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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: spanish colonies

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  • During The 1500s To 1800s, The Strength And Stature Of A - 1,618 words
    During the 1500's to 1800's, the strength and stature of a country depended upon its political power, which can be traced to how self-sufficient it was. Striving to be self-sufficient was what nations sought after; dependency was not a characteristic of a powerful nation. Raw materials were the most required item to strengthen the central government, and deter interactions, such as trade with other nations. The first country to introduce mercantilism in America was Spain. The spanish american colonies were not allowed to trade directly with Europe. Instead they had to funnel all of the sugar and tobacco, two common commdities of the new land, through Spain. When this was done, heavy custom d ...
    Related: stature, english speaking, spanish colonies, taxation without representation, english-speaking
  • History Of Mexico - 801 words
    History of Mexico Before the Spanish Mexico was occupied by a large number of Indian groups with very different social and economic systems. In general the tribes in the north were relatively small groups of hunters and gatherers who roamed large areas of sparsely vegetated deserts and dry lands. These people are often called the Chichimecs, though they were a mixture of several cultural groups who spoke different languages. In the rest of the country the natives were agriculturists, which helped to support the more dense populations. Some of these tribes were the Maya of the Yucatan, Totonac, Huastec, Otomi, Mixtecs, Zapotecs, Tlaxcalans, Tarascans, and Aztecs. Some of these groups made adv ...
    Related: central mexico, history, mexico, mexico city, economic systems
  • Imperialism - 1,025 words
    ... arly 7). What occurred in the Sixteenth century was not so much a discovery of a new world as a meeting of two branches of humanity which had previously been unknown to each other. The European invasions brought much that was radically new in the realm of ideas and values. For instance in agricultural methods including new crops and animals, in technology, the introduction of the wheel, iron, guns, ships, tools, and in the economy where the use of money, profit making and trade were far more developed than in Indian societies (Fagg 99). In both the European and Latin American states the religious establishment was closely involved with the business of government (Fagg 123). Both kinds of ...
    Related: imperialism, high court, spanish conquest, spanish colonies, privileges
  • Jamaica - 1,851 words
    ... found allot farther inland. A few centuries later the lives of these peaceful inhabitants was abruptly disturbed by the savage, war-like carib indians. They began to brutally conquer all of the natives of the other islands as well. But, one day it got even worse for the poor Arawaks. Christopher Columbus, under the Spanish flag, landed there in 1492. This occurrence eventually led to the extinction of the Arawak people in Jamaica. Columbus arrived on May 5, 1494 at St. Ann's Bay with his three ships, the Santa Maria, the Nina and the Pinta. As he landed he remarked "the fairest island that eyes have beheld .... all full of valleys and fields. He named the country "St. Jago" or "Santiago" ...
    Related: jamaica, sierra leone, field trip, south side, preferred
  • Jamie Katzaman April 10, 1996 Columbus And The New World Christianity In The New World The Catholic Church During The Middle - 1,385 words
    ... cely any of the children remained alive a few months afterward. This was due to violence or the disease that the Spanish brought with them. Las Casas on his travels also saw the violence and horrors which the Indians were subject to. Las Casas describes this scene upon entering the Indian village of Caonao: "The Clerico was preparing for the division of the rations amongst the men, when suddenly a Spaniard, prompted, as was thought, by the Devil, drew his sword: the rest drew theirs; and immediately they all began to hack and hew the poor Indians, who were sitting quietly near them, and offering not more resistance than so many sheep". (Liburn 10 & 11) Las Casas then goes on to describe ...
    Related: catholic, catholic church, christianity, christopher columbus, columbus, jamie
  • Monroe Doctrine - 1,566 words
    Monroe Doctrine The Monroe Doctrine can be considered as the United States first major declaration to the world as a fairly new nation. The Monroe Doctrine was a statement of United States policy on the activity and rights of powers in the Western Hemisphere during the early to mid 1800s. The doctrine established the United States position in the major world affairs of the time. Around the time of the Napoleonic Wars in the 1820s, Mexico, Argentina, Chile and Colombia all gained their independence from Spanish control ("Monroe Doctrine" 617). The United States was the first nation to recognize their independence from Spain. The European powers had still considered the new nations as still be ...
    Related: doctrine, james monroe, monroe, monroe doctrine, president james monroe, president monroe
  • Ptolemy - 2,363 words
    ... to the United States in 1871. In the United States he began teaching students that were either deaf, mute or both. He taught by the system called visible speech. This system, was developed by his father, a Scottish educator named Alexander Melville Bell. It shows how the lips, tongue, and throat are used to make sound. In 1872 Bell founded a school for deaf-mutes in Boston, Massachusetts. The school later became part of Boston University, where Bell was appointed professor of vocal physiology. He became a naturalized US citizen in 1882. Ever since the age of 18, Bell had been working on the idea of transmitting speech. In 1874, while working on a multiple telegraph, he developed the basi ...
    Related: ptolemy, human life, poor health, state government, transmitted
  • Utilitarianism Slavery - 1,049 words
    ... over their slaves, which included, by law, the power of life and death. Slavery was also far more necessary to the economy and social system of Rome, than it had been in Greece. The wealthy Romans, often maintaining large city and country homes, depended on numerous slaves for the continuous and efficient operation of these households. Imperial conquests and expansion eventually exhausted the native Roman workforce, so a great number of foreign slaves had to be imported to work the agricultural labor needs. The primary way of acquiring slaves was through war; tens of thousands of captured prisoners of war were brought to Rome as slaves. Other sources of slaves were debtors, who sold the ...
    Related: slavery, slavery in america, utilitarianism, latin america, african people
  • When The Spaniards Came To Settle The New World, Or What Is - 554 words
    When the Spaniards came to settle the New World, or what is now Mexico and Peru, they imposed many new ways and customs for the people living there. These institutions were partially what the Spaniards were used to from living in Spain, and others were simply to live better. The Spaniards imposed many political, economical, and social institutions in the New World never heard of before by the Indians, and many feudal customs and systems that they brought wholly intact from Spain. The political institutions were very important for government functionality in the Spanish colonies. First, a class system similar to that in Spain was reconstructed anew in the colonies. Those in the New World that ...
    Related: settle, spaniards, social institutions, spanish crown, king's
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