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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: social psychology

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  • Analysis Of The Underlying Social Psychology - 1,123 words
    Analysis of the underlying social psychology of the Holocaust March 9, 2000 The hate and prejudice that began the Holocaust went hand in hand with a political agenda that was fueled by the frustration aggression theory.(1) Hitler blamed the Jews for the loss of World War I and thus, instead of targeting political aspects of the Jewish community, he displaced his aggression towards ALL Jews, even the helpless. This, combined with religious anti-Semitism prejudice that had been present in Germany for 1500 years and the theory of eugenics, was the political and instrumental center of Hitler's political campaign.(5) He used a system of 'elimination of freedom', which he felt was necessary in the ...
    Related: psychology, social psychology, underlying, cognitive dissonance, jewish community
  • Analysis Of The Underlying Social Psychology - 1,161 words
    ... ople rescued others for various reasons. Some were motivated by a sense of morality. Others had a relationship with a particular person or group and thus, felt a sense of obligation. Some were politically driven and were adamantly opposed to Hitler. Other rescuers were involved at work as diplomats, nurses, social workers, and doctors, and thus were conditioned to continue their involvement beyond their professional obligation. This is where cognitive dissonance comes into effect in this instance. These people were raised to help, it was a part of their moral fabric. To go against that learned belief would cause dissonance, therefore, these people had it woven into them to rescue, to hel ...
    Related: psychology, social animal, social psychology, social workers, underlying
  • Social Psychology: Interpersonal And Group Perspectives - 705 words
    Social Psychology: Interpersonal And Group Perspectives Social Psychology: Interpersonal and Group Perspectives In our textbook, prejudice is defined as: a form of thinking whereby an individual forms an unfavorable attitude directed towards groups of people, based on insufficient or incorrect evidence about these groups. Prejudice has been a part of society for as long as society has been. There are many different theories on the reasons for why people form prejudices. The theory of social categorization states that it is human nature to put people into categories based on certain characteristics. Which is also how we form stereotypes. Stereotypes give us a preconceived notion of how people ...
    Related: interpersonal, social identity, social psychology, self esteem, identity theory
  • The Effects Of Color On Personality And Relationships - 1,051 words
    ... nditioned to gold over a period of time. Gold strengthens all fields of the body and spirit. Black: is a color that is not used very often but it will help bring a patient to a state of grace. It will help them reach the silence and the peace of God. For example, women are more aware of color and prefer red to blue while men prefer blue to red. Elderly people have a significant preference for light colors over darker ones. People with schizophrenia tend to prefer neutral colors such as white, black, brown, and gray. People with bipolar disorder and mentally healthy individuals tend to prefer chromatic hues such as red, yellow, green and blue. Red and yellow aren't the only warm colors; n ...
    Related: human personality, personality, relationships, medical profession, bipolar disorder
  • A Major Role In The Continuation Of Modern Society Is Our Leaders And The Roles They Play They Are The Ones Who Will Show Us - 1,418 words
    A major role in the continuation of modern society is our leaders and the roles they play. They are the ones who will show us the way, so to speak. But who will these people, these leaders, be? What qualities and characteristics do leaders possess? And why is it we the people follow these leaders? But first, what is leadership? Leadership is a process whereby one group member influences and coordinates the behavior of other members in pursuit of the groups goals. This specific group member, the leader, provides guidance, specialized skills, and environmental contacts that help obtain the goals of the group. Some activities, or responsibilities, of the leader are planning, organizing, and con ...
    Related: good leader, leadership role, modern society, prentice hall, new jersey
  • Aggression - 2,625 words
    Aggression Aggression 1 Running Head: AGGRESSION Aggression: Dealing with the Aspects that we are faced with Day in and Day Out Aggression 2 Abstract We live in a society where aggressive acts happen every day, but do we really know what causes it? How can we help ourselves and others to understand what aggression is? First off, we need to define aggression, tell it's causes and effects and determine the best way to deal with it. For example, aggression can be positive or negative, accidental or intended and physical or mental. Aggression is a continuing behavior in our world today and I feel that it is very important that we try to start controlling it now. Aggression 3 Aggression is a crit ...
    Related: aggression, human aggression, social environment, social psychology, expresses
  • Aggression - 2,627 words
    ... Running Head: AGGRESSION Aggression: Dealing with the Aspects that we are faced with Day in and Day Out Natalie Grow York College Aggression 2 Abstract We live in a society where aggressive acts happen every day, but do we really know what causes it? How can we help ourselves and others to understand what aggression is? First off, we need to define aggression, tell it's causes and effects and determine the best way to deal with it. For example, aggression can be positive or negative, accidental or intended and physical or mental. Aggression is a continuing behavior in our world today and I feel that it is very important that we try to start controlling it now. Aggression 3 Aggression is ...
    Related: aggression, human aggression, social psychology, over time, negatively
  • Aggressive Behavior - 1,312 words
    Aggressive Behavior Aggression is a behavioral characteristic that refers to forceful actions or procedures (such a deliberate attack) with intentions to dominate or master. It tends to be hostile, injurious, or destructive, and is often motivated by frustration (The Merriam-Webster Dictionary, 1995). For an individual, aggressive behavior is considered understandable and normal under appropriate circumstances, but when it is frequent, intense, lasting, and pervasive, it is more likely to be a symptom of a mental disorder. Likewise, aggression between groups, can be in the form of healthy competition, but can become harmful when unfair or unjust disadvantage or frustration is perceived, lead ...
    Related: abnormal behavior, aggressive, aggressive behavior, behavioral therapy, social norms
  • Aids Related Stigma Since The Appearance Of Aids In The Late Seventies And Early Eighties, The Disease Has Had Attached To It - 1,516 words
    ... lthough some things have changed and laws have been passed, the effects if stigma are still prevalent. Many people still express feelings of fear and hostility towards PLWAs (OHare, et al., 1996). Most of the negative attitudes felt and expressed are irrational but the effects can be devastating. One effect is peoples tendency to avoid all contact with PLWAs which contributes to social isolation. Also, even though legislation has been passed, discrimination still does exist. When asked about the treatment he received at Montreal General Hospital, an HIV positive patient explained that AIDS discrimination is far from being eradicated and that PLWAs are treated in a very negative fashion i ...
    Related: aids, seventies, stigma, issues surrounding, care system
  • Albert Bandura - 1,021 words
    ... reproduce it with your own behavior. 3. Reproduction. You have to translate the images or descriptions into actual behavior. Our ability to imitate improves with practice at the behaviors involved. In addition, our abilities improve even when we just imagine ourselves performing the behavior. 4. Motivation. Yet with all this, youre still not going to do anything unless you are motivated to imitate or until you have some reason for doing it. Bandura mentions a number of motives: past reinforcement (traditional behaviorism), promised reiforcement (incentives we can imagine), and vicarious reinforcement (seeing and recalling the model being reinforced). In addition there are negative motiv ...
    Related: albert, albert bandura, bandura, american psychological, social psychology
  • Class, State, And Crime: Social Conflict Perspective - 1,129 words
    Class, State, And Crime: Social Conflict Perspective Michael Merchant Class: Social Psychology Class, State, and Crime : Social Conflict Perspective How does Class, state ,and social controls within a capitalistic society lead to increase crime due to the criminal laws and criminal justice system imposed on the lower middle class. Social conflict theory is the only one out of the vast number of criminology theories that deals directly with this problem. From out of it's Marxist roots arose a theory which challenges the way in which today's society views it's legal system and the implications it has on it's working class citizens. The nature and purpose of social conflict theories is to exami ...
    Related: conflict perspective, conflict theory, social change, social class, social conditions, social conflict, social control
  • Conformity - 1,368 words
    Conformity Use some psychological studies of conformity to discuss reasons for conforming. According to Leon Mann, conformity means yielding to group pressures. Everyone is a member of one group or another and everyone expects members of these groups to behave in certain ways. If you are a member of an identifiable group you are expected to behave appropriately to it. If you dont confirm and behave appropriately you are likely to be rejected by the group. Like stereotypes, conforming and expecting others to conform maintains cognitive balance. There are several kinds of conformity. Many studies of conformity took place in the 1950s which led Kelman to distinguish between compliance, internal ...
    Related: conformity, social psychology, common sense, psychological research, kinetic
  • Crossing Gender Lines - 1,264 words
    Crossing Gender Lines Corrie Molenaar 11.16.01 Engl. 1210 Sec. 001 Joy Ellen Parker Essay #2 Crossing Gender Lines Author and feminist Alix Kates Shulman said once: "Sexism goes so deep that at first it's hard to see, you think it's just reality" (McEneany). That quote sums up perfectly the way our society runs. There is no class teaching children how to act according the their gender. Yet little boys and little girls learn at a very young age what is expected of them. They get ideas about their gender roles from their parents, their school teachers and subconsciously from the toys they play with and the television shows they watch. Even before the children are born, parents begin choosing c ...
    Related: crossing, gender, gender gap, gender identity, gender roles, gender stereotypes
  • Development Of Psychology - 964 words
    Development Of Psychology John Wilson Psychology Essay (Development of psychology) In the following essay I will explain the development of major schools in terms of distinguishing features and historical context. Scientific study is a valid way of coming to an understanding of life, and can be very useful in every area of life. Science develops theories based on what is observed. It examines each theory with rigorous and scrupulous tests to see if it describes reality. The scientific method works well in observing and recording physical data and in reaching conclusions which either confirm or nullify a theory. During the mid-19th century, scholars (although at that time probably termed phil ...
    Related: cognitive psychology, human psychology, psychology, social psychology, psychological aspects
  • Erich Fromm - 672 words
    Erich Fromm . Erich Fromm who is a liberal social psychodynamic psychologist who was also a student of Freuds'. He believes that man is innately good and society is the thing that corrupts him. He also feels that the conscious mind dominates over the unconscious. Fromm says man is a social creature and he believes that mankind has social needs. He says life is a struggle and society makes our lives difficult. Fromm feels that the four needs of mans' social life are relatedness, frame of reference, identity, and transcendence. Relatedness is a basic need and it states that man needs to feel connected to humanity whether it be friends, family, or activities. It also states that man has to be i ...
    Related: erich, erich fromm, fromm, belief system, social life
  • Forensic Psychology - 528 words
    Forensic Psychology Part I: The Job Forensic Psychology is the application of the science and profession of psychology to questions and issues relating to law and the legal system. The word forensic comes from the Latin word forensis, meaning of the forum, where the law courts of ancient Rome were held. Today forensic refers to the application of scientific principles and practices to the adversary process where specially knowledgeable scientists play a role. There are several types of Forensic Psychologists although most fall into three different categories, criminal investigation, courtroom experts, and/or correctional psychiatrists. I decided to focus on the criminal aspect since it inter ...
    Related: abnormal psychology, child psychology, developmental psychology, forensic, psychology, social psychology
  • How Do Psychologists Attempt To Explain The Origins Of Prejudice - 1,390 words
    How Do Psychologists Attempt To Explain The Origins Of Prejudice? HOW DO PSYCHOLOGISTS ATTEMPT TO EXPLAIN THE ORIGINS OF PREJUDICE? DO THEY OFFER SOCIETY ANY HOPE THAT IT MAY BE REDUCED? BY JON SALECLEMENTS. Ethnocentrism is the tendency to assume that one's culture or way of life is superior to all others. Prejudice is a negative attitude toward an entire category of individuals. Discrimination is behaviour that excludes all members of a group from certain rights, opportunities or privileges. A range of international events have recently focused attention on the issue of prejudice; increasing ethno-nationalistic tensions in former Eastern block countries, racial conflict in the Middle East, ...
    Related: prejudice, psychologists, psychodynamic approach, individual differences, reduction
  • Infantile Amenisia - 747 words
    Infantile Amenisia Our brains are constantly at work processing and retrieving information. However, we become frustrated when we cannot readily retrieve information that we have stored in our brains. The inability to remember can occur for a number of reasons that range from simple forgetting to phenomena like Infantile Amnesia. Infantile Amnesia is described as an adults inability to remember events before the age of two or three. This phenomena has proven difficult to test because your memory is in a constant state of reconstruction, (Rupp, 1998, p. 171). That is your memories are influenced by past events, and current perceptions about yourself. Therefore, you may remember events only in ...
    Related: rivers press, long term memory, grown children, hill, recall
  • Juvenile Delinquency And Society - 1,968 words
    Juvenile Delinquency And Society Juvenile Delinquency and Society Throughout time, crime has played in an important part in the function of society. We see crime in the news everyday, in our communities, in our schools, and in some cases, even in our immediate families. Which reaches out and takes a stranglehold on the human-interest angle of the general public's mind, and makes us become enveloped in the thought processes of the modern criminal. Along these lines, the fascination with delinquent behavior and the mind of the delinquent has prompted the development of numerous theories, and the continuous, yet rigorous, study of youth behavior. But only recently has the concept of juvenile de ...
    Related: delinquency, juvenile, juvenile court, juvenile delinquency, juvenile delinquents, juvenile justice
  • Leadership Theories - 1,289 words
    Leadership Theories This essay will approach types of power such as; to utilize and influence others, to either reward or punish, to confirm by role of an organization, and to identify with a leader such as rock or film personality. This essay will cover six categories of power and these interlink with each other and brings a better focus on theories of power. The functions of leadership are many and varied, depending upon the basic problem with a group must deal with, and the type of leadership style in action, which is dependent on the leaders basis of power. Power, in the case of leadership, is divided into six categories, however, each can be linked with another, as they are inter-relate ...
    Related: leadership, leadership style, formal education, different approaches, depending
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