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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: society and culture

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  • Disneys Effect On Society And Culture - 708 words
    Disney's Effect On Society And Culture Team Rodent For nearly seven decades Corporate Disney has dazzled its audiences; generation after generation have been entertained through avenues ranging from movies to elaborate theme parks. While many find this massive establishment to be a significant part of American culture and welcome the Disney spirit with open arms, one man in particular looks past the hype and into his own theory of the Disney Corporation. Carl Hiaasen, a journalist for the Miami Herald, paints a witty and sarcastic portrait in this nonfiction account of a company. Hiaasen critizises the company for manifesting evil, enveloping perfection to a sickening extent, and who's sole ...
    Related: american culture, disney corporation, society and culture, world series, performing arts
  • Bahrain - 1,610 words
    Bahrain Table of Contents Section Page History 3 Cultural and Societal 5 Education 10 Business Climate 12 Government and Military 16 OVERVIEW OF BAHRAIN History of Bahrain Bahrain was once part of the ancient civilization of Dilmun and served as an important link in trade routes between Sumeria and the Indus Valley as much as 5000 years ago. Since the late 18th century Bahrain has been governed by the Al-Khalifa family, which created close ties to Britain by signing the General Treaty of Peace in 1820. A binding treaty of protection, known as the Perpetual Truce of Peace and Friendship, was concluded in 1861 and further revised in 1892 and 1951. This treaty was similar to those entered into ...
    Related: bahrain, world war ii, medieval europe, different ways, sixth
  • Can Sociology Be Value Free - 1,275 words
    ... er a disinterested academic one...the tradition thus has a double intent; on the one hand it engages in the primary sociological task of describing and documenting the 'state of society', on the other hand it addresses itself to central social and political issues (Halsey et al 1980 in McNeill 1990 p12) The conclusion that can be drawn from this is that there never has been a value free sociology, just an attempt to merge a value choice with objective research methods (McNeil 1990 p13) During the twentieth century the positivist approach that fostered the hypothetico-deductive mode, although rational in manner came to be seen as coldly logical. In favour, especially since the 1960s, has ...
    Related: free press, sociology, total value, research study, society and culture
  • Child Development - 1,552 words
    Child Development Is development the result of genetics or the result of the love, guidance and the upbringing one receives? That is a very interesting and personal question. In reviewing Table 4.1 in the textbook regarding where the main developmental theories stand on the six themes in development, it appears that most of the theorists involved believe that both nature and nurture have an impact on the development of the child (Child Development: A Thematic Approach (3rd. ed.) (Bukato, Daehler, 1998, p.29). The Ethological theme reports that although behavior is biologically based the environment has an impact and influences behavior patterns. Most of the other themes such as the Learning ...
    Related: child protective, cognitive development, emotional development, intellectual development, language development
  • Communism East Europe - 2,955 words
    ... a contributing factor to the collapse of communism in Eastern Europe. If a party has not got the support of a majority, then it has a weak political basis. The fact that undemocratic means were used to ensure that the communists came to, and then maintained, power shows that communism was a political failure. Throughout the history of communism in Russia, never once did the party gain a majority support or truly succeed in suppressing public demonstrations of antipathy towards communism. It can therefore be argued that a political leadership with no political basis or support could ever hope to survive. Another important factor to note is communisms utter failure in relation to society a ...
    Related: century europe, communism, east europe, east european, east german, east germany, eastern europe
  • Discourse Analysis - 1,627 words
    Discourse Analysis DISCOURSE ANALYSIS This discourse analysis attempts to answer several questions regarding Chairman Hyde's speech against the president. Firstly an attempt has been made to uncover some of the more prevalent themes and discourses in the hope that they will give some kind of enlightenment of American society and culture. Secondly, this analysis describes the many ways in which Chairman Hyde attempts to persuade his audience of his cause. The portrayed image of President Clinton is then focused on, and finally there is a discussion relating to the various social codes implied within Hyde's speech. It has been found that many of these areas overlap to a greater or lesser degre ...
    Related: discourse, american culture, equal justice, higher level, heroism
  • Erik Erikson - 1,883 words
    Erik Erikson Erik Homberger Erikson was born in 1902 near Frankfort, Germany to Danish parents. Erik studied art and a variety of languages during his school years, rather than science courses such as biology and chemistry. He did not prefer the atmosphere that formal schooling produced so instead of going to college he traveled around Europe, keeping a diary of his experiences. After a year of doing this, he returned to Germany and enrolled in art school. After several years, Erickson began to teach art and other subjects to children of Americans who had come to Vienna for Freudian training. He was then admitted into the Vienna Psychoanalytic Institute. In 1933 he came to the U.S. and becam ...
    Related: erik, erik erikson, erikson, pacific coast, society and culture
  • Experiencing Immigration - 1,478 words
    ... ed to practice Jewish religion, many cities erected synagogues and other houses of worship. On New York's East Side alone, 500 Jewish houses of worship were built between 1880 and 1915. (American Identity Explorer, CD-ROM) The Educational Alliance was formed to aid in the transition by offering citizenship classes to adults, cooking and sewing classes, and facilities for young Jewish children. Its aim was to "Americanize and modernize the newcomers and aid in their adjustment. (American Identity Explorer, CD-ROM) Other groups similar to the Alliance included the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society (H.I.A.S), The Hebrew Sheltering Guardian Society, and the Hebrew Free Loan Society. (American Ide ...
    Related: experiencing, immigration, living conditions, east european, wages
  • Female Gential Mutalition - 1,080 words
    ... ions, many girls will develop pelvic inflammatory disease. Some of the infections are due to urine and menstrual retention. Directly following the excision, the girl will almost always have urine retention. This is due to the swelling of the tissues, which causes severe pain during urination. When the girl holds her urine in like this, it can cause urinary tract infections. In addition to retaining urine, she might also retain menstrual blood. The opening that is left behind is at times too small for the blood to escape; thus there is a retention of menstrual blood (Rushwan). After experiencing this operation, many girls find that menstruating alone is intensely torturous. Indeed, some m ...
    Related: female genital mutilation, the girl, african countries, major problem, disorganization
  • From Unilineal Cultural Evolution To Functionalism - 1,037 words
    From Unilineal Cultural Evolution To Functionalism Several anthropological theories emerged during the early twentieth century. Arguably, the most important of these was Functionalism. Bronislaw Malinowski was a prominent anthropologist in Britain during that time and had great influence on the development of this theory. Malinowski suggested that individuals have certain physiological needs and that cultures develop to meet those needs. Malinowski saw those needs as being nutrition, reproduction, shelter, and protection from enemies. He also proposed that there were other basic, culturally derived needs and he saw these as being economics, social control, education, and political organizati ...
    Related: cultural evolution, evolution, functionalism, ruth benedict, social environment
  • Gender Differences In Communication - 966 words
    Gender Differences In Communication Gender Differences in Communication Every race, culture, civilization, and society on this planet shares two things in common: the presence of both the male and female sex, and the need to communicate between the two. The subject of gender differences appears to have engaged peoples curiosity for as long as people have been writing down their thoughts, from as far back as the writing of the creation of Adam and Eve, to its current popular expression in books such as Men are from Mars, Women are from Venus. The assertion that men and women communicate in different ways, about different things, and for different reasons seems to go un-argued and is accepted ...
    Related: communication quarterly, gender, gender differences, gender gap, deborah tannen
  • Good Man Is Hard To Find - 1,424 words
    Good Man Is Hard To Find In Flanney OConners, "A Good Man is Hard to Find" a great deal of irony is used to express her views on how society and culture in the present day and how it has changed from the past. OConnor used the familys grandmother as a key component in the story because of her personality and also because of her old age. She was able to show her feeling about the deterioration of respect for family and elders through the grandmother. The tales idea explores into deeper things then just respect. As the story continues many spiritual observations are made and the regards to how the "old South" views on religion and "common blood" used to be. The beginning of the story is an imp ...
    Related: good man is hard to find, different levels, young children, society and culture, woman
  • Gun Laws - 5,486 words
    Gun Laws States from Michigan to Nebraska to California, as well as the federal government, are considering new rules on letting law-abiding citizens carry guns. Does allowing citizens to carry concealed handguns deter violent crimes? Or does this cause otherwise law-abiding citizens to harm each other? Thirty-one states now have guaranteed their citizens the right to carry concealed handguns if applicants do not have a criminal record or a history of significant mental illness. So what have the results been? The numbers tell the story Using the FBI's crime-rate data for all 3,054 U.S. counties by year from 1977 to 1992, I co-authored a study in the January 1997 Journal of Legal Studies. We ...
    Related: case law, control laws, gun laws, foster care, individual rights
  • How Useful Is The Concept Of Elite To The Distribtion Of Power - 2,552 words
    ... p. 71 - 92 Sociology Essay Terence M. Blackett How useful is the concept of elite for understanding the distribution of power in either Britain or the United States? Introduction In America perhaps only race is a more sensitive subject than the way we sort ourselves out in the struggle for success. The eminent sociologist Robert Merton calls it the structure of opportunity. In the understanding of the usefulness of the term elite, there are some common historical variables, which must be looked at in order to appreciate the power organisms at work even in American society, and how from the days of Thomas Jefferson to the era of Newt Gingrich, the assumption of superiority is an undercu ...
    Related: elite, political power, power elite, university press, frederick jackson turner
  • Human Values And Ethics Vs Philisophical Ethics - 1,353 words
    ... nature and it's laws. He was arguing that everything in nature operates in conformity with certain rules and standards. More specifically, Kantian personal moral law -- "categorical imperative" says the following: "Act as if the maxim [that is the subjective governing principle] of your action were to become through your will a universal law of nature" (p. 31 Grounding for the Metaphysics of Morals). Now, could you imagine what it would be like, if abortion had became 'a universal law of nature?' The existence of human species would come to an end. Therefore, I think that deontologists, based on the facts I've just given, would consider abortion in general as an immoral thing to do. Neve ...
    Related: ethics, human values, catholic church, roman catholic, fetus
  • Hunger And Poverty - 790 words
    Hunger And Poverty During the course of this particular essay, I will prove to you many points. Maybe not to the extreme that it will change ones thought processes on the subject of hunger and world poverty, but enough to form a distinction between moral obligation and moral capacity. What I will not mention is the fact that Peter Singers outdated material (1971), though thorough in the sense of supporting his view on hunger and world poverty as well as examining this school of thought, is unconvincing to say the least. As our recent past has shown us, using Somalia and Rwanda as models, no amount of money or time on earth can come between a civil war. Terrible things happen, innocent people ...
    Related: hunger, poverty, world poverty, thomas aquinas, human race
  • Image And Reality - 1,478 words
    ... civil rights movement in order to gain black votes (335). Jack did not care about black issues, as he made it seem. The only time he even talked about blacks was about getting black votes (336). Kennedy made it appear as though he was in favor of civil rights, and said that he would use his presidential powers, once elected, to end segregation. His sympathy toward Martin Luther King made black civil rights leaders believe he was the epitome of equality. But once in office he neglected his promises because he did not want to make southern Democrats angry. Their support was needed in Congress to pass legislation (335-36). On top of all of that Jack appointed forty blacks for important gov ...
    Related: free world, free press, black civil rights, adultery, cultivated
  • In What Ways Is Identity A Social Construct - 1,642 words
    In What Ways Is Identity A Social Construct? "Without social identity, there is, in fact, no society." -- Richard Jenkins The idea that beliefs about "who we are" are created in a social context reflects the basic sociological theory that human beings are socially created, not prisoners of instinct. Sociologists see identity as related to the society in which people exist. People, are, in part, socialized into their identities. There are assorted ways that conceptions about individual and group identities are socially constructed. An identity is created against a social background that tries to make social interaction meaningful, understandable and well-organized by categorizing people in va ...
    Related: construct, ethnic identity, gender identity, sexual identity, social class, social construction, social factors
  • Jane Austen - 1,295 words
    Jane Austen EL2 - Essay 2 Angela Bathgate Tutor - Julie Marney 6. How does Mansfield Park interrogate the relationship of power and gender? Mansfield Park by Jane Austen is a classic realist text, which is almost exclusively focused on a small strip of society, namely the upper-middle class of rural England; the class to which she herself belonged. Throughout her novel, Austen portrays the disadvantaged position of woman, presenting the issues of gender stereotyping and marriage choice as the main problems they have to confront. "Gender came to be seen as a construct of society, designed to facilitate the smooth-running of society to the advantage of men"1, proving that men gained power thro ...
    Related: austen, jane, jane austen, personal identity, society and culture
  • Nationalism - 844 words
    Nationalism During the 100-year period of 1814 to 1914 every social group throughout Europe embraced the ideology of nationalism. Its success was largely due to the fact that it offered something for everyone regardless of social or political status. It had no specific ideas for government or economy, just simply whatever is best for the nation. Nationalism also combined well with all other ideologies of the time. However, the different classes of European society accepted nationalism for different reasons and at different times. In the years 1814 through 1848 nationalism ascended onto European society through the middle class. Shortly after the French Revolution in 1814 the Congress of Vien ...
    Related: nationalism, john f kennedy, middle class, social security, unification
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