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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: sex roles

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  • Aggressive Behavior - 1,312 words
    Aggressive Behavior Aggression is a behavioral characteristic that refers to forceful actions or procedures (such a deliberate attack) with intentions to dominate or master. It tends to be hostile, injurious, or destructive, and is often motivated by frustration (The Merriam-Webster Dictionary, 1995). For an individual, aggressive behavior is considered understandable and normal under appropriate circumstances, but when it is frequent, intense, lasting, and pervasive, it is more likely to be a symptom of a mental disorder. Likewise, aggression between groups, can be in the form of healthy competition, but can become harmful when unfair or unjust disadvantage or frustration is perceived, lead ...
    Related: abnormal behavior, aggressive, aggressive behavior, behavioral therapy, social norms
  • Aids Related Stigma Since The Appearance Of Aids In The Late Seventies And Early Eighties, The Disease Has Had Attached To It - 1,516 words
    ... lthough some things have changed and laws have been passed, the effects if stigma are still prevalent. Many people still express feelings of fear and hostility towards PLWAs (OHare, et al., 1996). Most of the negative attitudes felt and expressed are irrational but the effects can be devastating. One effect is peoples tendency to avoid all contact with PLWAs which contributes to social isolation. Also, even though legislation has been passed, discrimination still does exist. When asked about the treatment he received at Montreal General Hospital, an HIV positive patient explained that AIDS discrimination is far from being eradicated and that PLWAs are treated in a very negative fashion i ...
    Related: aids, seventies, stigma, issues surrounding, care system
  • American Women During World War Ii - 1,808 words
    ... ing the war years for many men hoped that marriage would defer conscription to the war. This alone suggests that women's roles as wives and mothers were still dominant during the war because the nation witnessed a 25 percent rise in the population aged five and under. The popularity of marriage and the traditional gender roles that marriage carried, was exploited during the war. For example, the Office of War Information, established in the summer of 1942, worked closely with the media. President Roosevelt soon denied the OWI was being used for propaganda , yet only months after the OWI was formed, wartime propaganda began to likened women's war work to domestic chores. These trends serv ...
    Related: after world, american, american politicians, american propaganda, american society, american women, black women
  • American Women During Wwii - 1,810 words
    ... during the war years for many men hoped that marriage would defer conscription to the war. This alone suggests that women's roles as wives and mothers were still dominant during the war because the nation witnessed a 25 percent rise in the population aged five and under. The popularity of marriage and the traditional gender roles that marriage carried, was exploited during the war. For example, the Office of War Information, established in the summer of 1942, worked closely with the media. President Roosevelt soon denied the OWI was being used for propaganda , yet only months after the OWI was formed, wartime propaganda began to likened women's war work to domestic chores. These trends ...
    Related: american, american history, american politicians, american propaganda, american society, american women, black women
  • Awakening Eyes - 1,771 words
    ... t Joe requires her total submission [. . .] she retains a clear perception of herself and her situation that becomes her salvation in the end" (Wall 386). Initiating the process of stepping outside of herself and assessing her situation is the impetus for Janie to finally act in ways to improve her life. Joe's restriction "short circuits Janie's attempt to claim an identity of her own, robs her of the opportunity to negotiate respect from her peers. 'So gradually, she pressed her teeth together and learned to hush,'" but not for long (Wall 386). Finally, Janie steps up and initiates a new attitude. In her first confrontation with Joe, she declares that "Ah knows uh few things, and womenf ...
    Related: awakening, final phase, self assessment, book reports, absolute
  • Better Player - 603 words
    Better Player Many different genres of music express different feelings and ideas about social behaviors. Even if the ideas are not commonly accepted, artists can use their music to express themselves. One type of popular music that does just that is rap. The beginnings of rap are believed to have stemmed from African rhythms, which were used as a form of communication by the native peoples. Rap evolved and gained in popularity in the 1960's when a few revolutionary DJ's, including Kool DJ Herc, DJ Lovebug Starski, and DJ Hollywood, began to work block parties in the Bronx. They would bring in large speakers, hook them up to a turntable and play two of the same record at the same time, repea ...
    Related: player, main theme, social values, free will, offense
  • Caryl Churchill - 933 words
    Caryl Churchill Caryl Churchill is one of England's most premier females, modern playwrights. She has strived throughout her career as theatrical personality to make the world question roles, stereotypes and issues that are dealt with everyday, such as violence and political and sexual oppression. Not only has she been a strong force on the stage, but has also had strong influences with radio and television. Overall, this woman can simply be summarized to be a fascinating personality. Especially in a time where women did not have the same rights as women nowadays, we can safely infer that her feats represent her determination as a playwright as well as an actor. Churchill was born in London ...
    Related: churchill, cross gender, sexual discrimination, racial discrimination, column
  • Domestic Violence - 1,240 words
    Domestic Violence Why ask women when they only need to be told? Why ask women when they hope to be takenfeelings, moods, and attitudes rule a woman, not facts, reason or logicThe acquisition of knowledge or responsibility does not lessen womens need for support, guidance, and control. Quite the contrary. This attitude justifies the so-called need for men to correct their wives misbehaviour. It perpetuates the idea that women must need a man who can guide, protect and provide for them. These perceptions have been notable throughout history (Re: the rule of thumb) and it has only been in the last few decades in North America where women have been more given rights and freedoms. Yet, physical a ...
    Related: domestic abuse, domestic violence, violence, justice system, toronto star
  • Eating - 1,197 words
    ... situations. They also felt insecure about their body shape and size (Bulik, Beidel, & Duchmann, 1991, p. 210~. Another study shows that depression, anxiety, and hostility all are associated with bulimic behavior (Rebert, Stanton, & Schwarz, 1991, p. 500). The young student who experiences extreme mood swings attempts to control the emotions through a destructive cycle of overeating and purging for relief and release. One study shows that students with eating disorders are likely to come from dysfunctional families but raises the question about why some people adapt to such stress in other ways and do not become overeaters or undereaters. The severity of the eating difficulty was apparent ...
    Related: eating disorder, eating disorders, sex roles, personality inventory, texas
  • Gender Roles In Society - 1,287 words
    ... y, and achievement motivaton. Lois Hoffman summarizes the research on school - age children using five hypotheses: (1) that working mothers provide different role models than nonworking mothers; (2) that employment affects the mothers emotional state; (3) that different situational demands and emotional states of the working mother affect child rearing; (4) that working mothers give less supervision than nonworking mothers; (5) that the working mothers absence leads to emotional and cognitive deprivation in the child. Self - perception and self - esteem among women who work has been a focus of research. The high rate of depression among full - time homemakers perceive themselves powerles ...
    Related: gender, gender roles, sex roles, power systems, different ways
  • Midsummer Nights Dream - 1,496 words
    Midsummer Night's Dream William Shakespeare, born in 1594, is one of the greatest writers in literature. He dies in 1616 after completing many sonnets and plays. One of which is "A Midsummer Nights Dream." They say that this play is the most purely romantic of Shakespeares comedies. The themes of the play are dreams and reality, love and magic. This extraordinary play is a play-with-in-a-play, which master writers only write successfully. Shakespeare proves here to be a master writer. Critics find it a task to explain the intricateness of the play, audiences find it very pleasing to read and watch. "A Midsummer Nights Dream" is a comedy combining elements of love, fairies, magic, and dreams. ...
    Related: dream, midsummer, midsummer night, midsummer nights dream, nights dream
  • Moral Can Be Defined Loosely As Of Good Character Values Are A Belief, Or Standard The Question At Hand Is, Has Sex Eroded Mo - 1,785 words
    Moral can be defined loosely as of good character. Values are a belief, or standard. The question at hand is, has sex eroded moral values? Sex is everywhere. It is not limited to the bedroom anymore, but to the television, movies, billboards, office buildings and the White House. The open discussion and study of sex dates back only about a century, to the work of Sigmund Freud. Freud believed that sexuality was innate, present in humans at birth. Freud lived at a time when sexuality was considered unsavory, and was avoided in all polite conversation and social interaction. His breakthrough thinking affected social practices as well as therapeutic ones. In Freud's own era, the moral fog that ...
    Related: moral education, moral issue, sigmund freud, supreme court, phenomenon
  • Prostitution: The Uncontrolalble Vise - 1,015 words
    Prostitution: The Uncontrolalble Vise There are women who search for love, and there are those that search for money. Today, the term woman simply denotes ones sex. It does not define her character, morals and values, or even her profession. However, this was not always the case. At the end of the nineteenth century and beginning of the twentieth century, during the Progressive Era, there was a drive for reform. Various social problems became targets for investigation and intervention: child labour, juvenile delinquency, corruption in city government and police departments, and prostitution. These things were newly discovered social problems; the only differences during this period were the ...
    Related: vise, social control, social problems, single women, reform
  • Psychology And Society - 1,072 words
    ... se an acceleration of coronary artery disease, peptic ulcer disease, reproductive disturbances, fetal illness and death. Tobacco and its various components have been associated with an increased risk for cancer of various body organs like cancer of the oral cavity, esophagus, lungs, kidneys, pancreas, stomach, cervix, and bladder. Another big problem with smoking is second hand smoke. Many people who have never smoked once develop cancer faster than a regular smoker. Some of the health risks in children are: increased frequency of respiratory infections, asthma, and decreases in lung function as the lungs mature. We all know there are many good reasons to stop smoking or never start. Tob ...
    Related: psychology, society today, artery disease, black market, proof
  • Sexism In The Workplace - 1,013 words
    Sexism In The Workplace Gender Roles Children learn from their parents and society the conception of feminine and masculine. Much about these conceptions is not biological at all but cultural. The way we tend to think about men and women and their gender roles in society constitute the prevailing paradigm that influences out thinking. Riane Eisler points out that the prevailing paradigm makes it difficult for us to analyze properly the roles of men and women in prehistory we have a cultural bias that we bring to the effort and that colors our decision-making processes. Sexism is the result of that bias imposed by our process of acculturation. Gender roles in Western societies have been chang ...
    Related: sexism, workplace, family life, cultural bias, narrow
  • Sexual Dysfunction In Us - 644 words
    Sexual Dysfunction In US The article being reviewed Is from the February 22, 1999 issue of U.S. News and World Report. It is titled Not tonight, dear and is written by Wray Herbert. The article is separated into three parts dealing with sex and marriage, different statistics between the races, and the treatment of sexual dysfunction. There are a number of interesting facts in the intro that should be stated before a review of the articles body commences. The author cites a recent report consisting of interviews from 3,000 adults about their sexual lives. One of the findings from the report is that at nearly any given time almost one third of American men and 4 out of 10 American qomen suffer ...
    Related: dysfunction, erectile dysfunction, sexual, sexual desire, sexual dysfunction
  • Sociology: The Family - 1,170 words
    Sociology: The Family One of the main institutions in society is found within the household and is popularly known as The Family. It is here, in the family, where the commencement of society takes place. It is amongst this unit that the origin of womens oppression began with the constant power struggle between man and woman. With the nuclear family slowly being thrown out the window and the new dual-earner family creeping in to takes its place, its no wonder that womens positions have changed radically over the past one hundred years. The key work here to this being position, because although womens position has changed, their workload has not. With this radical change many issues can be add ...
    Related: changing family, family member, modern family, nuclear family, standard of living
  • Sociology: The Family - 1,142 words
    ... the most popular types of families. Three types of dual earner family ideologies were identified by Lye. Those three are the Traditional, Modern, and Egalitarian. As the trend of double income family household increases, the breakdown of the traditional system (Lye, 1993, 157) due to women entering the paid labour force has had profound transformation with respect to family life and gender roles. The Traditional family as identified by Mintz and Mahalik is described briefly as marriage based on a form on benevolent male dominance couple with clearly specialized roles that are assigned on the basis of gender (Mintz and Mahalik, 1996, 806). To further explain this, the traditional family ...
    Related: changing family, family life, family relationship, modern family, traditional family
  • Television Influence - 1,366 words
    Television Influence Television influences behaviors, social attitudes and physical health especially in children. Children today spend more time watching television than on any other single leisure activity. In fact, studies have shown that "the average child spends more time in front of the television than in school" (Clarke and Kurte-Coastes, 1997). There are a variety of influences that children gain from watching too much television. The impact of violence on children is a major issue, as well as the impact of stereotypical views, such as sex roles. Health can also become a problem for children who spend excessive amounts of time in front of the television. There are, however, alternati ...
    Related: television, television violence, violence on television, angeles times, bottom line
  • The Accounts From Soldiers Describing Combat In General - 780 words
    The accounts from soldiers describing combat in general present an image of a hellish nightmare where all decency and humanity could be lost. For men who fought under these conditions, coming home was a very difficult transition. Above all, these men wanted to return to "normalcy", to come back to a life that they had been promised if the war was won. This would turn out to be harder to obtain then first expected, problems ranging from the availability of jobs in the work force to child raising and post-traumatic stress would make this return to "normalcy" very troublesome. This laborious task of reintegrating into American culture would eventually lead to problems in the gender relations in ...
    Related: combat, describing, african american, post traumatic, upward
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