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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: sickle cell

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  • Sickle Cell Anemia - 849 words
    Sickle Cell Anemia The problem is that sickle cell anemia affects about 72,000 Americans in the United States. Sickle cell anemia is an inherited disease in which the body is unable to produce normal hemoglobin, an iron-containing protein. Abnormal hemoglobin can morph cells that can become lodged in narrow blood vessels, blocking oxygen from reaching organs and tissues. The effects of sickle cell anemia are bouts of extreme pain, infectious, fever, jaundice, stroke, slow growth, organ, and failure. Sickle cell anemia hurts many people today in fact it hurts about 72,000 Americans. But some doctors are finding cures for this inherited disease. This disease causes mainly strokes and fever. Wi ...
    Related: anemia, cell, cell anemia, cell disease, sickle, sickle cell, stem cell
  • Sickle Cell Disease - 546 words
    Sickle Cell Disease The genetic disorder I was told to research was the Sickle Cell Disease. I will explain what mutation causes this disease, the characteristics of it, and what has developed in the area of gene therapy because of it. The Sickle Cell Disease is an inherited disease. The gene for hemogoblin-S (which causes the disease) is the most common inherited blood condition in America; although most people only inherit one copy of the gene for HbS, while the other gene, hemogoblin-A, is normal, and can override HbS, blocking the disease. These people have the HbS trait, but not the disease, therefore leading a normal life. For an offspring to acquire the disease, both parents must have ...
    Related: cell, cell anemia, cell disease, disease causes, sickle, sickle cell
  • Sickle Cell Disease - 1,283 words
    Sickle Cell Disease The sickle cell disease is an inherited blood disorder that affects red blood cells. People with sickle cell have red blood cells that have mostly hemoglobin's, Sometimes these red blood cells become sickle-shaped or crescent shaped and have trouble going through small blood vessels. When sickle-shaped cells block small blood vessels, less blood can get to that part of the body. Tissue that does not get a normal blood flow eventually becomes damaged. This is what causes the problems of sickle cell disease. As to this day there is really no cure for sickle cell disease. Red blood cells take oxygen from the air we breathe into our lungs to all parts of the body. Oxygen is c ...
    Related: cell, cell anemia, cell disease, chronic disease, sickle, sickle cell
  • Anemia - 398 words
    Anemia What is Anemia? Anemia is a deficiency of red blood cells or hemoglobin in the blood. The word anemia comes from two Greek roots, together meaning without blood. At the beginning of the nineteenth century, anemia referred to the pallor of the skin and mucous membranes. After medical science advanced, blood cell counts could be done. Anemia became the disease we know today. Symptoms of Anemia Mild anemia may have no outer symptoms. Weakness, fatigue, and pallor are very common symptom. Symptoms of severe anemia are shortness of breath, rapid heartbeat, lightheadedness, headache, ringing in the ears, irritability, restless leg syndrome, mental confusion, dizziness, fainting, and dimmed ...
    Related: anemia, cell anemia, iron deficiency anemia, bone marrow, family history
  • Anthropolgy - 1,276 words
    Anthropolgy Anthropology- the study of humankind everywhere, through time, seeks to produce reliable knowledge about people and their behavior, both about what makes them different and what they have in common. What They Do- Physical anth- study humans as biological organisms, tracing there evolutionary development of the human animal and looking at biological variations within the species, past and present (human evol, Primates, Human diversity. Cultural Anth- is concerned with human cultures, or the ways of life in societies. Culture bound- Theories about the world and reality based on the assumptions and values of ones own culture. Within the field of cultural anth are Archaeologist- Is t ...
    Related: blue eyes, common culture, human diversity, assign, volcanic
  • Chapter 10 Definitions - 556 words
    Chapter 10 Definitions autosome: any chromosome other than the sex chromosome base deletion: a mutation in which a nucleotide is lost from the DNA sequence base insertion: a mutation in which a nucleotide base is added to the DNA sequence carrier: an individual who is heterozygous for a recessive trait chromosome mapping: a method of determining the relative position of genes on a chromosome using information on crossover frequency crossing over: exchange of parts between two homologous chromosomes deletion: a mutation in which a chromosomal piece breaks off and is lost frame-shift mutation: a mutation in which a base deletion or insertion cause the genes message to be translated incorrectly ...
    Related: turner syndrome, sickle cell, cell disease, error, syndrome
  • Cloning - 1,808 words
    Cloning Should we clone humans? Cloning humans has become a possibility that seems easier in today's society than it was twenty years ago. It is a method that involves the production of a group of identical cells or organisms that all derive from a single individual (Grolier 220). It is not known when or how cloning humans really became a possibility, but it is known that there are two possible ways that we can clone humans. The first way involves splitting an embryo into several halves and creating many new individuals from that embryo. The second method of cloning a human involves taking cells from an already existing human being and cloning them, in turn creating other individuals that ar ...
    Related: cloning, human cloning, sickle cell, human development, freezer
  • Cloning In Brave New World - 1,623 words
    Cloning In Brave New World Cloning in Brave New World by Christopher M. Earhart It has been said that Muhammad is the Seal of the Prophets, meaning that he was the last. However, our world has recently been graced by another prophet in Aldous Huxley. Huxley's prophetic vision is unmistakable in his science-fiction novel, Brave New World, in which he delivers a valuable message: control advancements in technology before they control us. Huxley supports this message with a strong example of a society that is so overrun by technology that the human race has lost their individuality, freedom, and ultimately their identity as human beings. In this Brave New World, artificially-born humans are gen ...
    Related: brave, brave new world, cloning, aldous huxley, future role
  • Dna Profiling - 1,264 words
    DNA Profiling Genetic engineering has developed and blossomed at a frightening rate in the last decade. Originating as merely an area of interest for scientists, genetic engineering has now become an area of which all people should be somewhat knowledgeable. DNA profiling has many uses, both positive and negative, in our society. Aside from its usefulness in many legal investigations, DNA profiling can be used in the workplace to discriminate against employees whose profiles could pose a financial risk. For example, genetic technology can and has been used to determine the capacity of a person to contract certain diseases, such as sickle-cell anemia, which could cause many employers to hesit ...
    Related: dna profiling, profiling, criminal investigations, federal government, jury
  • Gene Therapy - 637 words
    Gene Therapy Many diseases seen today are the result of a defective gene in the DNA of the patient and can not be cured using the traditional methods such as antibiotics and antiviral medication. The victims are now looking to gene therapy as a potential cure for their problems. Bob Williamson introduces us the concept, procedures, and problems associated with gene therapy in his article, "Gene Therapy". Along with the appearance of the recombinant DNA technology, it becomes possible for human beings to isolate, study, and change gene in the laboratory. Gene Therapy is the process of replacing a defective gene inside a patients DNA with a working gene that will produce the correct gene produ ...
    Related: gene, gene therapy, therapy, sickle cell, immune system
  • Genetic Engineering - 840 words
    Genetic Engineering Genetic Engineering Within the last two decades scientists have developed several new techniques, which manipulate and alter the genes found in the cells of living organisms. This wonder of the century, genetic engineering has turned heredity - the passing of inheritable characteristics from parent to off spring- from a natural, random event into a process that can be artificially controlled and exploited. It has the potential of giving humanity unprecedented power over life itself, and it has thus raised profound questions in such diverse areas as the environment, agriculture, biological warfare, and animal rights. Genetic engineering has clearly become the controversial ...
    Related: engineering, genetic, genetic code, genetic engineering, human beings
  • Genetic Engineering - 1,874 words
    Genetic Engineering Genetic Engineering Future Harmony or Future Harm The world of science has experienced many profound breakthroughs and advances in the twentieth century, but none perhaps as great as that of genetic engineering. However, the twentieth century society is not prepared or even willing at times to accept the moral and ethical controversies genetic engineering is creating. Genetic engineering, defined as the use or manipulation of an individuals genetic material in order to produce desired characteristics or results in the same individual, other individuals of the same species, or other species, is undoubtedly changing societys relationship with nature, medicine, and perhaps i ...
    Related: engineering, genetic, genetic disease, genetic diversity, genetic engineering, genetic testing
  • Germ Line Gene Therapy - 1,549 words
    Germ Line Gene Therapy Whether it is referred to by its scientific term syngamy or by the general term conception, the moment a sperm cell unites with an egg cell stirs, both in the scientist and the layperson, much awe and reverence. It is the point at which a new and unique genome is created. To some it is the instant a new person comes into existence. Such a union has been repeated for billions of years since its advent in the first, simple organisms. It is a means by which evolution can exert its influence. When the genetic material of two individuals combine in sexual reproduction, any variations between the two inherited sets of genes may result in offspring that are more or less suite ...
    Related: gene, gene therapy, germ, therapy, society today
  • Huey P Newton And The Black Panther Party - 1,428 words
    ... hers engaged young people who had given up society that they could make a difference and stop the daily brutality of police, which haunted many cities ( Acoli 1) . Hugh Pearson argues that the Panthers 'in your face' action has shaped the way police officers act in neighborhoods today. The party's message spread across the country like wildfire, engaging young Blacks in Northern Black communities. Branches of the Party in New York, Chicago and Oakland worked with gangs, trying to turn them away from violence and into community organizing ( Acoli 2). Vincent Harding historian of the civil rights movement said: The Panthers offered the young urban black male a purpose in their life. They w ...
    Related: black community, black history, black liberation, black nationalist, black panther, black panther party, black people
  • Human Disease Research - 2,297 words
    Human Disease Research Human Disease IINTRODUCTION Human Disease, in medicine, any harmful change that interferes with the normal appearance, structure, or function of the body or any of its parts. Since time immemorial, disease has played a role in the history of societies. It has affected-and been affected by-economic conditions, wars, and natural disasters. Indeed, the impact of disease can be far greater than better-known calamities. An epidemic of influenza that swept the globe in 1918 killed between 20 million and 40 million people. Within a few months, more than 500,000 Americans died-more than were killed during World War I (1914-1918), World War II (1939-1945), the Korean War (1950- ...
    Related: alzheimer's disease, disease research, heart disease, human disease, huntington's disease, infectious disease, liver disease
  • Protein Synthesis - 1,592 words
    Protein Synthesis The process of Protein Synthesis involves many parts of the cell. Unlike other similar productions, this process is very complex and precise and therefore must be done in proper sequence to work effectively. The slightest error during this process could cause the action to experience difficulty or even fail. For example, in the production of starch, glucose molecules are combined to be stored and eventually utilized as usable chemical energy. The cell can break down the starch with little difficulty as if each molecule was identical, even though there is a wide variety of molecules. This is a different case in Protein Synthesis. In Protein Synthesis, there are twenty differ ...
    Related: protein, protein synthesis, synthesis, genetic code, blood cells
  • Resistance To Technology - 1,060 words
    Resistance To Technology Resistance to Technology Technology. What would we do without it? Probably have a lot less fun and have a lot shorter life span. Think about it, you couldnt watch Dawsons Creek or Friends every week. That would mean that the lives of millions of teenage girls in America would cease to exist. And yet there are still some people who are afraid of new technology. Theyre afraid of a technology that could improve the lives of Americans just because they saw a couple of science fiction movies where an extremely unlikely situation occurred and all hell broke loose. When in reality precautions are made to ensure that things like that wont happen. Super-intelligent sharks won ...
    Related: resistance, technology, cell anemia, people believe, wont
  • Sail Study Help Only - 1,550 words
    (Sail) Study Help Only On the voyage of the Beagle (1831-1836) Darwin collected and described thousands of animals and plants. In South America he observed the adaptations of organisms to a variety of habitat from jungle to grassland to mountain habitats. In the temperate regions the species resembled more closely the species of the tropical regions of South America rather than the corresponding species of the temperate regions of Europe. For example, in the grasslands of Argentina there are no rabbits, however, there are rodents that resemble rabbits; these rodents are unrelated to European rabbits but are similar to other rodents in South America. Moreover, the fossils in South America are ...
    Related: sail, sickle cell, cultural icon, natural selection, gradual
  • Should We Genetically Engineer Ourselves - 706 words
    Should We Genetically Engineer Ourselves? SHOULD WE GENETICALLY ENGINEER OURSELVES? Should we use new genetic information to alter our own DNA to make ourselves more adept? Last winter, scientist made a major break through in genetic engineering. They finished a complete map of DNA of a complex organism. Although the animal that they broke down is a simple flat worm, over 40% of its DNA sequence match our own. This is an astounding leap forward for genetic engineers. Genetic engineering is the use of lasers and/or chemicals to alter the sequences of nucleotides, which are the bases of DNA. Many people throughout the world greatly oppose genetic engineering. Calling it unethical, anti-Christi ...
    Related: engineer, genetically, leap forward, genetic information, faster
  • Sickle - 2,308 words
    Sickle Cell Anemia We feel that this report looks a lot better single-spaced. A Brief History of Sickle Cell Disease Sickle Cell Disease in African Tradition Sickle cell disease has been known to the peoples of Africa for hundreds, and perhaps thousands, of years. In West Africa various ethnic groups gave the condition different names: Ga tribe: Chwechweechwe Faute tribe: Nwiiwii Ewe tribe: Nuidudui Twi tribe: Ahotutuo Sickle Cell Disease in the Western Literature Description of Sickle Cell Disease In the western literature, the first description of sickle cell disease was by a Chicago physician, James B. Herrick, who noted in 1910 that a patient of his from the West Indies had an anemia cha ...
    Related: sickle, sickle cell, linus pauling, bone marrow, component
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