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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: social problems

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  • How Overpopulation Causes Social Problems - 1,470 words
    How Overpopulation Causes Social Problems How Overpopulation Causes Social Problems Introduction The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how overpopulation causes social problems. To do so you must take many things into consideration, such as different views of racial problems and conflicting definitions of a social problem. Social problems can be defined in many different ways. They effect everyone and some of us encounter problems everyday as a result of our race, religion, gender, or low income. Others experience problems from technological change or declining neighborhoods, others are affected directly by crime and violence in their own neighborhood, and sometimes definitions of soci ...
    Related: overpopulation, social groups, social order, social problems, social structures
  • How Overpopulation Causes Social Problems - 1,496 words
    ... the father of the child will be there to love and support both of them. Statistics show that most of them leave the mother to support the child on their own with no financial support whatsoever. America's inner cities -Vs- Third World Countries At first, it might appear impossible to compare conditions in America's inner cities with those that characterize overpopulated countries of the Third World. In both instances such factors as poverty, overcrowding and lack of educational and employment opportunities promote negative social patterns. In both the United States and Third World countries poor young males in particular are frequently forced to choose between a life of crime and compet ...
    Related: overpopulation, social issues, social problems, foster child, family planning
  • Social Problems - 349 words
    Social Problems SOCIAL PROBLEMS JOURNAL Fall 1998 Professor Milton Social Problems Personal Essay 8/27/98 Over 21 years ago I was born in a little town in Iowa. Because of my dads work we moved to Illinois. It was there where I spent most of my childhood years, with my dad, mom, two brothers and two sisters. At age 15 after my freshman year in high school, we moved once again. It was a hard adjustment to make at first, but soon after we moved, school started and I was able to make many new friends. So, for the past 6 years our home has been in Arizona. After graduation from high school I started work as an intern in a human resources department of a large company here in Phoenix. Here I lear ...
    Related: social problems, social studies, american government, human resources, default
  • Social Problems With Ecstay - 1,321 words
    Social Problems With Ecstay Social Problems of Ecstasy and Raves Throughout American history drugs have posed a problem to society and lawmakers. Many attempts have transpired to try to prevent future problems associated with drugs. Many of the drugs threatening America were originally designed toward the improvement of human health. The most recent epidemic of recreational drug use is ecstasy. Ecstasys popularity is particularly in the possession of the nations youth. The institute of use is at all-night clubs and bars within many large cities. Recent research has been completed about the problems and long term effects of the drug. Does the new era of rave clubs and club drugs such as ecsta ...
    Related: drug problem, health problems, problems associated, social issues, social problems
  • Buckley Jr - 2,624 words
    ... alleviate the symptoms of glaucoma; to improve appetite dangerously reduced from AIDS. They use it as an effective medicine, yet they are technically regarded as criminals, and every year many are jailed. Although more than 75 per cent of Americans believe that marijuana should be available legally for medical purposes, the Federal Government refuses to legalize access or even to sponsor research. 2. Drugs are here to stay. The time has come to abandon the concept of a "drug-free society." We need to focus on learning to live with drugs in such a way that they do the least possible harm. So far as I can ascertain, the societies that have proved most successful in minimizing drug-related ...
    Related: buckley, war on drugs, johns hopkins, community policing, stick
  • 60s Music Influence On Our Society - 1,930 words
    60'S Music Influence On Our Society Sixties Music and How it Reflected the Changing Times Chris Montaigne Professor Shao Rhetoric II The 1960's in the United States was a decade marred by social unrest, civil rights injustice, and violence both home and abroad. These were some of the factors that lead to a cultural revolution. The revolution attempted to diverge the fabric of American society. Teenagers were living dangerously and breaking away from the ideals that their parents held. In the process they created their own society (Burns 1990). They were young and had the nerve to believe that they could change the world. Their leaders had lofty goals as well. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. had d ...
    Related: american society, folk music, music, popular music, rock music, woodstock music
  • The Psychological And Physical Aspects Of Drug Abuse In Today's Adolescence - 1,423 words
    "The Psychological And Physical Aspects Of Drug Abuse In Today'S Adolescence" "The psychological and physical aspects of drug abuse in today's adolescence" Unfortunately the abuse of illegal drugs is not uncommon in today's adolescent communities. Many teenagers today use illicit drugs as a way to deal with everyday pressures such as school, after school jobs, sports activities, domestic violence and peer pressure. Adolescence has been found to be a period of weakening bonds with parents and strengthening bonds with peers (Flay, 1994). Numerous states have experienced an increase in drug related deaths (http://www.usdoj.gov/dea/stats). More than 1 in 10 of today's youth aged 12-17 were curre ...
    Related: abuse, adolescence, drug abuse, drug addiction, drug problem, gateway drug, psychological
  • A Clockwork Orange - 255 words
    A Clockwork Orange Many of us like to think that humanity as a whole is progressing to a better future where we will live united and in peace with one another. Nevertheless, there are those among us that do not share these beliefs. In A Clockwork Orange, by Anthony Burgess, a futuristic world is turned upside down and in shambles. This 1962 classic is a frightful depiction of what our society could become and possibly, what it already is. Drugs almost seem to be legal and unregulated and subsequently are widely used. The prison system is overcrowded with young punk criminals who are inherently evil with no regard for humanity, or any part of society for that matter. Youth take over the stree ...
    Related: a clockwork orange, clockwork, clockwork orange, orange, anthony burgess
  • A View On Censorship And The Government - 1,356 words
    A View On Censorship And The Government Daniel Bagwell Ms. Waggoner English 111 15 November 2000 A View on Music and the Government The censorship of music and other forms of entertainment by the government have long been the topic of discussion among social and political circles. Some forms of censorship such as warning labels for parents can be helpful. However the censorship of music is just not right, and the government has no right to do so. All too often the government gets on a self righteous feeling and thinks that it is it's right to control what goes in or out of this so called "free nation's" minds. Censorship in music falls into one of those categories in which the American peopl ...
    Related: american government, censorship, jimi hendrix, social problems, songs
  • Abortion Prohibition - 1,317 words
    Abortion Prohibition One of the most ethical controversial issues been debated now in United States is whether late- term abortion should be banned or not. Most people argued that it is proper to ban late-term abortion. They believe that it is un-ethical and a murder of an unborn child not a right of freedom of choice. It is an immoral act and violates the social and religious norms. On the other hand some people argued that late-term abortion should not be banned because it is necessary to terminate a fetus when the life of the woman is in danger as a result of complicated pregnancy; or when pregnancy result from incest or rape and the woman may be late in finding out that she is pregnant. ...
    Related: abortion, prohibition, supreme court, civil liberty, catheter
  • Adlerian Psychotherapy: An Overview Of Theory And Practice - 1,190 words
    ... odify behavior. The goal of the therapy is to stimulate cognitive, affective and behavior change. Although the individual is not always fully aware of their specific goal, through analysis of birth order, repeated coping patterns and earliest memories, the psychotherapist infers the goal as a working hypothesis. The client approaches control of feelings and emotions. First, the client recognizes what kind of feeling he or she is having (angriness, sadness, frustration, etc). Once the client sees and knows the feeling; then he or she will try to imagine or think of something pleasant that had happened to him or her, replacing the bad feeling for a good one. By doing this, the client is in ...
    Related: overview, cognitive behavioral, behavior change, conflict resolution, adler
  • Alcohol Abuse - 1,350 words
    Alcohol Abuse Alcohol is liquid distilled product of fermented fruits, grains and vegetables used as solvent, antiseptic and sedative moderate potential for abuse. Possible effects are intoxication, sensory alteration, and/or anxiety reduction. Symptoms of overdose staggering, odor of alcohol on breath, loss of coordination, slurred speech, dilated pupils, fetal alcohol syndrome (in babies), and/or nerve and liver damage. Withdrawal Syndrome is first sweating, tremors, then altered perception, followed by psychosis, fear, and finally auditory hallucinations. Indications of possible mis-use are confusion, disorientation, loss of motor nerve control, convulsions, shock, shallow respiration, in ...
    Related: abuse, alcohol, alcohol abuse, alcohol consumption, alcohol dependence, alcohol syndrome, blood alcohol
  • Alcoholism - 1,537 words
    Alcoholism Alcoholism, Alcohol is liquid distilled product of fermented fruits, grains and vegetables used as solvent, antiseptic and sedative for potential abuse. Possible effects are intoxication, sensory alteration, and anxiety reduction. Symptoms of overdose staggering, odor of alcohol on breath, loss of coordination, slurred speech, dilated pupils, fetal alcohol syndrome in babies, and nerve and liver damage. Withdrawal Syndrome is first sweating, tremors then altered perception, followed by psychosis, fear, and finally auditory hallucinations. Indications of possible miss-use are confusion, disorientation, and loss of motor nerve control, convulsions, shock, shallow respiration, involu ...
    Related: alcoholism, school counselor, alcohol and drugs, physical system, solve
  • Alcoholism - 1,581 words
    Alcoholism Alcoholism is a disease of epidemic proportions, affecting 9.3 to 10 million Americans, and many professionals believe the figures are closer to 20 million (Weddle and Wishon). Alcoholism is a "physiological or physiological dependence on alcohol characterized by the alcoholics inability to control the start or termination of his drinking"(Encyclopedia Britannica 210). It consists of frequent and recurring consumption of alcohol to an extent that causes continued harm to the drinker and leads to medical and social problems. Alcoholism, however, does not merely cause harm to the alcoholic, but to the entire family as well, affecting an estimated 28 million children in this country ...
    Related: alcoholism, high school, human beings, social problems, fail
  • Alcoholismnature Or Nuture - 1,645 words
    Alcoholism-Nature Or Nuture? INTRODUCTION: Alcoholism can affect anyone. It has enormous costs as it pertains to societies, families, and individuals. It is not prejudicial towards any race, color, sex, religion, or economic level. Although we do have ideas as to what alcoholism is, what we do not know is the exact cause(s) of this problem. Researchers are continually seeking answers to the long-standing nature versus nurture debate. Different views are split between a biological paradigm and a physchological paradigm. No one explanation seems to be better than another is. I will present views of the effects alcoholism has on society and an insight to the factors that serve to fuel the natur ...
    Related: different views, social customs, urban areas, regulate, health
  • Amphetaminesmethamphetamines - 772 words
    Amphetamines/Methamphetamines Matchmaker.com: Sign up now for a free trial. Date Smarter! Amphetamines/Methamphetamines The medical use of amphetamines was common in the 1950/60's when they were used to help cure depression and to help the user lose weight. An amphetamine is a drug that is a stimulant to the central nervous system. Amphetamines are colorless and may be inhaled, injected, or swallowed. Amphetamines are also used non-medically to avoid sleep, improve athletic performance, or to counter the effects of depressant drugs. Amphetamines are addictive. Because of this, when the user discontinues use or reduces the amount that they use, withdrawal symptoms may occur. Some withdrawal s ...
    Related: long term effects, south korea, physical activity, addictive, smoke
  • Anarchism And Liberalism - 1,376 words
    Anarchism And Liberalism Contemporary liberal and anarchist philosophy are both two very different ways of trying to see what would be the best way to run society. While discussing these two ideologies I will try to show how both, in their purist sense, are not able work in today's society effectively. Contemporary liberals are involved in every day politics but through over regulation and dependence on government they loose their chances of running a reliable democracy. Anarchist have very good ideas of how a natural society could function without government or modern institutions but the biggest problem they have is how to get to that point. Both theories look good on paper but once they h ...
    Related: anarchism, contemporary liberalism, liberalism, social order, changing world
  • Anarchism And Liberalism - 1,399 words
    ... st groups to represent the labor force, minority groups, and any apathetic and helpless citizens. The presence of sub-government groups, such as big industry, are recognized as being insufficient in representing the public's interest and so the liberals call for more regulations to control these sub-governments from abusing their power. This goes right along with the whole philosophy of contemporary liberals in that they don't want to start over and rebuild the government, but rather reform it and ad more regulations to control it. The idea of a ruler goes against the basic stance of anarchism. Proudhon best describes this view when he said, "Whoever puts his hand on me to govern me is u ...
    Related: anarchism, contemporary liberalism, liberalism, free society, individual rights
  • Applied Nostalgia - 2,248 words
    Applied Nostalgia Applied Nostalgia--A Parental Look Back Without past memories, Americans lack a standard to base present conditions upon. These memories lie carefully shuffled and categorized in the giant shifter called the brain to crudely approximate the present standard of life. They hope to draw gratification and fulfillment in the progression of the quality of their and especially their children's lives. This innate desire to compare the past to the present drives personal and political decisions, especially conservatives who advocate a change to the policies and values of the past. Today, the faded memories of an emerging group of parents of their post-World War II upbringing, like c ...
    Related: last year, equal rights, world war ii, prepare, california
  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity - 1,205 words
    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder or Hyperactivity (ADHD), disorder beginning in childhood, characterized by a persistent inability to sit still, focus attention on specific tasks, and control impulses. Children with ADHD show these behaviors more frequently and severely than other children of the same age. A person with ADHD may have difficulty with school, work, friendships, or family life. ADHD has also been referred to as attention-deficit disorder, hyperkinesis, minimal brain dysfunction, and minimal brain damage. Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder is one of the most common mental disorders of childhood, affecting 3 to 5 percent of school-age ...
    Related: attention deficit, attention deficit disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, deficit, deficit disorder, deficit hyperactivity, hyperactivity
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