti, which is found predominantly in Australia, Asia, and Southern California, ha ...
    Related: nervous system, sub-saharan africa, immunodeficiency syndrome, implicated, organ
  • Eastern Djibouti - 269 words
    Eastern Djibouti The country of Eastern Djibouti is located in eastern sub-Saharan Africa near the countries of Ethiopia and Sudan. The government of this nation takes after that of World War II Italy in that it is a fascist dictatorship. Eastern Djibouti is led by the militarys top official, General Ryan Schutte. The economic situation in this country is bleak. Large businesses bribe the corrupt government in order to keep their share of the market. There are only two classes of people in this country: the extremely rich and the very poor. The poor are mostly farm or factory workers who earn barely enough survive. Civil war is a constant threat although it has never happened due to the gove ...
    Related: eastern, civil war, saharan africa, sub-saharan africa, africa
  • Great Zimbabwe - 820 words
    GREAT ZIMBABWE GREAT ZIMBABWE This article which I have chosen to read, is about a ruined city of southeast Zimbabwe south of Harare. Great Zimbabwe is an ancient city on the plateau in sub-Saharan Africa. Great Zimbabwe was supposedly a city that controlled much trade and culture of southern Africa during the 12th and 17th centuries because it was stationed on the shortest route between the northern gold fields, and the Indian Ocean. Archaeologists believed that this masterful stonework was built somewhere around 1100 and 1600 A.D. Great Zimbabwe covers 1,779 acres and is made up of 3 main structures. The first one is the Hill Complex; Hill Complex is the oldest part of the site. The hill w ...
    Related: zimbabwe, late 1800s, saharan africa, ancient cities, tribe
  • Hiv - 1,302 words
    Hiv Today, our world is faced with many diseases. Some havent been discovered and some have no cures. The immune system fights off many of these diseases, but what happens when it fails us? One of the most deadly, incurable disease the world is faced with today is the Human Immunodeficency Virus (HIV). There is no none cure yet. Viruses cause colds and the flu. Viruses are microscopic particles that invade the cells of plants, animals, fungi, and bacteria. They often destroy the cells they invade. How do viruses reproduce? A virus first enters a cell in one of three ways: direct penetration, endocytosis, or membrane fusion. The virus takes over the cells machinery and is thus forced to make ...
    Related: life expectancy, life cycle, breast feeding, wound
  • Hiv Multiple Bereavement Syndrome - 1,987 words
    Hiv & Multiple Bereavement Syndrome HIV/AIDS and Multiple Bereavement: Is the psychological impact of multiple loss intensified by social factors? "The advent of AIDS has created a new population of people who suffer multiple bereavements as well as threats to their own lives." (Murray-Parkes, 1998, p. xii) The populations most affected by HIV/AIDS live in two geographical locations: the USA and Africa (WHO, 1998) . In 1997 four million people in the Sub-Saharan Africa were newly reported as having seropositive status (WHO, 1998). In North America this figure was 44 thousand (WHO, 1998). Seropositive rates among Gay men in New York City are reported at 36 to 67% (Dean L, 1995). Infection rat ...
    Related: bereavement, multiple, syndrome, financial resources, york city
  • Imperialism - 1,550 words
    Imperialism Throughout time more powerful countries have extended their influence over weaker countries and then colonized those countries to expand their own power. Imperialism causes the stronger countries to grow and become nations or even empires. There are many examples throughout European history of nations enveloping weaker countries and increasing their own wealth and power to form strong nation-states and even empires. Through imperialism one culture is invading another culture and most of the time the European colonialists are not thinking about the effects this invasion might have on the natives of that land. Problems caused by imperialism have prevailed to this day. Imperialism c ...
    Related: european imperialism, imperialism, multimedia encyclopedia, great britain, implement
  • Jonathan N Dukes - 1,683 words
    Jonathan N. Dukes December 1, 1999 Health / 6th Period Ms. J Thesis: The AIDS and HIV viruses are getting worse in the United States and the rest of the world. Introduction Although more people die of heart disease and cancer each year, AIDS has become the health problem people fear the most. Much of the fear comes from ignorance and misunderstanding. Education is the most effective tool against AIDS. It is more important than ever for young people to learn the facts about AIDS. Many teenagers don't know anyone who has AIDS. It is hard for them to believe they are at risk. It is a fact that the incidence of AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases is on a rapid rise among teens and peopl ...
    Related: jonathan, common sense, prevention methods, blood cells, pneumonia
  • Should The Developed North Increase Aid To The Less Developed South - 1,001 words
    ... ernments spend money. Economies are also worsening because assistance is spent on consumption and expanding the government rather than investing it or benefiting the poor. In other words, money is consumed rather than used wisely because it is often stolen by the corrupt elite ruling classes of the developing countries and used for personal uses. A prime example of this includes Zaire and its infamous ruler Mobutu Sese Seko. Estimates suggest that Sese Seko stole over 4 billion dollars of foreign aid over a 24-year period from 1970-1994. This 4 billion accounted for over of all aid given to the country during that time. However, during the twenty-four year period, the IMF continued to o ...
    Related: developed world, sub-saharan africa, higher education, national defense, instability
  • The African Lion - 1,079 words
    The African Lion The lion is known as king of the jungle because of its huge size and ferocious appearance, the most common type of lion is the African lion. The African lion has the genus species Panthera (panther, leopard) leo (lion). Panthera leo has the common name lion and comes from the felidae family. Panthera leo is in the mammali class and has the order carnivora(Bush Gardens, 1996). Lions live in sub-Saharan Africa in grasslands and semi-arid plains in prides which is a group of lions that live in the same area and share hunting duties(Bush Gardens,1996). Lions are the only truly social cat species, usually a pride consists of two males, seven females, and any amount of cubs. The l ...
    Related: african, lion, lion king, the jungle, wild animals
  • The Imf And The Bretton Woods Agreements - 2,012 words
    ... verseas branches to continue their foreign lending. Lairson writes, because no single state could regulate it effectively and because of the unceasing U.S. payments deficits, a Euromarket system developed consisting of the dollar and other currencies, a system of bank credit, and a Eurobond market (bonds denominated in dollars floated outside the United States). A massive volume of funds emerged that, without much restriction, could move across borders in search of the highest yields available on a global basis. The emergence of this new, unregulated concentration of capital made even more difficult than before for the U.S. to get a handle on the system. Lairson suggests that two main re ...
    Related: bretton, bretton woods, woods system, world war ii, africa asia
  • Tuberculosis - 1,054 words
    Tuberculosis Among us today there are thousands of diseases out in the world, most are curable, some don't even have names. Well by the end of this paper you should learn about one more disease called Tuberculosis that will help you understand more about the infectious agents that threaten our lives today and how to control them, especially Tuberculosis. Tuberculosis is the increasingly spreading disease in the world and causes more deaths today then ever before. ( www. homepage.holowww.com) TB Global Emergency)) It kills 8,000 people a day that is 2-3 million people a year. It has surpassed the Aids community overall and is responsible for more deaths among the young and adults in the world ...
    Related: tuberculosis, world health, weight loss, world today, aids
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