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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: social reform

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  • Societys Restraint To Social Reform - 1,785 words
    Societys Restraint to Social Reform Of the many chatted words in the social reform vocabulary of Canadians today, the term workfare seems to stimulate much debate and emotion. Along with the notions of self-sufficiency, employability enhancement, and work disincentives, it is the concept of workfare that causes the most tension between it's government and business supporters and it's anti-poverty and social justice critics. In actuality, workfare is a contraction of the concept of "working for welfare" which basically refers to the requirement that recipients perform unpaid work as a condition of receiving social assistance. Recent debates on the subject of welfare are far from unique. They ...
    Related: reform, restraint, social assistance, social contract, social justice, social policy, social reform
  • The Military: An Impetus For Social Reform - 991 words
    The Military: An Impetus For Social Reform The Military: An Impetus for Social Reform Revolutionary War The military since the Colonial Era has been an impetus for social reform in the United States. The Revolutionary War afforded Black Americans an opportunity to escape from the toils of slavery and fight for freedom. Some Black Americans even earned their freedom by fighting for the Colonists, but still the freedom they fought for wasn't their own. However, the military was responsible for the freedom of many slaves and some of these freed slaves became legendary soldiers like Salem Poor. His performance in battle gave credibility for future arguments about blacks being allowed to serve. I ...
    Related: impetus, reform, social pressure, social reform, state university
  • A Reaction To Uncle Toms Cabin - 1,339 words
    A Reaction To Uncle Tom's Cabin Lauren Richmond History 201 April 1, 1999 A Reaction to Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin "So this is the little lady who made this big war." Abraham Lincoln's legendary comment upon meeting Harriet Beecher Stowe demonstrates the significant place her novel, Uncle Tom's Cabin, holds in American history. Published in book form in 1852, the novel quickly became a national bestseller and stirred up strong emotions in both the North and South. The context in which Uncle Tom's Cabin was written, therefore, is just as significant as the actual content. Among other things, Stowe's publication of her novel was stimulated by the increasing tensions among the na ...
    Related: cabin, toms, toms cabin, uncle, uncle tom's cabin, uncle toms cabin
  • Approaches To Environmental Ethics And Kants Principle - 1,026 words
    ... sent state of world hunger. First, the Commission claims there is a "moral obligation to overcome hunger, based on two universal values - respect for human dignity and social justice." (396) In the hierarchy of human needs, food is one of the most basic of all, along with air, water and shelter. If these fundamental requirements for life are not met, then higher level needs seem almost to be luxuries and unimportant. Unless all governments of the world actively strive to see that hunger is a tragedy of the past, "the principle that human life is sacred, which forms the very basis of human society, will gradually but relentlessly erode." (397) The Commission believes the US would be the s ...
    Related: approaches, environmental, environmental ethics, ethics, moral obligation
  • Birth Of A Nation: The Suppression Of A People - 1,772 words
    Birth of a Nation: The Suppression of a People Birth of a Nation: The Suppression of a People America is believed to be founded as the first state founded on the notion that democracy is for all people, however this is far from the truth. Not only did it take almost two hundred years till the American government grants full opportunities to African American, they even accepted the slavery of these peoples for almost half of that time. A republic government, such as the American government, is based on the idea that all people can have an equal represented fairly and have an equal vote. This is very hard to accomplish when groups of people living within that republic are discriminated against ...
    Related: american people, colored people, suppression, point of view, new brunswick
  • Brazilian Economy - 1,016 words
    ... mption, although this will lag behind the other drivers of growth. Industrial production grew in February for the fifth time in seven months, the first time Brazil has posted such a broad expansion since late 1997 (LaitnFocus) Public debt growth accelerated after mid-1995 due to the need to stabilize short-term capital inflows drawn by high domestic interest rates. This policy together with the need to extend central bank credit to the financial sector to help troubled banks has also led to a growing quasi-fiscal deficit. The Real's value has held well below its weakest point early in 1999 (around R2: $1), ending 1999 at R1.79: $1. Although debt repayments are forecast to be higher in th ...
    Related: brazilian, brazilian economy, economy, open economy, world economy
  • Buddhism In America - 1,475 words
    Buddhism In America The stresses and intensity of modern American society have influenced many people to adopt and adapt the principles of Buddhism and other Eastern religions. Some recent statistics from the US department of Health and Human Services show that 75% of the General Population experiences at least "some stress" every two weeks (National Health Interview Survey). Half of those experience moderate or high levels of stress during the same two-week period. It is common knowledge that stress can lead to heart disease, high blood pressure, strokes, and other illnesses in many individuals. Stress also contributes to the development of alcoholism, obesity, suicide, drug addiction, ciga ...
    Related: america, buddhism, jack kerouac, human evolution, freely
  • Can Sociology Be Value Free - 1,286 words
    Can Sociology Be Value Free? Value neutrality is a term used by Weber to indicate the necessary objectivity researchers need when investigating problems in the social sciences. Weber also cautioned against the making of value judgements which coincide with the orientation or motives of the researcher. It is important to note that although Weber believed that value neutrality was the aim of research, his view was that no science is fundamentally neutral and its observational language is never independent of the way individuals see phenomena and the questions they ask about them (Morrison 1995 pp.267, 347) It is this link between the researcher's theoretical stand and the methods adopted that ...
    Related: sociology, twentieth century, research process, scientific method, dissimilar
  • Catherine The Great - 1,166 words
    ... inst Turkey. Nevertheless, the drafts written by the electives were not wasted, as the materials were employed in a "Description of the Russian Empire and its International Administration and Legal Enactments," published in 1783. This proclamation was the closest thing that Russia had to a law code for the next 50 years (Hosking 100). It denounced capital punishment and torture, it argued for crime prevention and, in general, "was abreast of advanced Western thought for criminology" (Riasanovsky 259). Catherine decided that, before positing common interests, which did not exist, she should put more backbone into fragmented Russia by creating institutions which would enable citizens to wo ...
    Related: catherine, catherine the great, russian empire, everyday life, contribution
  • Change Of Chinese Theory - 811 words
    Change Of Chinese Theory Western film theory is generally subdivided into classical theory and contemporary theory. Contemporary theory consists of a theoretical system, which employs psychoanalysis, ideological critique and feminism to interpret cinematic forms. It originated in the mid-sixties and flourished in the 1970s. It was first introduced to China in the early 1980s and brought in as a complete theoretical system a few years later. Peaking in the late 1980s, it should have taken up an important position in the development of China's film theory. Classical film theory had developed very slowly in China, and by the end of the 1970s it had acquired the following features: It was a theo ...
    Related: chinese, chinese people, classical theory, traditional chinese, foreign countries
  • Charles Dickens - 1,908 words
    Charles Dickens Charles Dickens Charles John Huffam Dickens is the greatest English writer that ever lived. He was one of the most popular writers in the history of literature. Surely no English author is so well known and so widely read, translated and remembered as Charles Dickens. He fame is well deserved. From the pen of this great author came such characters as Oliver Twist, David Copperfield, Bob Cratchit and Tiny Tim, Mr. Pickwick, and Little Nett. Dickens was born on February 7, 1812, in Portsmouth and spent most of his childhood in London and Kent, both of which appear frequently in his novels. Charles Dickens was the son of John and Elizabeth Dickens. John Dickens worked as a clerk ...
    Related: charles dickens, walt disney, daily news, working class, amendment
  • Chinese Society - 1,573 words
    Chinese Society China Paper CHINESE SOCIETY Even since the dramatic post-1949 changes in China regarding the role of women, China has remained paternalistic in it's attitudes and social reality. The land reform, which was intended to create a more balanced economic force in marriage, was the beginning of governmental efforts to pacify women, with no real social effect. Communist China needed to address the woman question. Since women wanted more equality, and equality is doled out from the hands of those in power,capitalism was examined. The economic issues of repressed Chinese women were focused on the Land Act and the Marriage Act of 1950. The Land reform succeeded in eliminating the exten ...
    Related: chinese, chinese society, chinese women, family member, birth control
  • Countercultures Of The 60s - 627 words
    Countercultures Of The 60'S In the turmoil of the 60s, America was at war with Vietnam. But more evident was the movement among the young people taking part in the protests and displays. Many people were against this was, especially the youth, an unfair was the was seeing many of our youth being killed and drafted in America. The mass exhibitions world wide against the Vietnam war saw millions of young people become united. Counterculture: Groups or movements existing within an modern society and in any country which find themselves in opposition to governing and accepted mainstream ideas, values and the approved and sanctioned forms of self expression. They were against mainstream political ...
    Related: american music, baby boomers, world wide, nuclear, african
  • Eleanor Roosevelt - 1,411 words
    Eleanor Roosevelt The Contributions of Eleanor Roosevelt Anna Eleanor Roosevelt was born in New York City on October 11, 1884. She was one of America's great reforming leaders who had a sustained impact on national policy toward youth, blacks, women, the poor, and the United Nations. As the wife of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, she was one of the most active First Ladies as well as an important public personality in her own right. When Eleanor Roosevelt traveled to New York City a week after her husband's funeral in April 1945, a host of reporters were waiting at the door of her Washington Square apartment. The story is over, she said simply, assuming that her words and opinions would no ...
    Related: anna eleanor roosevelt, eleanor, eleanor roosevelt, franklin d roosevelt, franklin roosevelt, roosevelt
  • Fight For The Female - 1,770 words
    Fight for the Female Margaret Atwood, a contemporary Canadian author, has been classified as one of this centurys' most feminist, and near dystopian novelists. Her works illustrate how feminism has caused the downfall of contemporary society. Margaret Atwood, a prominent feminist author of the twentieth century, is driven by her sense of social reform and her realistic view of a disturbed society to produce works such as The Handmaids Tale. Atwood was born on November 18, 1943 in Ottawa, Ontario. In her earlier years as a child, she lived in the Canadian wilderness where her father was an entomologist. He studied and observed insects. Atwood is the second of three children of Margaret Doroth ...
    Related: social groups, human condition, science fiction, location, equality
  • Florence Kelley - 1,153 words
    Florence Kelley Introduction Florence Kelley was born in Philadelphia in 1859 into a cultured and affluent family. Her family was actively devoted to social reform. Her father, Congressman William (Pig Iron) Kelley, fought passionately to persuade government to uphold the rights of the poor and weak. He strongly believed that every child in America, whether born rich or poor should be afforded the same opportunities and chances in life. Florence was conditioned from a very early age to despise the sight of little children hard at work. Her father was a dominating influence throughout Florence's life. He taught her to read at the age of seven. He provided books that focused on child labor and ...
    Related: florence, kelley, state legislature, labor practices, campaign
  • Fredrick Douglass - 1,896 words
    Fredrick Douglass Justin Frieberg Dr. Ursule Yates Eng. 121, Sec. 41 4/28/2000 Fredrick Douglass and Education Frederick Douglass was, and still is, a golden example of why education is so important to a human being's life. Douglass spent the first part of his life in ignorance. However, his life of a seemingly endless servitude and ignorance was completely shattered by the fact that he learned to read. Once he learned to read, his life was forever changed. Douglass escaped slavery and tyranny and for this became an icon even to this day. His story more than adequately demonstrates that a quality education is perhaps the most important thing a person can receive in their life. Without his ed ...
    Related: frederick douglass, fredrick, fredrick douglass, fort worth, public education
  • From Heaven To Hell - 2,058 words
    From Heaven to Hell In the United States we often look to European and African countries for examples of dictatorship, civil war, inequality and genocide. In the 1990s, several countries experienced mass exodus, civil war, race war, religious war, and genocide. Yugoslavias Serbian population attempted to cleanse itself of Muslims and Croats, in Rwanda the Hutu population exterminated almost the entire Tutsi population, while in East Timor and several other countries refugees fled from the tyranny of "their" government. Less often however do we look, or even realize that our neighbors to the south are experiencing remarkably similar acts of violence, hate, and misuse of power. Bordered mostly ...
    Related: working class, collective bargaining, health care, tutsi, surround
  • Gandhi - 1,556 words
    ... inciple of love in all areas of life. For Gandhi, the state represented violence in a concentrated form. It spoke in the language of compulsion and uniformity, sapped its subjects' spirit of initiative and self-help, and unmanned them. Since human beings were not fully developed and capable of acting in a socially responsible manner, the state was necessary. However, if it was not to hinder their growth, it had to be organised so that it used as little coercion as possible and left as large an area of human life as possible to voluntary efforts. As Gandhi imagined it, a truly non-violent society was federally constituted and composed of small, self-governing, and relatively self-sufficie ...
    Related: gandhi, social issues, jawaharlal nehru, political movement, prayer
  • Gentic Engineering - 2,250 words
    ... ilities; the difficulties lie not in the means of production, but in the relations of production, the social and political context in which the technology is deployed. A second, and far less Marxian observation, is that social domination has some biological determinants. Patriarchy is, in part, based on women's physical vulnerability, and their special role in reproduction. While industrialization, contraception and the liberal democratic state may have removed the bulk of patriarchy's weight, genetic technology offers to remove the rest. Similarly, while racism, ageism, heterosexism, and so on may be only 10% biological and 90% social construction, at least the biological factors can be ...
    Related: engineering, genetic engineering, animal research, medical research, tier
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